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    Poetry and fine speech

    Fwd'ing

    Adil Salahi, Saudi Arabia.

    It is often said that Islam does not encourage poetry. But such a
    general statement is far from accurate. A medium length Surah in the
    Qur’an is given the title, Al-Shu’ara’, or The Poets. It concludes with
    a few verses condemning exaggerations that poets often resort to. It
    also criticizes them for the wide gap between what they say and what
    they do. These concluding verses run as follows: "As for the poets, only
    those who are lost in grievous error would follow them. Are you not
    aware that they roam confusedly through all valleys, and that they often
    say what they do not do? Excepted are those of them who believe and do
    righteous deeds, remember God often and defend themselves after having
    been wronged. Indeed the wrongdoers will in time come to know how evil a
    turn their destinies are bound to take." (26: 224-227)

    This is not a condemnation of all poetry or all poets. It distinguishes
    between exaggerated statements often used by poets and poetry that
    observes the moral values stressed by Islam, particularly commitment to
    truth and resisting oppression. When poets indulge in unrestrained
    exaggeration of feelings, emotions or actions, or extol their own
    virtues in an exercise of great self-admiration, or assure their
    audience of great things which they know to be unreal, then Islam
    strongly censures them.

    But poets who use their talent to serve the cause of the truth,
    stressing good moral values, propagating true principles, and advocating
    Islam will have a double reward. They will achieve a good standing among
    people in their own generation and in later generations.

    This is a valuable reward in this life, and they stand to earn reward
    from God on the Day of Judgment.

    It is to the first type of poetry that the Prophet refers when he says:
    "It is more preferable for any one of you that his inside is full of
    puss eating into his body than its being full of poetry." (Related in
    all six main collections of Hadith). The Hadith gives a horrid picture
    of the type of person who allows such pursuits to pervade his poetry,
    throwing to the wall all moral values that restrain people’s speech and
    encourage them to say only what is right and proper.

    By contrast, the Prophet praises poets who use their talent to emphasize
    virtues and advocate proper values. He is quoted to have said: "Some
    poetry is pure wisdom." (Related by Al-Bukhari, Abu Dawood and Ibn
    Majah) The same wording is used in another Hadith which mentions that a
    Bedouin came to the Prophet and spoke most eloquently. The Prophet
    commented: "Some fine speech is pure magic and some poetry is pure
    wisdom." (Related by Al-Bukhari in Al-Adab Al-Mufrad, Abu Dawood,
    Al-Tirmithi, Ibn Majah and others).

    Here the Prophet compares the effect of fine speech to magic in the
    sense that both may captivate an audience. That speech may be
    captivating is a well-known experience. The speaker may be an orator, or
    someone speaking at leisure when a group of people are listening, and he
    or she provides some highly interesting talk. His listeners may be all
    attentive as he expounds his ideas to them. Similarly, poets can use
    their talent and their understanding of human nature and their life
    experience to highlight some very useful meaning. This is noted most
    particularly in the poetry of Al-Mutanabbi, a famous Arab poet who lived
    around 800 years ago. Some of his wise sayings are still treated as very
    relevant to human society today.

    In Islam, poets can have a very prominent role. We know about Hassan ibn
    Thabit, who is often described as the Prophet’s own poet. Hassan was a
    fine poet who belonged to the Ansar, the Prophet’s companions from
    Madinah. As Islam was fighting the onslaught of the unbelievers who
    tried hard to suppress its message, the information battle was no less
    important than the military fight. Unbelieving poets were engaged in a
    determined attack on the Prophet and his companions. Poetry traveled
    easily in Arabia and was appreciated by all Arabs.

    Hence, it was necessary for Muslim poets to rise to the occasion and
    defend Islam in poetry to reply to the abuse of pagan poets. Hassan went
    to the Prophet, seeking permission to use his poetic talent against the
    unbelievers in Makkah, who were leading the fight against Islam. It is
    universally known that the Prophet himself belonged to Quraysh, the main
    Arab tribe in Makkah. If Hassan were to attack this tribe, he would
    implicitly attack the Prophet as he belonged to them. Hence, the Prophet
    asked him: "How about my relation to them?" Hassan said: "I will
    extricate you like a hair is pulled out of dough."

    This promise Hassan honored with great dexterity. He was able to write
    poetry of the highest quality in praise of the Prophet, defense of Islam
    and criticism of Quraysh and its attitude to both the Prophet and God’s
    message. Thus, he attained high distinction as the main media fighter
    for the cause of Islam during the lifetime of the Prophet and for many
    years to come after the Prophet had passed away.

    His position was acknowledged by Aishah, the Prophet’s wife. It so
    happened that, on a certain occasion, Hassan took a wrong attitude in a
    question involving Aishah. She was innocent and free of blame in that
    question, and this fact is expressly stated in the Qur’an. But prior to
    that, Hassan said the wrong words against her. He came to regret that
    and the matter was thus settled.

    Aishah no longer thought of the matter and she appreciated Hassan’s role
    in the advocacy of Islam. A report by a relative of Aishah who belonged
    to the generation of successors to the Prophet’s companions goes as
    follows: "I severely criticized Hassan in Aishah’s presence, but she
    said to me, ‘Do not condemn him, for he used to defend God’s messenger,
    (peace be upon him)’." (Related by Al-Bukhari in Al-Adab Al-Mufrad.)

