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    Hinduism To Islam

    heart warming story of a bro who converted to Islam.....

    My parents are Hindus from the Punjab, and though I was brought up with the basic Hindu beliefs, I went to a Christian, Church of England school from Primary school age. So even though I knew the whole of Hinduism, I could never accept or understand all the idolatry to do with the monkeys and elephants and so on, so my underlying belief was really in Christianity. I always considered myself a Christian, though I never got baptised. My parents had strong links with the Sikh community, and since there are not many centres for the Punjabi Hindu community in Bolton where they live, we always used to go to the Sikh temples (the Gurduwaras) where we used to participate in their functions, though I can't say I ever had any positive spiritual feeling from these events.

    Basically, I have since childhood always been interested in religion, always believing that there was one God, and this was certainly partly from my parents, who also were religious within their own tradition.

    Having said that, however, they are directed mainly towards Sikhism nowadays, and today they follow a Guru, and are more or less completely within the scope of that religion .

    I didn't start questioning my belief in Christianity until I went to secondary school and started meeting Muslims, where more or less all my friends were Muslims. After school they were always going to the mosque, and they would have their Qur'ans with them, and they fasted in the month of Ramadhan - I remember having fun getting all their dinner tickets off them, and all this had an effect somewhere in the back of my mind. I could see that they were doing all these things with sincerity, so I realised that there was something behind this. I would just observe all these things and you sort of file things away in the back of your mind.

    One time when I was about thirteen years old I went to visit a friend of mine. He wasn't at home, but his older brother was there and he invited me in. We sat down and he asked me about my background and beliefs. When I finished my answer, he questioned me about my Christian beliefs, and made out the case for Islam, especially concerning the scientific accuracy of the Qur'an. Generally he gave a very inspiring explanation to me about the Deen, and looking back, the insight I gained from him that day was such that I could say that the belief entered my heart from then, for I left with the conviction that Islam was the true religion. I was buzzing until I got home, but then the momentum of my daily routines somehow put any further action onto the back-burner, and it wasn't until I got to college that I made any further progress.

    My friends there were also all Muslims, and I spent all my time with them and enjoyed their company, and they even used to say to me "One day you'll become Muslim". I never thought much about such comments, until a conversation with one particular friend who asked me outright - "Why don't you become Muslim?" For some reason I took it seriously this time, and decided to get hold of a Qur'an to find out what exactly was the message of Islam. So I started reading the Qur'an, and the more I read, the more I became convinced that this was really the word of God, and that it had to be the truth. Of course I didn't tell my parents at this stage, and I was careful to keep my belief a secret from them.

    Eventually they told me I would have to stop loafing around and make a contribution to the family business and help in the warehouse. I started running a warehouse on Bury New Road and it was from there that I made further enquiries through a friend, and got some books so that I could learn how to pray Salaah. Alhamdulillah, he started teaching me, and he got me books on Aqidah as well. I had these books hidden in my room at home, and I would wait until everyone was asleep and then would put on the light and start to read. I had so much love and appetite for this learning that I would stay awake like this every night to discover more and more about the deen. One night my father happened to go to the bathroom when it was very late, and he noticed that my light was on. He came into the room and caught me in my studies. Straight away he realised what it was all about, but he didn't make a big scene that night, deciding instead to leave it until the morning.

    The next morning broke like a storm, with aggressive questioning as both my parents flipped. They realised from my routines, which had seemed strange to them, that I was a practising Muslim. I used to come from work, go straight to the bathroom and then into my room for an hour or so - I prayed my Salaah all together at that time, not knowing any better. Big debates raged, as they told me I couldn't become a Muslim, that it was no good for the family etc. They tried bribing me, offering me a house, a wife , cars - anything to get me to leave Islam. But once that love for Islam comes into your heart, nothing can buy it, so I didn't accept any of their pleas.

