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    jewish history

    Allah says in quran about jews
    "And (remember)when your Lord declared that He would certainly keep on sending against them(jews),till the day of resurrection,those who would afflict them with a humiliating torment"(surah AlAaraf,167)
    in another verse Allah says"Indignity is put over them wherever they may be,except when under a covenant(of protection)from Allah,and from men, they have drawn on themselves the wrath of Allah and destruction is put over them"(al Imran,112)
    Infact the jews are the"maghdubi 'alaihim'"(those who earned Allahs anger),we recite in surah fatihah.
    Narrated by Ibn umer:Zaid bin Amr bin Nufail(he was a person in makkah,on the religion of Ibrahim,before the prophethood of our prophet .He did not live long to see his prophethood)went to Sham enquiring about a true religion to follow.He met a jewish scholar and asked him about their religion .The jew said "You will not embrace our religion unless you recieve your share of Allahs anger"
    following is a brief history of jews to show how much they had to suufer due to their sins and killing of prophets,and how true is the above Quranic verse about them.
    Prophet Ibrahim migrated fro Iraq to Palestine,he setteled his son Ismaeel in Makkah and himself setteled in palestine.Allah blessed him with Ishaq and Yaqoob.Israel was the other name of prophet Yaqoob.Prophet Yaqoob had 11 OR 12 sons including Yousof.The story of prophet Yousof is given in Quraan.He invited his family to egypt and Bani Israel lived there for many centuries.Over the years the coptics of Egypt made them their slaves.Then the Pharoah inflicted them with severe torment.He killed their sons and spared their daughters.Allah saved them and drowned the pharoah in the sea.
    When Prophet Musa was taking them to palestine He said to them"O,my people !enter the holy land(palestine)which Allah has assigghned to you and turn not back(in flight);for then you will be returned as losers"(surah maida,21)
    At that time palestine was ruled by 'amaliqa' who were strong.Allah required of them to make jihad against them but they refused ,so ALLAH made the holy land forbidden for them for 40 years(we muslims had also been prevented from the holy land,may be because of giving up jihad and our disobeying Allah,Allah knows best).So, they were left to wander in the sinae desert for 40 years during which time prophet Musa, haroon died(infact prophet Musa longed for the holy land and prayed to ALLAH to bring him near the holy land at a stones throw distance)Another prophet Joshua bin noon was sent to Bani israel,he made jihad along with and conquered palestine.
    They lived in palestine for along time during which Prophet Daud, sulaiman were sent to them.But after Sulaiman differences started to arise between them and they started to fight each other.As aresult palestine was diveded into two states ,Israel with samaria as capital in the north and Judea in the south.taking advantage of this Assyrian army under Tiglath-pileserIII invaded and conquered israel ,only fortress of samaria was held out until 721B.C when assyrians successfully assaulted and took the city.many jews were killed
    NebuchadnezzarII(bakht nasr in urdu,rular of iraq at that time)attacked Judea 598B.C.,occupied it and demolished the solomon temple.and took one million jews as slaves,taking them to babylon
    in 539B.C. KING OF pERSIA cyrus attacked babylon and liberated the jews who went back to palestine and rebuilded the temple
    in 331B.C,Alexander the great,occupied palestine
    in 63B.C. romans who were pagans captured it.during this period prophet Isa(jesus)was sent to bani israel who became his enemy.
    In 70A.D.the jews revolted against the romans .the revolt was crushed and temple again demolished
    There was another revolt in 135A.D.after which the roman king exiled them out of palestine
    A Roman king Constatine accepted christianity in 313A.D. and christianity spread thruout the roman empire.Jews ware living in exile.Some came to live in MADINAH
    Islam appeared in 6 th 7th century,PROPHET MUHAMMAD migrated to madinah,Jews were punished by Him due to their conspiracies against islam.Some of their tribes were exiled from madinah ,banu quraizah were killed(about 700 of their men)as a punishment.Prophet fought battle of khaibar and defeated them.
    In 632 A.D CALIPH OMAR conquered palestine from romans`
    Islamic Tolerance
    The rise of Islam created no great disturbance in the Jewish communities of
    Babylonia. Muslim armies conquered Mesopotamia in 637, and the religion of
    Islam became the state religion. A series of nominal restrictions against
    Jews was decreed by the Code of Omar, promulgated by Caliph Omar I. Jews were
    permitted to hold no political office and could have no Muslim servants.
