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    Is music haram? Please provide exact references

    Is music haram? All music? Including nasheeds/naats (with or without instruments)? Please provide exact references from where in the quran or hadith it says music is haram. Thanks.

    #2
    Re: Is music haram? Please provide exact references

    Nahi provide kertay reference. Kar lo Jo karna hai.
    People are afraid of what they don't understand

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      #3
      Re: Is music haram? Please provide exact references

      candy_apple

      Taharat karo, Wudu karo, achey kaprey pahno, khushbu lagao, namaz parro, Quran parro

      Us ke baad agar music sunney ka dil karta hai ... To phir baat karley na
      The Prophet(SAW) said:
      "I am leaving you two things and you will never go astray as long as you cling to them -- they are the Book of Allah and my Sunnah." [Reported by Al- Haakim - Sahih].

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Is music haram? Please provide exact references

        This may help

        Islam Aur Moseeqi By Shaykh Mufti Muhammad Shafi (r.a)
        لا عيش إلا عيش الآخرة
        BROTHERS NOT SLAVES. Regain Respect

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Is music haram? Please provide exact references

          Allah says what means: "And of mankind is he who purchases idle talks (i.e. music, singing, etc.) to mislead (men) from the Path of Allaah without knowledge, and takes it (the Path of Allaah, the Verses of the Qur'aan) by way of mockery. For such there will be a humiliating torment (in the Hell-fire)." [Surah Luqman (Prophet Luqman) Verse 6]
          'Fall in love with your Creator, and the creation will fall in love with you'

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            #6
            Re: Is music haram? Please provide exact references

            He gives people talent and Beautiful voices And then says people who appreciate such a thing will be tormented?

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              #7
              Re: Is music haram? Please provide exact references

              Originally posted by philosophy View Post
              He gives people talent and Beautiful voices And then says people who appreciate such a thing will be tormented?
              Is there no usage other than singing 'Pyar di Ganderi' and 'Billo de Kaar'? Just thinking
              We should care for each other more than we care for ideas, or else we will end up killing each other.

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                #8
                Re: Is music haram? Please provide exact references

                Originally posted by philosophy View Post
                He gives people talent and Beautiful voices And then says people who appreciate such a thing will be tormented?
                you are allowed to kill people becuase you have the power given by ALLAH? Some one is allowed to rape becuase he has been given the power?

                Why dont these people use their beautiful voices for recitation?

                ajeeb
                لا عيش إلا عيش الآخرة
                BROTHERS NOT SLAVES. Regain Respect

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Is music haram? Please provide exact references

                  vo gaane/na't vaGhaira jin meN 7 sur lagaaye jaate hoN with or without music [both string N non-string instruments] is Haraam...

                  ...isii liye Qur'aan kii tilaavat meN 7 sur nahiiN lagaaye jaate.

                  got it?
                  Life is NOT measured by the number of breaths we take but the moments that take our breath away!!!
                  16 breaths a minute, 23040 a day...NO one knows which one will be their LAST!

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                    #10
                    Re: Is music haram? Please provide exact references

                    cheezen halaal haraam nahin hotin un ka istemal saheeh aur ghalat hota hai jis ki bunyaad par aik hi cheez ka saheeh istemaal drust aur ghalat istemaal naadrust yani ghalat. agar ham is baat ko samajh len ge to molavyun ki banayee hui mangharat baatun par behs karne se bach jaayen ge.
                    kisi bhi cheez ka saheeh istemaal yeh hai keh us ko istemaal main la kar insaniyat aur khud ko faaida pohnchaayen. isi tarah kisi bhi cheez ka ghalat istemaal yeh hai keh aap insaniyat aur khud apne aap ko nuqsaan ponchaayen.

                    English Translation of The Quran : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive

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                      #11
                      Re: Is music haram? Please provide exact references

                      What is the interpretation of "Idle Talk"?

                      My interpretation is that it means one should not gossip and it has nothing to do with music. So music is not haram.

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                        #12
                        Re: Is music haram? Please provide exact references

                        Originally posted by khubsoorat View Post
                        Allah says what means: "And of mankind is he who purchases idle talks (i.e. music, singing, etc.) to mislead (men) from the Path of Allaah without knowledge, and takes it (the Path of Allaah, the Verses of the Qur'aan) by way of mockery. For such there will be a humiliating torment (in the Hell-fire)." [Surah Luqman (Prophet Luqman) Verse 6]
                        Please do not get misguided by translation of Quran done by people like Mohsin Ali adding their own beliefs as part of Quran in translation (as Mohsin Ali did in above translation).