    My parents were due to go to India at the time, and they said that they wouldn't go unless I renounced Islam. Now the month of Ramadhan was imminent, and I knew that if they were still around, they wouldn't let me do a single fast. So I decided to fob them off, and told them that I would leave Islam, just to get them out of the country. Once they had gone I was able to practise more easily, but when they found out that I was fasting, they told my aunts and uncles to throw me out of the house. They couldn't bring themselves to do it, though, and told me to wait until my parents returned. When they did come back, the debates and threats began again, until eventually they realised that I wasn't going to change. So they told me that I would have to leave home. They did it in a nice way, saying that I could take whatever I wanted from the house, and they gave me some money, but the bottom line was "Just go." The memory still hurts. Leaving home like that is not a normal thing, and it's not an easy thing to do. You leave your family, you leave your sisters, your brothers - it's not easy. Your parents, who have brought you up and cared for you throughout your whole life, who have never treated you badly, never done anything wrong to you, suddenly turn round and ask you to leave home. So I did. I left. I didn't want to leave, but I thought "Look, this is what I have to do for Islam", and I left. They said to me that they didn't want to see me or even to hear a word from me, and that I should go at least two hundred miles away to live.

    So I came to London with just my bag. I had a close friend from school living somewhere in Clapton, and I set about finding him. I searched at the mosque near where I thought he lived, and I explained my situation to the people that I found there. Not one of them offered to help me. Everyone passed me on, saying "Oh, go to the maulvi", then he said "Go to such and such a person", who in turn sent me elsewhere, basically, no-one wanted to know. Eventually, after wandering the streets for a few hours, I went to the police station and asked for help, saying I was homeless and had nowhere to go. Their 'help' was to direct me to the bus-stop outside. I could sleep there, they said. Anyway, I went back to the mosque to pray my Salaah, and a nephew of my friend was there who noticed me and took me back to their house to wait for my friend, who was at work at the time. Shukr wal hamdulillah, they took me in, and I stayed there 8 weeks until I sorted somewhere out for myself.

    Alhamdulillah, after the initial cut-off I gradually re-established some form of link with my family, and now I even have some quite good talks sometimes with my father about matters to do with Islam and so on. Nowadays they say to me, "You can live with us again if you want, and come back to the house - but become a normal Muslim." I say "What is a 'normal' Muslim to you?" "You know, like the ones we have got around here, clean-shaven, disco-going types. You can do all your practise in the house, why do you have to show everyone your Islam?" I tell them, "This is a normal Muslim, I don't know of any other sort of Muslim. Your Guru, whose picture you keep on your wall, he wears a turban, so why can't I wear one?" "Oh, people will laugh", they say. These sort of excuses always come out. The truth is that the one thing people really hate is the Sunnah of Rasoolullah. Alhamdulillah, Allah has given me such love for this Sunnah that I have stuck to it no matter what. The other tack they try, is to point out how bad Muslims are today, how they are fraudsters, womanisers and generally the biggest gangsters. "What do you want to follow them for", they say, "can't you see that they are the worst people?" I explain that it is a mistake to confuse the people with the religion, and that they should look to practising Muslims for examples of Islam.

    At the end of the day, however, I have no feelings of pride for anything that I have done. I mean look at the Sahaaba. That is what you call sacrifice. These people died for the sake of establishing the deen, and they were tortured and mutilated for following Islam. The sort of sacrifice that I have made is truly nothing in comparison. Those people used to sacrifice everything, and look at us today. We can't sacrifice T.V., we can't sacrifice music, and all this is peanuts compared with what they went through. Their love for Rasoolullah was so great that they never would question his guidance in any matter. Nowadays we have all our books, all our kitaabs, but they had none of this. They would see it and practise it. I always remember the Hadith about the Sahaaba who was returning to Madinah one evening after a day's work. He met another Sahaaba coming the other way, and enquired of him, "What have you learned from Rasoolullah today?" The man replied, "Rasoolullah said today that those people whose clothes hang lower than their ankles will burn in hellfire." The first Sahaaba, without a moment's delay, put down what he was carrying and tore his garment to the appropriate length. When his companion asked why he had not waited until returning home so that the job could be done neatly and nicely, he replied, "If I die on the way home, how then could I face Allah?" They had such Imaan and such sincerity, we can barely imagine it today.