    They could not bear arms, build or repair synagogues, or worship in loud
    voices. Moreover, they were required to wear yellow patches on their sleeves
    as a distinguishing mark. The caliphs of Baghdad did not consider themselves
    bound by the code and permitted the Jews to retain virtual autonomy.
    The period of Islamic tolerance was marked by cooperation between Muslims and
    Jews that resulted in a development of culture based on a combination of
    Greek, Muslim, and Jewish learning at a time when Europe was still in the
    so-called Dark Ages.
    Jews in Medieval Europe
    In the middle of the 10th century the center of learning, both secular and
    religious, shifted from Mesopotamia to Spain, then a Muslim country.
    Colonies of Jews had existed in Spain since before the ascendancy of the
    Roman Empire and had long suffered persecution, particularly after the
    Visigothic rulers accepted Catholicism in the 6th century.
    The Muslim conquest brought peace to the Spanish Jews, who came to
    occupy prominent positions as statesmen, physicians, financiers, and
    scholars. Jewish scholars contributed to the beginning of the
    Renaissance in Europe by their translations of Greek classics,
    brought for the first time to western Europe.
    The peaceful Spanish era ended in the middle of the 13th century,
    with the waning of Muslim domination in the Iberian Peninsula.
    Under the Catholic monarchs, Spanish Jews were forced into the lowly
    position of other European Jews. During the Middle Ages persecution of
    Jews in Christian countries was the rule. Much of this persecution was
    unleashed by mobs who condemned every Jew as one who had taken part
    in the martyrdom of Jesus. During the Crusades, thousands of Jews were
    massacred in the religious fervor of the period. In 1215 the Fourth
    Lateran Council of the Roman Catholic church, called by Pope Innocent III,
    proclaimed an official policy of restrictions, similar to the Code of Omar,
    and ordered all Jews to wear distinctive badges. Throughout Europe Jews were despised.
    In cities they were forced to live in special areas, called ghettos, and not
    permitted freedom of movement. During the 13th and 14th centuries several
    European monarchs filled their treasuries by confiscating Jewish property
    and expelling the owners. In 1290 King Edward I of England beggared and
    expelled the English Jews. King Charles VI of France followed the English
    example in 1394, virtually ending Jewish history in France until modern
    times. During the period of the so-called Black Death (14th century),
    massacres of Jews were common throughout Europe, on the charge that
    Jews had caused the plague by poisoning Christian wells. In Spain
    systematic persecution by the church resulted in mass conversions by
    Jews attempting to save their lives. In many cases, such conversions were
    merely outward; a class of converts called Marranos (Spanish, “swine”)
    arose, professing Roman Catholicism but adhering to Judaism in secret. The
    Spanish Inquisition, instituted in 1478, persecuted the Marranos, and in
    1492 Spain expelled the Jews. Their expulsion from Portugal followed in
    1497.
    The exiles from western Europe found refuge in the eastern part of the
    continent. Thousands of Spanish Jews migrated to European Turkey, which
    preserved the Islamic policy of toleration, and Constantinople became the site of the
    largest Jewish community in Europe during the 16th century. Most of
    the Jews expelled from England, France, Germany, and Switzerland settled in Poland and
    Russia; by 1648 the Polish community included more than 500,000 Jews.
    The Polish Jews came to possess their own autonomous organization within the Polish
    Kingdom and became the center of Jewish activity.
    Then came the persecutions of 1648-58, carried out by followers of
    Bohdan Khmelnytsky (1595?-1657), leader of the cossacks in the Ukraine,
    in which countless Jewish communities of Poland were destroyed, and
    a decline of eastern European Jewry was initiated. Jews—then being barred from the professions,
    craft guilds, farming, and large commercial enterprises—were forced
    to live by petty commerce.
    Jews in Modern Life
    By the end of the 16th century only remnants of the old Jewish
    communities remained in western Europe.
    The Reformation and the French Revolution
    With the gradual increase in political and social freedom following
    the Protestant Reformation, however, tolerance for Jews was reestablished in
    the West. The new freedom came first to England, where the migration of
    Jews was encouraged, after 1650, by the Commonwealth under the
    military and political leader Oliver Cromwell. Jews were also encouraged
    to settle in the English colonies in America by such influential
    men as the philosopher John Locke and the colonial preacher Roger
    Williams. In France the Jews were enfranchised by the National Assembly
    in 1791, as part of the democratic concepts of the French Revolution,
    and Napoleon, during his military campaigns, opened ghettos and
    emancipated the Jews as he marched across Europe.
