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    Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) and Jews

    Many of us may already know this, but just intended as a refresher; from The Prophet of Islam and the Jews, by Faysal S. Burhan (Michael D. Berdine, ed.)

    Historians (see Sahih Bukhari, Tradition Number 1311) report that as a funeral of a Jew passed before Prophet Muhammad [peace and blessings be upon him], as a sign of respect he stood up. In doing this, he showed respect and shared in the feeling of sorrow with Jewish family and community. "Why did you stand up for a Jewish funeral?" he was asked. The Prophet replied: "Is it not a human soul?"
    ---

    Upon learning of the sickness of his Jewish neighbor, Prophet Muhammad [peace and blessings be upon him] paid him a visit. During the visit the Prophet [peace and blessings be upon him] asked the young man to accept Islam. The young man looked at his father for a permission. The father assented and the young man accepted Islam. (See Sahih Bukhari, Tradition Number 1356).
    ---

    Getting closer to others, and making your enemy your friend is the way of Prophet Muhammad [peace and blessings be upon him]. To accomplish this, Prophet Muhammad [peace and blessings be upon him] utilized the traditional Arabian way of making alliance through marriage. Any time a person marries from a clan outside of his own, he becomes honored by every member of the clan, and protected by the entire tribe of the bride. To show his nearness and trustworthiness to the Jews, he married one of their own. Her name was Sufiah Bint Alnudair, the daughter of the leader of the Nudair tribe.
    ---

    For several days, at the outskirts of Medina, awaiting eagerly the arrival of Prophet Muhammad [peace and blessings be upon him] and his companion from Makkah, was a small group of Muslims. Also near by was a Jew, Abdullah Bin Salaam, picking dates off a palm tree with his aunt on the ground assisting him. Abdullah was in a better position to spot the incoming from a far distance. Therefore, he was the first to see the Prophet [peace and blessings be upon him] and his companion coming. Upon this, he became overwhelmed with excitement, calling loudly, "Muhammad has arrived, God is great!" Upon this, his aunt told him to quiet down saying, "If he was Moses son of Imran, you would not have shouted as loud." Abdullah responded, "Oh my aunt by Allah, he is (only) the brother of Moses, son of Imran and is on his faith." She asked, "Is he the expected Prophet we have been told about (in the Torah)? He said, "Yes".

    This historical event is only a natural reflection of what is in the inner-hearts of many of the true believers in God. Abdullah and other Jewish leaders and individuals accepted Islam along with many Arabian tribes resident in the city of Medina. (See A. Alhalabi, Alsirah Alhalabiyah, Volume 2, page 121.)
    ---

    Jewish communities in Anatolia flourished and continued to prosper throughout the Ottomans anconquest. When the Ottomans captured Busra in 1324 and made it their capital, they found a Jewish community oppressed under Byzantine rule. The Jews welcomed the ottomans as saviors. Sultan Orhan gave them permission to build the Etz ha-Hayyim (Tree of Life) synagogue which remained in service until 50 years ago.

    Early in the 14th century, when the Ottomans had established their capital at Edirne, Jews from Europe, including Karaites, migrated there.-(Mark Allen Epstein, The Ottoman Jewish Communities and their Role in the 15th and 16th Centuries.) Similarly, Jews expelled from Hungary in 1376, from France by Charles VI in September 1394, and from Sicily early in the 15th century found refuge in the Ottoman Empire. In the 1420s, Jews from Salonika then under Venetian control fled to Edirne. -(Josef Nehama, Histoire des Israeliies de Salonique.)

    Ottoman rule was much kinder than Byzantine rule had been. In fact, from the early 15th century on, the Ottomans actively encouraged Jewish immigration. A letter sent by Rabbi Yitzhak Safati (from Edirne) to Jewish communities in Europe in the first part of the century "invited his coreligionists to leave the torments they were enduring in Christendom and to seek safety and prosperity in Turkey." -(Bernard Lewis, The Jews of Islam.)

    When Mehmet II "the Conqueror" took Constantinople in 1453, he encountered an oppressed Romaniot (Byzantine) Jewish community which welcomed him with enthusiasm. Sultan Mehmet II issued a proclamation to all Jews "to ascend the site of the Imperial Throne, to dwell in the best of the land, each beneath his Dine and his fig tree, with silver and with gold, with wealth" -(Encyclopedia Judaica, Volume 16, page 1532). In 1470, Jews expelled from Bavaria by Ludvig X found refuge in the Ottoman Empire -(Avram Galante, Histiore des Juifs d'Istanbul, Volume 2).