                        Music is allowed in Islam just like any good, pleasurable, or enjoyable things Allah has created and allowed his creation to enjoy. There is no place in Quran where poetry or Music is made haram ... and that is obvious too, as to make Music, poetry or similar gifts of Allah, haram would have been illogical ... and Allah do not command anything illogical ... rather all commands of Allah has 'hikmat'.

                        Quran itself had element of poetry and hearing the recitation of Quran is Music to the ears of most Believers. Music and poetry is neither ‘idol talk nor waste of time’. Only those who have no heart or mind to love the gifts of Allah (like Shaitan) do not like Music and Poetry.

                        As for above translation by Mohsin Ali, it is a translation full of putting own thoughts or beliefs and intermingling that with the words of Allah … and such people (like Mohsin Ali) who change the meaning of Quran by adding their own words to misguide people (even though their own misguiding words are in brackets) for Money (Petro-dollar), for their own desires, to promote their beliefs, or their whim ... would surely burn in hell … and same goes for those who take translators (like Mohsin Ali) misguiding words as words of Allah.

                        Proper translation of above ayah (31:6) is:

                        Sahih International
                        And of the people is he who buys the amusement of speech to mislead [others] from the way of Allah without knowledge and who takes it in ridicule. Those will have a humiliating punishment.

                        Pickthall
                        And of mankind is he who payeth for mere pastime of discourse, that he may mislead from Allah's way without knowledge, and maketh it the butt of mockery. For such there is a shameful doom.

                        Yusuf Ali
                        But there are, among men, those who purchase idle tales, without knowledge (or meaning), to mislead (men) from the Path of Allah and throw ridicule (on the Path): for such there will be a Humiliating Penalty.

                        Shakir
                        And of men is he who takes instead frivolous discourse to lead astray from Allah's path without knowledge, and to take it for a mockery; these shall have an abasing chastisement.

                        Dr. Ghali
                        And of mankind are (they) who trade diverting discourse to lead into error away from the way of Allah without knowledge, and to take it to themselves in mockery; those will have a degrading torment.

                        In Quran the word used for tales or discourse is 'Hadith' ... and hadith do not mean music or poetry ... but it means 'saying' ... and from above verse it is clear that here Allah tells people that do not buy (accept) those stories or tales (or sayings) that makes you astray and take you away from truth ... that people concerned buy (accept) without understanding or knowing ... and then use what they accept to mislead innocent people from path of Allah or to ridicule them:

                        And we see that happening 'now a day' a lot when we see people like Kharjees misguiding people and making fun of other Muslims (ridiculing them) due to their deviant and misguided untrue beliefs they buy from their so-called scholars (translation of Mohsin Ali is just one example) ... and so on.
                        Last edited by Sa1eem; Sep 17, 2013, 04:18 PM.

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                          #13
                          Re: Is music haram? Please provide exact references

                          There are things people may agree or disagree about Poetry and Music … or whatever some Muslims misunderstood saying of Prophet (SAW) … here is history of poetry and Music in Islam … most astounding is what Imam Ghazali wrote about Music.

                          One thing Muslims should remember that it is great sin to make something haram what Allah has not made halal (as by doing this, many would go to hell). Islamic principle regarding haram and halal is that, what Allah has made Haram Allah has clearly mentioned in Quran and if there is something not mentioned in Quran as Haram than it is generally considered as Halal (same goes with music and poetry).

                          Here is an article on Music … and regardless of the content that one may or may not agree, what is mentioned is considered as historical facts … shows that various types of Music were part of Islam since the time of Prophet (SAW) and at no stage Music was considered Haram by Muslim masses at large (and remembering the hadith that Muslim masses would never agree to something that is wrong in Islam … means that since Muslim masses always considered poetry and Music acceptable, they could not be Haram … and all those who preached against it were in minority and thus deviant in this regard).