    An example of how we are today came up recently where I work. A non-Muslim lad called Tony works with us at the leather factory, and part of his job is to chase the debts owed to the firm. He came back from one such mission recently, and the client that he had visited was a Muslim, as are ninety-nine percent of those in the leather industry. "So is he going to pay us?" asked my boss. "No he's not", said Tony. "How come?" the boss said. "What did he say?" "All he said was that 'Insha'Allah' he would pay", said Tony, " and I know from experience that what that means is he definitely won't pay." My boss tried to explain to him that actually, 'Insha'Allah' means that you hope and intend that you will do something. "Anyway", he said," at least he mentioned the name of Allah. That is a good thing to do in any case." "I disagree", said Tony, and I thought his comment here was spot-on. "How can it be good that he mentions Allah's name, when what he is doing is making a joke of Allah's name and making a mockery of Allah's name". That is how we are today, I'm afraid. We say things like, "Oh Insha'Allah I will start to pray Salaah, if Allah gives me the tawfeeq I will do it". If someone puts a glass of water in front of you, you don't say, "Oh make du'a that I drink this water, Insha'Allah I will drink it if I get the tawfeeq". No, you just pick it up and drink it. Mentioning Allah in this way is nothing short of hypocrisy.

    I know what I was before, and I know what I am today, and I certainly don't hold myself up as a good example of Islam, but I ask that whoever reads this should sincerely ask Allah that, Insha'Allah, me and you can practise Islam properly in our lives and try to become better people.

    Ameen.



    #2
    Beautiful!

    Comment


      #3
      Are u sure you did not convert at gun point like 1.2B muslims did

      Comment


        #4
        First he was not happy the way Hindus live, then the way sikhs live then the way Christians live and now, now after taking shahada he is not happy with the way most muslims live and he want to go back to keeping his ankles bare and riding camels. heck he could have done that being an Hindu too no one would ahve cared. What a spiritually confused! Another Johny walker in the making.

        Comment


          #5
          You are kind of right. If all you care about is keeping your ankles bare and riding Camels, you could be a Dhoti-Wearing Hindu settled in Rajasthan
          However his journey seems to be more complicated than that.
          Anyway I wish him all the best and warn him if he tries to convert into some other religion, the responses he will get on this forum won't be so friendly

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Shehzaada:
            heart warming story of a bro who converted to Islam.....

            My parents are Hindus from the Punjab, and though I was brought up with the basic Hindu beliefs, I went to a Christian, Church of England school from Primary school age. So even though I knew the whole of Hinduism, I could never accept or understand all the idolatry to do with the monkeys and elephants and so on, so my underlying belief was really in Christianity. I always considered myself a Christian, though I never got baptised. My parents had strong links with the Sikh community, and since there are not many centres for the Punjabi Hindu community in Bolton where they live, we always used to go to the Sikh temples (the Gurduwaras) where we used to participate in their functions, though I can't say I ever had any positive spiritual feeling from these events.

            Basically, I have since childhood always been interested in religion, always believing that there was one God, and this was certainly partly from my parents, who also were religious within their own tradition.

            Having said that, however, they are directed mainly towards Sikhism nowadays, and today they follow a Guru, and are more or less completely within the scope of that religion .

            I didn't start questioning my belief in Christianity until I went to secondary school and started meeting Muslims, where more or less all my friends were Muslims. After school they were always going to the mosque, and they would have their Qur'ans with them, and they fasted in the month of Ramadhan - I remember having fun getting all their dinner tickets off them, and all this had an effect somewhere in the back of my mind. I could see that they were doing all these things with sincerity, so I realised that there was something behind this. I would just observe all these things and you sort of file things away in the back of your mind.