    On the midnight of August 2nd 1492, when Columbus embarked on what would become his most famous expedition to the New World, his fleet departed from the relatively unknown seaport of Palos because the shipping lanes of Cadiz and Seville were clogged with Sephardic Jews expelled from Spain by the Edict of Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand of Spain.

    Sultan Bayazid II's offer of refuge gave new hope to the persecuted Sephardim. In 1492, the Sultan ordered the governors of the provinces of the Ottoman Empire "not to refuse the Jews entry or cause them difficulties, but to receive them cordially" -(Abraham Danon, in the Review Yossef Daath No.4). According to Bernard Lewis, "the Jews were not just permitted to settle in the Ottoman lands, but were encouraged, assisted and sometimes even compelled."

    Immanual Abobab attributes to Bayazid II the famous remark that "the Catholic monarch Ferdinand was wrongly considered as wise, since he impoverished Spain by the expulsion of the Jews, and enriched Turkey" -(Immanual Abobab, A Consolacam as Tribulacoes de Israel, III Israel).

    Over the centuries an increasing number of European Jews, escaping persecution in their native countries, settled in the Ottoman Empire. In 1537 the Jews expelled from Apulia (Italy) after the city fell under Papal control and, in 1542 those expelled from Bohemia by King Ferdinand found a safe haven in the Ottoman Empire -(H. Graetz, History of the Jews). In March of 1556, Sultan Sulayman "the Magnificent" wrote a letter to Pope Paul IV asking for immediate release of the Acona Marranos, whom he declared to be Ottoman citizens. The Pope had no alternative but to release them, the Ottoman Empire being the "Superpower" of that time.

    In his book, More in Common than you Think, Bridge Between Islam and Christianity, Dr. William Baker elaborates about the fact that Muslims view the Torah and the New Testament as inspired revelations of God and that Islam neither targeted the Jews nor Judaism. He said, "It is a fact of history that when the Jews were being persecuted in Europe during the middle ages they found peace, harmony, and acceptance among the Muslim people of Spain. In fact, this was the era of Jewish history that they themselves refer to as "the golden age." In the famous treaties by Rabbi Minken, he says of this era: "It was Muslim Spain, the only land the Jew knew in nearly a thousand years of the dispersion, which made the genius of physician Moses Maimonides possible."
    ---

    In conclusion, The Muslims and Jews co-existed in harmony during the rise of Islam and beyond. Islam is a friendly religion to all "It was Muslim Spain, the only land the Jew knew in nearly a thousand years of the dispersion, which made the genius of physician Moses Maimonides possible". Tolerance and virtue are indivisible parts of the Muslim's faith. "The Jews of Banu 'Awf are one nation with the Muslims; the Jews have their religion and the Muslims have theirs". These principles and historical events should draw the pace for better relations and more peaceful future for both Jewish and Muslim Communities.

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    Verily in the remembrance of Allah do hearts find rest ~ XIII.28

    #2

    Tolerance and virtue are indivisible parts of the Muslim's faith.
    Thank YOU Nadia. I figure the above statement can easily conclude the entire post. The jews accepted the Prophet(PBUH) when he had entered Madinah as a Prophet, and even though they later turned against the Prophet(PBUH) and started conspiring, the Prophet(PBUH)'s attitude was one of extreme generosity.

    Making a friend out of an enemy was the way of the Prophet(PBUH), unfortunately many of us have adopted the exact opposite, making an enemy out of a friend just because of a minor difference in belief.

    Jazakallah for sharing this.

    Comment


      #3
      Thank you for your comments, Ammar.

      There was a lot more to this chapter that I wanted to paste, but it was already quite long Masha'Allah. You are absolutely right about what occurred in Yathrib; his (pbuh) attitude had always been exemplary towards Jews - and towards Christians as well (if we remember what occurred when some Muslims fled to Abyssinia to seek protection under the then Christian king, Negus).

      In summary it was Prophet Muhammad's (pbuh) unique way of showing such kindness to even his staunchest foes that led substantial nonMuslims to revert to Islam... What volumes it speaks of, and how tragic it is, that we have lost sight of one of his most important teachings.

      ------------------
      Verily in the remembrance of Allah do hearts find rest ~ XIII.28

      Comment


        #4
        Why do people need examples of what Prophet Mohammad did concerning Jews? Isnt it just common freaking sense to respect everyone?

        This is 2002 and not 637. Get with the times.

        Comment


          #5
          Nadia, many thanks for sharing this article.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by NYAhmadi:
            Why do people need examples of what Prophet Mohammad did concerning Jews? Isnt it just common freaking sense to respect everyone?