                          Is Music Permissible? The Quran Online

                          Is Music Permissible?
                          The question whether music is permissible at all began to be debated in the first century of Islam and the debate has continued to the present day. This debate has filled thousands of pages. Early religious authorities had opposed music due to the role it had played in society. This ‘new music’ was related more and more with a life of pleasure and a taste of luxury. It procured connotations of flightiness and sensual indulgence, reinforced by the participation of women in music-making and by the dancing (often considered obscene) and the drinking of intoxicating beverages that were associated with it. Even the two sacred cities of Makkah and Madinah were not invulnerable from these temptations, and indeed they quickly became authentic centers of entertainment. Islamic music is divided into six periods. During the first period of Islam, and particularly during the reigns of the last two Khulafa-e-Rashideen (the rightly guided Caliphs), Hadrat Uthman(RA) and Hadrat Imam Ali(RA), Madinah became the center of intense musical activity. Despite frequent campaigns against music by the religious authorities, professional musicians were welcomed in the houses of the rich and noble, and encouraged by lavish rewards. These musicians were mainly freed slaves of Persian origin, such as Tuwais (d. 92 AH/710 AD) and Khathir (d 64 AH/683 AD), who is said to have taught Arabic music to Nasheet, the Persian slave who became a famous musician. Among the female musicians of Arab origin ‘Azza al-Mayla (d. 86 AH/705 AD) occupies the first place. Her house was a real cultural salon, visited by the literary and musical elite. Some of the rhythmical modes began to crystallize during this period; its most characteristic type of song is called the al-ghina’ al-mutqan. (REF. The Dimension of Sound by A. Shiloah in The World of Islam, Ed. Bernard Lewis, Thames and Hudson Ltd, London, pp. 161-180, 1976)

                          Under the Umayyads the center of musical interest moved to the new capital, Damascus. Some of the caliphs (Khulafa) had a real passion for music; consequently musical activity increased, musicians multiplied and their social status rose. With the Abbasid dynasty the capital shifted to Baghdad. Here, during the next two centuries, Islamic music attained its highest point. This was its golden age. Musicians continued to enjoy favor at the caliphs’ court and to play an important part in the country’s cultural life. Society was eager for knowledge of all kinds. The study of music was now obligatory for every educated man, part of the encyclopedic learning he was expected to acquire, and in the intellectual flowering, which reached a climax in the IV/10th century music played a role. At the same time, the musician was expected to be widely cultured. Music itself became highly sophisticated and began to be the subject of learned controversies between thinkers with different artistic conceptions. The melodic and rhythmic modes were definitively codified. Theories were evolved, practice described. Instruments themselves were perfected and standards of performance rose even higher. Among the great musicians were Ibn Misjah (d.169 AH/ 785 AD), Ibn Muhriz (d, 97 AH/ 715 AD), Ibn Surayj (13-108 AH/634-726AD), al-Gharid (d. 106 AH/724 AD), Siyyat (d. 169 AH/785 AD), Zalzaal (d. 175 AH/791 AD), Mukhariq (d. 229 AH/845 AD), ‘Alluya and ‘Amr ibn Baanaa (d 278 AH/891 AD). Distinguished female singers were Basbas, ‘Ubayda, Shariyya, Dananir and Mahbuba. In Muslim Spain music continued to play a prominent part in spite of the worsening political situation.

                          The greatest of Arabic theorists, al-Farabi (d. 339 AH/ 950 AD), wrote in his Kitab al-Musiqi al-Kabir: ‘Theory did not appear until practice had already achieved its highest development.’ This was certainly the case by his own time.

                          There was no clear line of separation between sacred and secular music, and sacred music itself has throughout its long history oscillated between art and folk music. According to some of the traditions, Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) approved the folk music and not the art music. Consequently art music was completely banished.

                          The Qur’an is the only text that proclaims absolute Divine Laws, “Shari’ah”. What is haram is clearly haram and what is halal is clearly halal. On the theological level, the authorities to which the two sides appeal are the Qur’an, the Hadith, the writings of religious leaders, the opinions of mystics and legal precedents. The Qur’an provides no specific verdict one way or the other, so it was the hadith which was the main source of ammunition. Literal interpretation of texts was reinforced by reasoning by analogy.

