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    Sufis? Jews?

    AoA, I was going through my religions text book and found some stuff on Sufis. According to the text, Sufis are both Sunnis and Shias and they aren't considered a separate sect. There isn't much in the text so i was wondering if someone could tell me what Sufism is all about??? It's origin/practices and how it differs from the mainstream Sunni/Shias beleifs.

    As for the jews, do they believe in Bible or does Bible have parts of the Torah? B/c i remember in the text they mention a lot about Bible.. or is it just tht Torah is similar to Bible/Christianity?

    *confused

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    "I put my trust in Allah, my Lord and your Lord! There is not a moving creature, but He has a grasp of its forelock. Verily, my Lord is on the straight path. (The truth)"
    (11:55-56)

    "...Indeed my prayer, my sacrifice, my living and my dying are for Allaah, the Lord of the worlds" (6:162)

    #2
    Sufism is a great and mystical form of Islam. In Pakistan and India, most Muslims follow some aspect of Sufism. Exception to this are Wahabi nutcases imported from Saudi Arabia.

    Sufism is aslo deeply entrenched in Sindh, Kashmir, Punjab and even in NWFP.

    Comment


      #3
      Jews believe in the Old Testament of the Bible.
      Muslims are so good at dividing that they can divide the atom. If you see two Muslims, probably they belong to 3 parties.
      Al-Ghazali

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by mAd_ScIeNtIsT:
        Jews believe in the Old Testament of the Bible.
        No wonder the Bible's mentioned so much under Judaism. In fact, Bible's been mentioned more than Torah in my text book.

        Jazallah khair

        Comment


          #5
          According to my limited knowledge, we use the word "Bible" to refer to both Old Testament and New Testament.

          Old Testament = Torah
          New Testament = Injeel

          As far as jews are concerned, they consider Jesus Christ (AS) as a heretic jew, so obviously they don't consider New Testament as a valid divine book, but christians believe in both Jesus and Moses (AS).


          Re: Sufis, there is a lot of material posted right here on sufis. Just do a search on the word 'Sufi' in Religion forum and you will find a immense information.

          Comment


            #6
            Pristine: thnkx!

            Does that mean Christians believe in Torah (Old Testament) since they believe in Moses (AS) or NO?

            Old/New Testaments reminds me.. there were 4 holy/divine books revealed...

            1.Torah
            2.Injeel
            3.Quran

            4th one's Zaboor right? What happened to that one.. I've never really heard of that book at all...

            Comment


              #7
              Here are two links that can be of good help:


              Disclaimer: I am not responsible for the accuracy of the information on the above mentioned links!
              I know that you believe that you understood what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
              - Robert McCloskey

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Sadiaa:
                Pristine: thnkx!

                Does that mean Christians believe in Torah (Old Testament) since they believe in Moses (AS) or NO?

                Old/New Testaments reminds me.. there were 4 holy/divine books revealed...

                1.Torah
                2.Injeel
                3.Quran

                4th one's Zaboor right? What happened to that one.. I've never really heard of that book at all...
                Christians don't argue about the validity of the Old Testament, but believe that where there is any conflict between the message of the New Testament and the Old, the New Testament wins out as the beliefs therein supercede the Old Testament.

                The Zaboor mean "Psalms" in English. They have been incorporated as one of the books of the Old Testament (the Old Testment being a compilation of dozens of books).
                Muslims are so good at dividing that they can divide the atom. If you see two Muslims, probably they belong to 3 parties.
                Al-Ghazali

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Sadiaa:

                  Old/New Testaments reminds me.. there were 4 holy/divine books revealed...

                  1.Torah
                  2.Injeel
                  3.Quran

                  4th one's Zaboor right? What happened to that one.. I've never really heard of that book at all...

                  It's also called the psalms, which has been added to the Bible.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Faraz Mir:
                    Sufism is a great and mystical form of Islam. In Pakistan and India, most Muslims follow some aspect of Sufism. Exception to this are Wahabi nutcases imported from Saudi Arabia.

                    Sufism is aslo deeply entrenched in Sindh, Kashmir, Punjab and even in NWFP.
                    hmmmm....yeah RIGHT!
                    can you plz elaborate on that.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Sadiaa here is just a few things about them, i didn't want to copy/paste the whole thing, there is alot of information, i'll just send it to you when i see you online.. hope this helps a little

                      SUFISM :ITS ORIGINS

                      The word Sufi is most likely to be derived from the Arabic word "soof", meaning wool. This is because of the Sufi habit of wearing woolen coats, a designation of their initiation into the Sufi order. The early Sufi orders considered the wearing of this coat as an imitation of Isa bin Maryam (Jesus). In reply to this, Ibn Taymiyyah said: "There are a people who have chosen and preferred the wearing of woolen clothes, claiming that they want to resemble al-Maseeh ibn Maryam. But the way of our Prophet is more beloved to us, and the Prophet (s.a.w.s) used to wear cotton and other garments."1

                      Sufism is known as "Islamic Mysticism," in which Muslims seek to find divine love and knowledge through direct personal experience of God2. Mysticism is defined as the experience of mystical union or direct communion with ultimate reality, and the belief that direct knowledge of God, spiritual truth, or ultimate reality can be attained through subjective experience (as intuition or insight)3

                      Both the terms Sufi and Sufism and Sufi beliefs have no basis from the traditional Islamic sources of the Qur'an and Sunnah, a fact even admitted by themselves. Rather, Sufism is in essence a conglomerate consisting of extracts from a multitude of other religions with which Sufi's interacted.