            One time when I was about thirteen years old I went to visit a friend of mine. He wasn't at home, but his older brother was there and he invited me in. We sat down and he asked me about my background and beliefs. When I finished my answer, he questioned me about my Christian beliefs, and made out the case for Islam, especially concerning the scientific accuracy of the Qur'an. Generally he gave a very inspiring explanation to me about the Deen, and looking back, the insight I gained from him that day was such that I could say that the belief entered my heart from then, for I left with the conviction that Islam was the true religion. I was buzzing until I got home, but then the momentum of my daily routines somehow put any further action onto the back-burner, and it wasn't until I got to college that I made any further progress.

            My friends there were also all Muslims, and I spent all my time with them and enjoyed their company, and they even used to say to me "One day you'll become Muslim". I never thought much about such comments, until a conversation with one particular friend who asked me outright - "Why don't you become Muslim?" For some reason I took it seriously this time, and decided to get hold of a Qur'an to find out what exactly was the message of Islam. So I started reading the Qur'an, and the more I read, the more I became convinced that this was really the word of God, and that it had to be the truth. Of course I didn't tell my parents at this stage, and I was careful to keep my belief a secret from them.

            Eventually they told me I would have to stop loafing around and make a contribution to the family business and help in the warehouse. I started running a warehouse on Bury New Road and it was from there that I made further enquiries through a friend, and got some books so that I could learn how to pray Salaah. Alhamdulillah, he started teaching me, and he got me books on Aqidah as well. I had these books hidden in my room at home, and I would wait until everyone was asleep and then would put on the light and start to read. I had so much love and appetite for this learning that I would stay awake like this every night to discover more and more about the deen. One night my father happened to go to the bathroom when it was very late, and he noticed that my light was on. He came into the room and caught me in my studies. Straight away he realised what it was all about, but he didn't make a big scene that night, deciding instead to leave it until the morning.

            The next morning broke like a storm, with aggressive questioning as both my parents flipped. They realised from my routines, which had seemed strange to them, that I was a practising Muslim. I used to come from work, go straight to the bathroom and then into my room for an hour or so - I prayed my Salaah all together at that time, not knowing any better. Big debates raged, as they told me I couldn't become a Muslim, that it was no good for the family etc. They tried bribing me, offering me a house, a wife , cars - anything to get me to leave Islam. But once that love for Islam comes into your heart, nothing can buy it, so I didn't accept any of their pleas.

            My parents were due to go to India at the time, and they said that they wouldn't go unless I renounced Islam. Now the month of Ramadhan was imminent, and I knew that if they were still around, they wouldn't let me do a single fast. So I decided to fob them off, and told them that I would leave Islam, just to get them out of the country. Once they had gone I was able to practise more easily, but when they found out that I was fasting, they told my aunts and uncles to throw me out of the house. They couldn't bring themselves to do it, though, and told me to wait until my parents returned. When they did come back, the debates and threats began again, until eventually they realised that I wasn't going to change. So they told me that I would have to leave home. They did it in a nice way, saying that I could take whatever I wanted from the house, and they gave me some money, but the bottom line was "Just go." The memory still hurts. Leaving home like that is not a normal thing, and it's not an easy thing to do. You leave your family, you leave your sisters, your brothers - it's not easy. Your parents, who have brought you up and cared for you throughout your whole life, who have never treated you badly, never done anything wrong to you, suddenly turn round and ask you to leave home. So I did. I left. I didn't want to leave, but I thought "Look, this is what I have to do for Islam", and I left. They said to me that they didn't want to see me or even to hear a word from me, and that I should go at least two hundred miles away to live.