    Her magnanimous attitude speaks volumes for her integrity and commitment
    to the cause of Islam. She forgot her personal grievance against the man
    and remembered only his virtue in defending Islam and the Prophet. Her
    attitude provides an example that should be followed by Muslims in later
    generations. It is an attitude that puts the cause of the Muslim
    community above the personal interests or grievances of individuals,
    regardless of their position in society.
    http://www.arabnews.com/

    ------------------
    "I put my trust in Allah, my Lord and your Lord! There is not a moving creature, but He has a grasp of its forelock. Verily, my Lord is on the straight path. (The truth)"
    (11:55-56)

    "...Indeed my prayer, my sacrifice, my living and my dying are for Allaah, the Lord of the worlds" (6:162)

    #2
    Jazak'Allahu Khai'run sister

    Comment


      #3
      shukar hai meri laaj reh gayee....
      werna poetry ki wajah se hee badnaam ho jaata....



      ------------------
      "Our Lord! forgive us our sins and anything we may have done that transgressed our duty; establish our feet firmly and help us against those that resist faith." Quran(3:147)
      Both Halal & Haram r evident but between them r doubtful things, most ppl have no knowledge about them. So whoever saves himself from suspicious things saves his religion & honor, & whoever indulges in suspicious things indulges in Haram.

      Comment


        #4
        Well, what about fictional books?

        For example, Tolkien invented the whole Lord of the Rings world...all fantasy...even the creatures dont really exist...but the message he's trying to give is all in accordance with good principles...

        so is it okay to use fantasy as a tool to promote good values...when it is understood by the readers that they are entering a fictional world and that the message is more important than the fiction and the fantastical world doesn't exist...and that the fiction serves as a tool rather than the heart of the literature?
        I believe in dragons, good men, and other fantasy creatures.

        Comment


          #5
          It is okay.

          Comment


            #6
            PCG: I've been reading your posts and I've noticed that you do have a lot of questions (which is good) that you want to be answered. You usually tend to disagree with the fatawa and instead come up with your own solutions. So do you really want someone to look up a fatwa on it (fictional books/movies)?

            Originally posted by google:
            It is okay.
            How do you know it is okay? You a scholar or a mufti? Or maybe you've looked up some fatwa on it. Mind sharing it with the rest of us please?

            ------------------
            "I put my trust in Allah, my Lord and your Lord! There is not a moving creature, but He has a grasp of its forelock. Verily, my Lord is on the straight path. (The truth)"
            (11:55-56)

            "...Indeed my prayer, my sacrifice, my living and my dying are for Allaah, the Lord of the worlds" (6:162)

            [This message has been edited by Sadiaa (edited June 21, 2002).]

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Sadiaa:
              PCG: I've been reading your posts and I've noticed that you do have a lot of questions (which is good) that you want to be answered. You usually tend to disagree with the fatawa and instead come up with your own solutions. So do you really want someone to look up a fatwa on it (fictional books/movies)? How do you know it is okay? You a scholar or a mufti? Or maybe you've looked up some fatwa on it. Mind sharing it with the rest of us please?
              Saadia
              Don't you think Al-Quran has enough of imaginative stuff?

              Comment


                #8
                And no, I am not a scholar. Neither does your copy and paste makes you one.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I certainly dont come up with my own solutions on things. I state facts, and I use reasoning to come up with my ideas. If you have a problem with something I've said, you're welcome to drop me a PM on it.

                  I've asked a straightforward question , it would be nice to recieve a straightforward answer.
                  I believe in dragons, good men, and other fantasy creatures.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Google: I never claimed to be one... that is why I post fatawa by scholars and not make up my own.

                    PCG: I'm sure someone will inshAllah provide you with the answer.

                    ------------------
                    "I put my trust in Allah, my Lord and your Lord! There is not a moving creature, but He has a grasp of its forelock. Verily, my Lord is on the straight path. (The truth)"
                    (11:55-56)

                    "...Indeed my prayer, my sacrifice, my living and my dying are for Allaah, the Lord of the worlds" (6:162)

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by PyariCgudia:
                      Well, what about fictional books?

                      For example, Tolkien invented the whole Lord of the Rings world...all fantasy...even the creatures dont really exist...but the message he's trying to give is all in accordance with good principles...

                      so is it okay to use fantasy as a tool to promote good values...when it is understood by the readers that they are entering a fictional world and that the message is more important than the fiction and the fantastical world doesn't exist...and that the fiction serves as a tool rather than the heart of the literature?
                      if it gives a good message, its worth reading....
                      even if it was not fictional characters but real characters with a false story....

                      lets base it on the hadith which says all actions r valued on the intentions....


                      Quran itself gives many real stories meant for giving a lesson to people....



                      ------------------
                      "Our Lord! forgive us our sins and anything we may have done that transgressed our duty; establish our feet firmly and help us against those that resist faith." Quran(3:147)
                      Both Halal & Haram r evident but between them r doubtful things, most ppl have no knowledge about them. So whoever saves himself from suspicious things saves his religion & honor, & whoever indulges in suspicious things indulges in Haram.

                      Comment

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