Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

British court annuls arranged marriage between Pakistanis

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    British court annuls arranged marriage between Pakistanis

    Court annuls arranged marriage, Kirsty Scott
    24 April 2002, The Guardian

    A teenage bride has had her arranged marriage annulled in a rare legal move after a judge ruled she had been "deceived and frightened" into marrying.

    Aneeka Sohrab, from Glasgow, was a 16-year-old schoolgirl when she was forced to marry Raja Khan, a 19-year-old student who had arrived in the UK from Pakistan three months before the wedding in a Glasgow mosque in December 1998. Miss Sohrab, 19, from the Pollokshields area of Glasgow, had told the court of session in Edinburgh that she was informed of the wedding the week before it was to take place and refused to go through with it.

    She said her parents had met Mr Khan's parents in Bury in Lancashire and had agreed that the pair should marry. When she rebelled, she said she was told she would bring disgrace to her family and would have to be sent to Pakistan. Her mother also threatened suicide. The marriage broke down and Miss Sohrab left her husband within months of the wedding. She had asked the court to rule that the marriage was not valid because she had been put under duress. Mr Khan, who had contested the action, claimed Miss Sohrab had been happy to go through with the wedding.

    In his written judgment yesterday, the judge, Lord McEwan, granted an order annull-ing the "pretended marriage." He said he was satisfied that Miss Sohrab's will had been broken and the pressure put on her to agree to the union was more than a 16-year-old girl could bear. Lord McEwan said it had been clear from a video of the wedding ceremony shown to the court that Miss Sohrab was distressed at the proceedings. "In spite of her glorious robes she looked a very unhappy girl," the judge said. Miss Sohrab had told the court she was "silently protesting" throughout the ceremony.

    Lord McEwan said he was very sorry for both the bride and groom and feared their lives had been blighted by the experience. He said both had been dominated by their parents, especially their mothers, and the threat of Miss Sohrab's mother to commit suicide was enough to force her to wed.

    "These mothers were of a different generation and were both themselves in arranged marriages," he said. "No doubt they thought they were doing the best for their children.

    "However, what they both did was put an intolerable pressure on both of these young people at an age when neither was able to take an informed decision about their future or act in any way independently.

    "It may be that in the multi-cultural society in which we now live such situations will continue to arise where ancient ethics clash with the spirit of 21st century children of a new generation and western ideas, language and what these days passes for culture. There is inevitable tension, and clashes will happen."


    After the court decision, Miss Sohrab's solicitor, Carolyn MacBride, issued a statement on behalf of her client.

    "Miss Sohrab is very relieved at the decision," said Miss MacBride. "She is happy this allows her to move on with her life. She does not intend to make further comment."

    Bashir Maan, the Scottish representative on the Muslim Council of Great Britain, said: "If it hasn't been working and one of the parties isn't happy, there's no harm in annulling the marriage. The shariah (Islamic law) does not force the parties to live together. It tells them that the best thing is to try to get on and make up or get the help of a third party, the parents of both sides."

    #2
    why not islamic priest who conducts the marriage ask the girl weather she wants to marry this man. why it should be decided
    be secular court?

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by rvikz:
      why not islamic priest who conducts the marriage ask the girl weather she wants to marry this man. why it should be decided
      be secular court?
      Because it is widely accepted that "parents know what is best for their child", and this is supported by the society including the "Islamic Scholars and Mullah's" (priest).

      Even if an Islamic Scholar invalidates a marriage in which the girl or the boy or even both were forced, do you think any one would accept and implement the judgement of the Islamic Scholar, as effectively as the judgement of a secular court?

      Comment

      Working...
      X