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    Ever wondered ...?

    Ah salammu alaiqum, I'm sure a great number of Muslims have seen/received/read the following article, but here's it for others...

    Ever wondred...
    • Why a nun can be covered from head to toe and she's respected for devoting herself to God, but when a Muslim women does that, she's "oppressed"?
    • Why a Jew can grow a beard and he's just practicing his faith, and when a Muslim does that, he's an extremist?
    • When a western woman stays at home to look after the house and kids she's sacrificing herself and doing good for the household, but when a Muslim woman does so, she "needs to be liberated"?
    • Why is it that when a child dedicates himself to a subject, he has potential, and when a child dedicates himself to Islam, he is hopeless?
    • When a Christian kills someone, religion is not mentioned, (i.e., Ireland and the IRA) but when a Muslim is charged with a crime, it's Islam that goes to trial?
    • But then again, why is it after all that, Islam is still the fastest growing religion in the world ?




    [This message has been edited by Paxtani Mentality (edited August 10, 2002).]

    #2
    here's something else...

    FUNNY, ISN'T IT?

    Funny how a $20 bill looks so big when you take it to Mosque,
    but so small when you take it to the market.

    Funny how long it takes to do Zikr for an hour,
    but how quickly a team plays 60 minutes of basketball.

    Funny how long a couple of hours spent at Mosque are,
    but how short they are when watching a movie.

    Funny how we can't think of anything to say when we pray,
    but don't have difficulty thinking of things to talk about to a friend.

    Funny how we get thrilled when a baseball game goes into extra innings,
    but we complain when "Tarawih" during Ramadhan is longer than the regular time.

    Funny how hard it is to read a Paragraph in the Quran,
    but how easy it is to read 100 pages of a best selling novel.

    Funny how people want to get a front seat at any game or concert,
    but scramble to get a back row at mosque so that scramble out.

    Funny how we need 2 or 3 weeks advance notice to fit a Mosque event into our schedule,
    but can adjust our schedule for other events at the last moment.

    Funny how hard it is for people learn a simple Preaching well enough to tell others,
    but how simple it is for the same people to understand and repeat gossip.

    Funny how we believe what the newspaper says,
    but question what the Quran says.

    Funny how everyone wants to go to heaven provided they do not have to believe,
    or to think, or to say, or do anything.

    Funny how you can send a thousand 'jokes' through e-mail and they spread like wildfire, but when you start sending messages regarding the Lord,
    people think twice about sharing.

    FUNNY, ISN'T IT?
    Are you laughing?
    Are you thinking?
    Spread the Word and give thanks to Allah for He is good & Mercifull!

    -Anonymous

    Comment


      #3
      Muslim women are seen to be in need of liberation from oppression not due to their attire, but by the denigration that is freely admitted to be the case by Muslims themselves. There is criticism which is warranted and there is criticism which is meant to do harm.

      The Taliban made a big deal out of men's beards and became seen in Western eyes as a sign of extremism from that source. Anything the Taliban were for became wrong to westerners, whether Islamically correct or not.

      The problem of madrassas teaching only a curiculum of narrow substance and not a full palete of acceptable learning is problematic. Especially in light of the schools in the past that had no concurrent equal.

      Religion is a part of Northern Irish strife and is mentioned. The PLO is a sectarian organization, but is often mentioned in the same breath as Hamas or Hizbullah.

      The central point I am trying to make is that there needs to be a much better dialogue between Muslims and the West.

      Both Al-Queda and the Zionists have put serious obstacles in the way of this.

      Salaam!

      Comment


        #4
        Dear Tomasso,

        Originally posted by Tomasso:

        Muslim women are seen to be in need of liberation from oppression not due to their attire, but by the denigration that is freely admitted to be the case by Muslims themselves. There is criticism which is warranted and there is criticism which is meant to do harm.
        I see no balance in this criticism that you speak of. You seem to be suggesting that Muslims should come to a compromise in their religion simply because aspects of Islaam are not acceptable in the West. Who judges what is 'warranted' and what is 'harmful'? The West!?