            So I came to London with just my bag. I had a close friend from school living somewhere in Clapton, and I set about finding him. I searched at the mosque near where I thought he lived, and I explained my situation to the people that I found there. Not one of them offered to help me. Everyone passed me on, saying "Oh, go to the maulvi", then he said "Go to such and such a person", who in turn sent me elsewhere, basically, no-one wanted to know. Eventually, after wandering the streets for a few hours, I went to the police station and asked for help, saying I was homeless and had nowhere to go. Their 'help' was to direct me to the bus-stop outside. I could sleep there, they said. Anyway, I went back to the mosque to pray my Salaah, and a nephew of my friend was there who noticed me and took me back to their house to wait for my friend, who was at work at the time. Shukr wal hamdulillah, they took me in, and I stayed there 8 weeks until I sorted somewhere out for myself.

            Alhamdulillah, after the initial cut-off I gradually re-established some form of link with my family, and now I even have some quite good talks sometimes with my father about matters to do with Islam and so on. Nowadays they say to me, "You can live with us again if you want, and come back to the house - but become a normal Muslim." I say "What is a 'normal' Muslim to you?" "You know, like the ones we have got around here, clean-shaven, disco-going types. You can do all your practise in the house, why do you have to show everyone your Islam?" I tell them, "This is a normal Muslim, I don't know of any other sort of Muslim. Your Guru, whose picture you keep on your wall, he wears a turban, so why can't I wear one?" "Oh, people will laugh", they say. These sort of excuses always come out. The truth is that the one thing people really hate is the Sunnah of Rasoolullah. Alhamdulillah, Allah has given me such love for this Sunnah that I have stuck to it no matter what. The other tack they try, is to point out how bad Muslims are today, how they are fraudsters, womanisers and generally the biggest gangsters. "What do you want to follow them for", they say, "can't you see that they are the worst people?" I explain that it is a mistake to confuse the people with the religion, and that they should look to practising Muslims for examples of Islam.

            At the end of the day, however, I have no feelings of pride for anything that I have done. I mean look at the Sahaaba. That is what you call sacrifice. These people died for the sake of establishing the deen, and they were tortured and mutilated for following Islam. The sort of sacrifice that I have made is truly nothing in comparison. Those people used to sacrifice everything, and look at us today. We can't sacrifice T.V., we can't sacrifice music, and all this is peanuts compared with what they went through. Their love for Rasoolullah was so great that they never would question his guidance in any matter. Nowadays we have all our books, all our kitaabs, but they had none of this. They would see it and practise it. I always remember the Hadith about the Sahaaba who was returning to Madinah one evening after a day's work. He met another Sahaaba coming the other way, and enquired of him, "What have you learned from Rasoolullah today?" The man replied, "Rasoolullah said today that those people whose clothes hang lower than their ankles will burn in hellfire." The first Sahaaba, without a moment's delay, put down what he was carrying and tore his garment to the appropriate length. When his companion asked why he had not waited until returning home so that the job could be done neatly and nicely, he replied, "If I die on the way home, how then could I face Allah?" They had such Imaan and such sincerity, we can barely imagine it today.

            An example of how we are today came up recently where I work. A non-Muslim lad called Tony works with us at the leather factory, and part of his job is to chase the debts owed to the firm. He came back from one such mission recently, and the client that he had visited was a Muslim, as are ninety-nine percent of those in the leather industry. "So is he going to pay us?" asked my boss. "No he's not", said Tony. "How come?" the boss said. "What did he say?" "All he said was that 'Insha'Allah' he would pay", said Tony, " and I know from experience that what that means is he definitely won't pay." My boss tried to explain to him that actually, 'Insha'Allah' means that you hope and intend that you will do something. "Anyway", he said," at least he mentioned the name of Allah. That is a good thing to do in any case." "I disagree", said Tony, and I thought his comment here was spot-on. "How can it be good that he mentions Allah's name, when what he is doing is making a joke of Allah's name and making a mockery of Allah's name". That is how we are today, I'm afraid. We say things like, "Oh Insha'Allah I will start to pray Salaah, if Allah gives me the tawfeeq I will do it". If someone puts a glass of water in front of you, you don't say, "Oh make du'a that I drink this water, Insha'Allah I will drink it if I get the tawfeeq". No, you just pick it up and drink it. Mentioning Allah in this way is nothing short of hypocrisy.