                          Imam Al-Ghazali (d.505 AH/1111 AD) makes brilliant use of this method and the chapter devoted to music in his Ihya Ulum al-Deen (Vivification of the Religious Sciences) is a masterpiece. In it he says that there is something wrong with the man or woman who does not like music. He declared ”One who is not moved by music is unsound of mind and intemperate; is far from spirituality and is denser than birds and beasts: because everyone is affected by melodious sounds.” (ASK Joommal, Al-Balaagh, Supplement to August/September, 1985)

                          An African Muslim named Sa’id, who traveled widely, translated the songs of other countries into Arabic, and first worked out the system which became classic for Arabic music.

                          Singing has always been the most common and most loved form of music, partly no doubt because of the Arabs’ fondness for poetry. Good songs and poetry have been in Islamic culture since the time of the Prophet (pbuh), and who himself listened to good poetry and encouraged Hassan bin Thabit (known as the Poet of the Prophet) to say the poetry in the praise of Allah and in the honor of His Religion and His messenger. Most often simple instruments accompany it. Early Muslims studied theories of sound and music, and the rhythmic measuring of music was practiced among the Arabs long before it was known in Europe and the use of the baton goes back to the eighth century, so the modern Drum Major is all unconsciously in their debt. They knew nothing of harmony and made little use of accent, but they adorned the melody by a comparison note now and again, which perhaps prepared the way for harmony, later developed in the West.

                          Since instrumental music was a part of pagan ways of worship, Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) forbade it to his followers, saying it was “the devil’s muezzin, calling men to worship him.”

                          His objections were soon ignored. Military bands accompanied armies and shared in the celebration of victories. They had drums, kettle-drums, pipes of many sorts, cymbals, and tambourines. Making musical instruments became a fine art.

                          The lute was the earliest stringed instrument; it was of many shapes and sizes. Then came the guitar-qitara, the harp, and the rabab, an instrument played with a bow. Skilled players could drive away fears and depression, as the young shepherd Prophet David (Dawood-peace be upon him) for King Saul. More modest fiddlers played at weddings, raveling from village, to village, as they do today using the same instruments.

                          Makkah and Madinah became centers of music. Musicians in gala attire accompanied the pilgrimage processions to Makkah, rivaling in interest even the festivities of the Hajj itself, for the people believed that rejoicing with music and companionship was preparation for he ecstasy of the sacred celebration.
                          (REF: Allah-the God of Islam, Muslim Life and Worship by Florence Mary Fitch, published by Lothrop, Lee and Shepard Co., Inc. New York, 1950 p.90)
                          Last edited by Sa1eem; Sep 17, 2013, 04:23 PM.

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                            #14
                            Re: Is music haram? Please provide exact references

                            Music during earlier periods of Islam [Prophet (SAW) and Khulfa-e-Rashadeen]

                            Even though Music and poetry developed a lot in Muslim Kingdoms of Ummayads, Abbasis, Ottoman, Mughals, Safavids, etc … let see the situation during the time of Prophet (SAW) and Khulfa-e-Rashadeens.

                            During the time of Prophet (SAW) there is clear evident that Prophet (SAW) tolerated and occasionally encouraged music. For instance, pilgrimage chanting (changing during Haj), festival and celebration songs, war song, etc. We know how he approved song with music Muhajirs and Ansars did in celebration of Prophet (SAW) entering Madina … and tribal dance with songs and Music he let Aisha (RA) watch.

                            Further, Prophet (SAW) instituted Adhan in the form of Music chanting by Muezzin [Bilal (RA) who had great voice and was considered acclaimed Singer].

                            Later we hear that after Prophet (SAW), during Khulfa-e-Rashadeen rule, when Islam got in contact with outside world and many Musical instruments came … a lot of improvement was made in Musical instruments and many refined Musicians developed. Development and tuning of lute (instrument coming to Arabs from contact with Persians) was done by Muslim Arabs and later lute became widely used instrument of Arabs.

                            It is during the time of Khulfa-e-Rashadeen we hear of famous Arab female Musician-Singer Azza Al-Mayla (died 86H) and male musician-poet-singer ‘Tuways’ (632 H – 710 H).

                            All shows that there is nothing wrong with poetry, Music or Musical instruments. All wrong is how one uses these gifts from Allah.

                            It is same way that there is nothing wrong with books, movies, chatting with each other, or parties (gatherings) … but if they are used for sinful pleasures or pornography then books, movies, even talking to each other, or gatherings (parties) could become source of evil and sin.

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