    A revival of repression occurred after 1815,
    when the states once subject to Napoleon refused to adopt his
    policies, including that of Jewish emancipation, which they regarded
    as a tendency to liberalism. This temporary reaction,
    however, lasted only for a few decades, and in the 1860s
    Jewish emancipation in western Europe was nominally secure.
    Eastern European Persecution
    In eastern Europe, on the other hand, the previous policy of
    Jewish tolerance was reversed, and Poland and Russia
    instituted official policies of Jewish persecution to offset
    any possible liberal tendencies. Such persecution equaled that
    inflicted on medieval Jews, particularly after the partition of Poland
    and the incorporation of eastern Poland into the Russian Empire between
    1772 and 1796. The new Russian territory contained most of
    the Polish Jews, for whom severe restrictions were laid down.
    Jews were forbidden to live outside specific areas, and their educational
    and occupational opportunities were rigidly circumscribed. In addition, the
    imperial government encouraged and even financed periodic massacres
    of Jews, called pogroms, in order to divert the attention of
    the Russian populace from their discontent with the feudalistic
    system still prevailing in the late 19th century.
    The government instituted even sterner anti-Jewish measures as
    it tried to isolate and render ineffective any possible political
    influence by Russian Jews, who were importing western European
    ideas and knowledge into Russia. This intense persecution endured
    until the Russian Revolution, which overthrew the czarist
    regime in 1917. As a result of the pogroms, about 2 million Jews
    immigrated to the U.S., between 1890 and the end of World War I,
    from areas under Russian control. Other colonies of eastern European Jews
    were founded in Canada, South America (notably in Argentina), the
    Union of South Africa, and Palestine.
    Jews in the Western Hemisphere
    Jewish immigration to the western hemisphere began almost
    immediately after the founding of the first American colonies.
    Numerous Sephardic Jews (of Spanish or Portuguese descent)
    first settled in Brazil; only Marranos were permitted,
    however, and persecution by the Inquisition resulted in
    their subsequent flight from Brazil. During the
    greater part of the 19th century, most Jewish immigrants to the U.S.
    came from Germany, after 1815 as a result of anti-Jewish feeling following
    the downfall of Napoleon, and after 1848 following an unsuccessful German revolution. Among
    these German-Jewish families were those of U.S. Senator Judah P. Benjamin,
    who became a leading figure in the Confederate cabinet,
    and Isaac Mayer Wise, the organizer of American Reform Judaism.
    By 1880 about 250,000 Jews lived in the U.S. These early immigrants had
    come either as separate individuals or in family groups.
    During the next 40 years almost 3 million Jews came to the
    United States, mainly from eastern Europe. This flood of immigrants, however,
    constituted the population of entire communities and even provinces,
    which preserved their communal identity on settling in the large cities
    along the Atlantic coast.
    Anti-Semitism
    World events in the late 19th century indirectly aided the political
    hopes engendered by the Haskalah. In Germany and France, particularly,
    a movement opposing the Jews came into being. It was called anti-Semitism,
    because its followers based their opposition not on the Jewish religion
    but on what they considered the Jewish race: the Semites.
    Political parties were formed in such countries as Germany, France, Austria,
    and Hungary to keep Jews from occupying positions of eminence.
    In France, anti-Semitism became a predominant political issue with the
    so-called Dreyfus affair, which began with the trial,
    on false evidence, of a Jewish army officer, Alfred Dreyfus
    (1859-1935). One of the spectators at the Dreyfus trial,
    an Austrian writer named Theodor Herzl, became convinced that the only
    solution to the problem of anti-Semitism was a Jewish national state.
    In 1896 Herzl became the founder of political Zionism.
    For the next 50 years the Zionist organization fought and planned to
    achieve its ambition, finally realized in the state of Israel.
    During the first half of the 20th century, and particularly in the period between
    the two world wars, anti-Semitism became a dominant force in European
    politics, notably in Germany. In the 1930s the growth of National Socialism,
    incorporating anti-Semitic doctrines, threatened all Jews, many of whom considered
    themselves not Jews but assimilated members of various national groups.
    During the supremacy of the National Socialists in western Europe,
    an estimated 6 million European Jews were slaughtered, both in Germany and
    in German-controlled states. This period of persecution and extermination
    of European Jews is called the Holocaust.
    In the last century they were massacred by german nazis and hitler
    And now they are inflicted by severe torment at the hands of palerstinans who are making suicide bombing against them every now and then
    .MAY ALLAH GRANT ME SHAHADA AND MAKE ME DIE AT A STONE THROW DISTANCE FROM YHE HOLY LAND
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