        Orogonally posted by Tomasso:

        The Taliban made a big deal out of men's beards and became seen in Western eyes as a sign of extremism from that source. Anything the Taliban were for became wrong to westerners, whether Islamically correct or not.
        The problem with the so called 'civilised' west is that they try and dictate the world through their propoganda of an ideal society. What may seem like a utopia to one, does not necessary apply to the other. If the Taliban impose laws on men to grow beards, it becomes oppressive and intolerable. How do you think the Taliban feel when the west promotes the homosexual culture, which is clearly inhumane and an act against nature? Is this not exteremism? Do they start criticising every western policy and sizing up for an assault against the US?

        Originally posted by Tomasso:

        The problem of madrassas teaching only a curiculum of narrow substance and not a full palete of acceptable learning is problematic. Especially in light of the schools in the past that had no concurrent equal.
        And maybe the schools of the west need to move away from their ignorance toward Islaam and start teaching the religion as part of the curriculum.

        Originally posted by Tomasso:

        The central point I am trying to make is that there needs to be a much better dialogue between Muslims and the West.
        I'm afraid i disagree ... it's not about dialogue. The west is never interested in dialogue. Look at the US and its invasions and wars into Panama, Nicaragua, Vietnam, Laos, Korea, Iraq, Afghanistan etc.

        In fact, it's about justice. Generally speaking, western foreign policy is the most unjust and has been throughout history: it's about oppresion, power and domination. And it recognises the number one threat and enemy as Islaam - the fastest growing Religion in the world. This, my friend, is the reality.

        &peace

        -------------------
        "No leaf falls except that He knows of it, and no rain drop forms except that He has willed it."

        Comment


          #5
          When Muslims agree with aspects of western criticism, it would seem to be warranted. I do not suggest you remake Islam in the Image of the West. This is explicitly pointed out as a no-no by your religion. There are plenty of Muslims who are aware the extent to which their societies need Islamic reform. The Muslims are welcome to rail against that which they disagree with, just as US based religions raise a voice. There is religious education in America, but in public schools the moral high ground is subservient to the bad influences of the free society. The media etc. of years past used to attempt to correct the bad aspects of the culture, now they tear it down. I would not agree that all intervention in the places you list were done for reasons of domination, oppression or power. The Communists violated borders of countries in Korea, Viet Nam, Laos and Afganistan. Saddam violated Kuwait's border, with a possible nod and a wink by the US. Panama and Nicaragua had issues with narcotics and instability. I recognize Bin Laden's main gripes as legitimate, but his methods are the problem. The US tilt towards Israel, the presence of US troops in Arabia(now being drawn down) and to some extent the plight of ordinary Iraqis seems to be in need of redress.

          [This message has been edited by TOMASSO (edited August 12, 2002).]

          Comment


            #6
            The issue is quite clear really. To get along with others one has to compromise some of the time. The issue is that if one comprises on Islam, then it is not clear that what results is Islam at all. That is what I hear the religious conservative saying on this site and other sites that I have visited. I do not disagree with them and I sense their conviction. The problem is that what is Islam is starting to be defined by who can shout a propoganda the loudest.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Tomasso:

              There are plenty of Muslims who are aware the extent to which their societies need Islamic reform. The Muslims are welcome to rail against that which they disagree with, just as US based religions raise a voice.
              Might i ask, who exactly are these Musims and which reforms do they speak of? Also, who is welcoming Muslims to "rail against that which they disagree with"?

              ------------------
              "No leaf falls except that He knows of it, and no rain drop forms except that He has willed it."

              Comment


                #8
                A quick response that should encapsulate what I mean is that by reading this forum, it becomes clear that the nations associated with Islam do not come close to the "classic" Islamic ideal of governence. Persecutions, manipulations, lack of respect, lack of social justice and the list goes on. These Muslims seem informed, sincere and concerned about their societies in the context of Islmas's ability to rebound after calamity to refine itself. The outrage felt by Muslims is also felt by other faiths. The welcome is extended to those who live in the West to protest politically. The Khalifa would be difficult to implement in the West, but Muslim influence would be possible. Unfortunately, recent events have imperiled this. Your fundos would have been more sucessful waging a "war" of debate. This has been done in Britain where there is governmental recognition and representation. Britain had once not treated the Muslim world with enough respect, but has come a long way from those days.

                Comment

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