                      During the primary stages of Sufism, Sufis were characterised by their particular attachment to zikr (remembrance of Allah) and asceticism (seclusion), as well as the beginning of innovated practices to 'aid' in the religious practices. Yet even at the early stage of Sufism, before their involvement in innovated rituals and structured orders, the scholars warned the masses of the extremity of Sufi practices. Imam Al-Shafi' had the opinion that "If a person exercised Sufism (Tasawafa) at the beginning of the day, he doesn't come at Zuhur except an idiot". Imam Malik and Ahmad bin Hanbal also shared similar ideas on this new movement which emanated from Basrah, Iraq.

                      Although it began as a move towards excessive Ibaadah, such practices were doomed to lead to corruption, since their basis did not come from authentic religious doctrines, but rather from exaggerated human emotions.

                      Sufism as an organised movement arose among pious Muslims as a reaction against the worldliness of the early Umayyad period (AD 661-750)4. The Sufis exploited the chaotic state of affairs that existed during the fifth and sixth centuries A.H. and invited people to follow their way, alleging that the remedy to this chaos was conformity to the guidance of their order's Sheikhs. Dar al-Majnoon was established during the reign of Khalifah Ma'moon, where he invited the scholars of the Romans and Greeks to meet with the Muslims and 'discuss' their respective positions. This provided the perfect breeding ground for the synthesis between Islam and Pagan theology, to produce the Sufism of the like of Ibn Arabi.
                      With the demise of the Companions and their successors, the door became open for the distortion of Islamic Principles. The enemies of Islam had already burrowed deep into the ranks of Muslims and rapidly caused Fitnah through their spreading of forged hadith and subsequently created new sects such as the Khawaarij and Mu'tazilah.

                      Sufism gained its breeding ground during this period, whereby it gained its support from the Dynastic Rulers, who had deviated from Islam to the extent whereby magic was used as entertainment in their courts, even though magic is considered as Kufr in Islam.5 During this period, Sufism developed its Shi'a flavour, indeed the roots of contemporary Sufism have been traced back to Shi'a origins (see later).

                      Sufi ideology and thinking flourished during the times of the likes of Muhyiddin Ibn Arabi, Jalal Ad Din Rumi, and Imam Ghazali. Their translation of Greek philosophical works into Arabic during the third Islamic century left an indelible mark on many aspects of Sufism, resulting in Greek pantheism becoming an integral part of Sufi doctrine. Pagan practices such as Saint worshipping, the use of magic and holding venerance towards their Sheikh overtook the Orthodox practices of Islam and had little resemblance to the Islam left by our Prophet (s.a.w).

                      By examining the mystic doctrines of Christianity, Hinduism, Taoism and other religions, it becomes clear how closer Sufism is to these religions than to Islam. In fact, Sufism is never characterised under "Islam" in any system of catalogue, but rather under 'Mysticism'.

                      Sharda highlights these unsurprising similarities by stating that: "After the fall of Muslim orthodoxy from power at the centre of India for about a century, due to the invasion of Timur, the Sufi became free from the control of the Muslim orthodoxy and consorted with Hindu saints, who influenced them to an amazing extent. The Sufi adopted Monism and wifely devotion from the Vaishnava Vedantic school and Bhakti and Yogic practices from the Vaishnava Vedantic school. By that time, the popularity of the Vedantic pantheism among the Sufis had reached its zenith."

                      Comment


                        #12
                        u can find some views on sufism in this thread http://www3.pak.org/gupshup/Forum13/HTML/004401.html ....

                        i quote from my post in that thread....

                        sufism is usually about one person leaving the world and going off to a far off place where he lives alone, away from the evils of the world trying to get close to Allah....

                        however this is not what Islam teaches us....
                        society is an integral part of one's life....
                        huqooq-al-ibaad (the rights of the people) r more emphasised than the huqooq-Allah (the rights of Allah) and when one leaves his family, society he is not fulfilling any of those huqooq....

                        and the way of getting close to Allah is thru the five prayers as He has mentioned in Quran....

                        the conept of monks (rahib) and all is derived rom religions like Hinduism and Buddhism....



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                        "Our Lord! forgive us our sins and anything we may have done that transgressed our duty; establish our feet firmly and help us against those that resist faith." Quran(3:147)
                        Both Halal & Haram r evident but between them r doubtful things, most ppl have no knowledge about them. So whoever saves himself from suspicious things saves his religion & honor, & whoever indulges in suspicious things indulges in Haram.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Faraz Mir:
                          Sufism is a great and mystical form of Islam. In Pakistan and India, most Muslims follow some aspect of Sufism. Exception to this are Wahabi nutcases imported from Saudi Arabia.

                          Sufism is aslo deeply entrenched in Sindh, Kashmir, Punjab and even in NWFP.


                          ur peers feed u 2 much barelvi bull****



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                          Pakistan Zindabad!

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Jazakallah khair all!

                            Aapki: thnkx sis! I was skimming thru the same site last nite ...

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Shehzaada:


                              ur peers feed u 2 much barelvi bull****


                              HAHAHAHAHAHA ...LOL LOL LOL..!!!!

                              In any case, (NOT referring to you Shehzaada), let's not be too hard on the Barelvis, they are also Sunni Muslims. Yes, when the commit shirk, bid'ah or anyother unIslamic practise, we need to respond appropriately.

                              Comment

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