            I know what I was before, and I know what I am today, and I certainly don't hold myself up as a good example of Islam, but I ask that whoever reads this should sincerely ask Allah that, Insha'Allah, me and you can practise Islam properly in our lives and try to become better people.

            Ameen.

            there are still some more religions left in the world why don't you try the remaining of them
            good luck

            Comment


              #7
              my my..there's no pleasing the sour grapes is there?

              ------------------
              "Nothing Important Happened Today"

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Abdali:
                Are u sure you did not convert at gun point like 1.2B muslims did

                what!? explain plz

                ------------------
                What do you mean I am not kind...just not your kind.

                Comment


                  #9
                  there are many individual caes of conversion. george harrisoin wanted to flkoat his ashes in ganges and many in west joined hare rama.

                  muslims never tire of telling that there are lot of conversions in blacks in US. but how many??

                  at this rate what are chances of christians being minority in USA.

                  individual conveersions which take place either through thinking or influence of frienmd or spouse are very few.

                  whenever entire demographies have changed, as in first 65 years of islam entire arabia became muslim which happened along with military conquest.

                  according to abdali, 'muslims ruled ass of indians' and 'muslims ruled indians with chappals' (moderators have full permission to him to write in any languge he can, rather only language he can). if so, one could easily say that conversions were result of coersion. cowards will rather join people who are ruling with chappals than defend the faith.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    ASLAM MY BROTHER!
                    I JUST LIKE TO SAY U MADE A GOOD CHOICE, YOU WILL GET THE REWARD IN THE END FROM ALLAH(SWT). SO DON'T CARE WHAT ANYONE ELSE THINKS OF YOU.
                    I JUST HOPE THAT THERE ARE MORE MUSLIMS LIKE YOU IN THIS WORLD. WILLING TO SACRIFICE YOUR PARENTS FOR ISLAM. LIKE YOU SAID THEY TRIED SO HARD TO BRING ISLAM ABOUT, WE GET IT LAID ON A PLATE FOR US AND WE STILL DON'T ABIDE WITH IT.
                    THESE DAYS THEY R JUST MUSLIMS BY NAME.
                    INSHALLAH ONE DAY, THEY WILL SEE SENSE.
                    SO ALL I HAVE GOT TO SAY TO U IS I WISH YOU ALL THE BEST IN BECOMING A TRUE MUSLIM.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      ASLAM MY BROTHER!
                      I JUST LIKE TO SAY U MADE A GOOD CHOICE, YOU WILL GET THE REWARD IN THE END FROM ALLAH(SWT). SO DON'T CARE WHAT ANYONE ELSE THINKS OF YOU.
                      I JUST HOPE THAT THERE ARE MORE MUSLIMS LIKE YOU IN THIS WORLD. WILLING TO SACRIFICE YOUR PARENTS FOR ISLAM. LIKE YOU SAID THEY TRIED SO HARD TO BRING ISLAM ABOUT, WE GET IT LAID ON A PLATE FOR US AND WE STILL DON'T ABIDE WITH IT.
                      THESE DAYS THEY R JUST MUSLIMS BY NAME.
                      INSHALLAH ONE DAY, THEY WILL SEE SENSE.
                      SO ALL I HAVE GOT TO SAY TO U IS I WISH YOU ALL THE BEST IN BECOMING A TRUE MUSLIM.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        edited.

                        [This message has been edited by Sentinel (edited December 06, 2001).]

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I don't see more posts from Shehzada. Like did he confront any practicinfg Muslim with this hypocruicy? Did he go to Muslim houses (Now that he is one of them) and observe their way of life? Their opinions and politics? etc., etc.,

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Do not resort to abusive language

                            [This message has been edited by Sentinel (edited December 06, 2001).]

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by kumarakn:
                              Another Confused loser!
                              GO AND GET A LIFE! YOU ARE JUST JEALOUS.

                              Comment

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