            This is 2002 and not 637. Get with the times.
            DO you have a problem if Prophet Muhammad is exemplified here, its to show that being a muslim does not mean you can't have non muslim friends.

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            Its our Wits that make us MEN .... 'Braveheart'

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by NYAhmadi:
              Why do people need examples of what Prophet Mohammad did concerning Jews? Isnt it just common freaking sense to respect everyone?

              This is 2002 and not 637. Get with the times.
              NYA,

              It should not even merit reminding but if you have a problem with this article then there is a simple solution: don't read it.

              Comment


                #8
                Nadia, do you mean to say that if Prophet Mohammad did not show respect to the Jews, you wouldnt either? Is that what you are implying?

                If you dont want people to read what you post, then dont post it. I can suggest something to do with it if you wish.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Quit this charade Nya. If you dont like the article than at least try to make a positive contribition to this thread by discussing the topic in a more friendly manner. That is what gupshup is about. Otherwise as Nadia has correctly stated 'dont read it'.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Especially for NYA - my all-time favourite Guppie on Gupshup:

                    Muslims and Jews: a historical perspective that reveals surprises

                    Once upon a time, a widely circulated Jewish document described Islam as "an act of God's Mercy".

                    Also, Jews in the near East, north Africa and Spain threw their support behind advancing Muslim Arab armies.

                    No, these aren't fairy tales or propaganda. The relationship between Muslims and Jews really was that cooperative and marked by peaceful coexistence.

                    Just ask Khalid Siddiqi of the Islamic Education and Information Center in San Jose, California where he also teaches Islamic Studies and Arabic at Chabot College and Ohlone College.

                    Siddiqi notes that the first quote above is from S. D. Goitein's book Jews and Arabs. The second is from Merlin Swartz's 'The Position of Jews in Arab lands following the rise of Islam' (reprinted from The Muslim World. Hartford Seminary Foundation LXI1970).

                    Swartz also says the Muslim Arab conquest marked the dawn of a new era. Those forces that had led to the progressive isolation and disruption of Jewish life were not only checked they were dramatically reversed.

                    In an interview with Sound Vision, Siddiqi gave numerous examples of Jews flourishing under Muslim rule in places like Spain, Morocco, North African in general and various parts of the Middle East.

                    Siddiqi points out that Islam as a religion has given specific guidelines for the followers of Islam to base their relationship with any non-Muslim. These include People of Scripture, like the Jews, people who belong to other religions, and even atheists. Non-Muslims must be treated on the basis of Birr (kindness) and Qist (justice), as referred to Surah 60 verse 8 of the Quran.

                    It started at the time of the Prophet Mohammad (peace and blessings be upon him)

                    The peaceful coexistence of Muslims and Jews began at the time of the Prophet.

                    Siddiqi notes that the Jews welcomed the Prophet when he arrived in Madinah at the time of Hijrah (migration), along with the rest of the city's inhabitants.

                    But the Prophet had begun the step towards good relations with Jewish and other communities in Madinah even before getting there.

                    After receiving an invitation to Madinah from one of the city's tribes that had accepted Islam, the Prophet signed treaties with the city's Jewish, Christian and polytheist tribes before he arrived there.

                    These treaties clearly laid out responsibilities of each of the parties. It was based on these that the Prophet established the Mithaq al Madinah, the constitution of Madinah.

                    Siddiqi says this was the first constitution of the world and one of the greatest political documents ever prepared by any human being. It is the oldest surviving constitution of any state.

                    Under this constitution, any Jew who followed the Muslims was entitled to their assistance and the same rights as anyone of them without any injustice or partisanship.

                    It said the Jews are an Ummah (community of believers) alongside the Muslims. The Jews have their religion and the Muslims theirs. As well, it noted that each will assist one another against any violation of this covenant.

                    But the leadership of different Jewish tribes tried to collaborate with the enemies of Islam in Makkah in violation of the contract they signed with the Prophet. This has been mentioned in chapter 59 (al Hashr) of the Quran, says Siddiqi.

                    Jews during the Muslim era

                    Despite this early breach of contract, there are still numerous examples from Muslim history of Muslim-Jewish cooperation and coexistence.

                    Siddiqi gave examples of how Muslim Spain, which was a "golden era" of creativity and advancement for Muslims was also one for Jews.

                    While Europe was in its Dark Ages and Jews were reviled there, Muslims in Spain during the same period worked side by side with Jews in developing literature, science and art.

                    Together, they translated classical Greek texts into Arabic. This task later helped Europe move out of the Dark Ages and into the Renaissance.

                    Jews flourished under Muslim rule in Egypt as well, where they achieved very high positions in government.

                    Siddiqi quotes some lines from an Arab poet of that time, to illustrate: 'Today the Jews have reached the summit of their hopes and have become aristocrats. Power and riches have they and from them councilors and princes are chosen'.

                    Today: the forced expulsion of Palestinians from their homeland has destroyed good Muslim-Jewish relations

                    So what happened?

                    Although not the only cause, a large part of the deterioration in Muslim-Jewish relations comes from the emergence of Zionism, the forced expulsion of Palestinians from their homeland by Zionist Jews and British colonizers, as well as their continuing oppression.

                    Siddiqi says, "while this reaction results in anti-Jewish feeling it must be seen in its proper historical context. It must be remembered that anti-Jewish sentiments in so far as it is to be found in the contemporary Arab world is strictly a modern phenomenon and one that runs counter to the time honored Islamic tradition of fraternity and tolerance.

                    "The very widespread popular notion that present day Arab-Jewish hostility is but another chapter in a long history of mutual animosity is totally false. If there is one thing the past makes clear it is precisely that Arabs and Jews can live together peacefully and in a mutually beneficial relationship. History also makes it very clear that they are the heirs to the Islamic tradition of openness and tolerance."

                    The key to reestablishing good relations between Muslims and Jews again is justice, notes Siddiqui. This principle is foreign to neither Islam nor Judaism.

                    In Islam, standing up for justice, he points out, must be done even if it is against ourselves, our parents, our kin, the rich or the poor. This is clearly mentioned in the Quran (4:135).

                    Siddiqi points out that the emphasis on justice is also mentioned in Jewish scripture in the prophecies of Michael in chapter three: "Zion shall be redeemed with justice and by those who will come to her with righteousness."

                    ------------------
                    Verily in the remembrance of Allah do hearts find rest ~ XIII.28

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Nadia, allow me to put some senses in your lice infested thick head.

                      I am well aware of the inquisitions, the Jewry of the Sophards (I have a First in both Ancient and Modern history), the Jewish/Muslim relations over the centuries, blah blah blah.

                      Now, my comment to you was, if you look at the subject heading Prophet Mohammad and Jews. Do you know, how insulting that might be to a Jew? Imagine this: Larry Flynt and Muslims. When he stood up to show respect, it wasnt because the deceased was a Jew, but because he was a Human Being, just like the Prophet Mohammad himself. Mohammad didnt say, o, there is a dead Jew, lets stand up. It was meant as a customary gesture to show respect. It could have been a dead drunken Irish and Prophet would have done the same thing.

                      By insinuating that somehow Jews are any less of a humans is downright racist and self-indulgent idiocy. Dont go around telling Jews that our Prophet stood up because he saw the procession of a dead Jew. So what? They will say.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by NYAhmadi:
                        allow me to put some senses in your lice infested thick head.

                        Nya, making 'inane' and very distasteful comments will not gain you any respect on these boards.

                        I am well aware of the inquisitions, the Jewry of the Sophards (I have a First in both Ancient and Modern history), the Jewish/Muslim relations over the centuries, blah blah blah.

                        So what, do you want a round of applause !

                        Now, my comment to you was, if you look at the subject heading Prophet Mohammad and Jews. Do you know, how insulting that might be to a Jew?

                        It is not insulting anybody. You are making baseless assumptions as far I am concerned. Nadia has followed the right procedure by listing the actual title of the article, so whats your problem Nya ???

                        Imagine this: Larry Flynt and Muslims. When he stood up to show respect, it wasnt because the deceased was a Jew, but because he was a Human Being, just like the Prophet Mohammad himself. Mohammad didnt say, o, there is a dead Jew, lets stand up. It was meant as a customary gesture to show respect. It could have been a dead drunken Irish and Prophet would have done the same thing.

                        This article is about how the prophet (pbuh) gave great respect to the jewish people. It is not about making up hypothetical scenarios which you seem to be enjoy doing!!!

                        By insinuating that somehow Jews are any less of a humans is downright racist and self-indulgent idiocy.

                        The only person who is making false insinuations is you Nya ! :-P .You should learn to live by your own advice before telling others what to do!!
                        [This message has been edited by Dil he Pakistani (edited June 05, 2002).]

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Dil, I see you are craving for some attention. , I dont need any respect from you. Kapeesh!




                          [This message has been edited by Akif (edited June 06, 2002).]

                          Comment


                            #14
                            It seems your behaving like an ignaramus again Nya! :-P




                            [This message has been edited by Dil he Pakistani (edited June 05, 2002).]

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Dil..do you really think I care about what you think? Come on, be real.

                              Comment

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