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    Grave Worshipping

    About a year ago when I was in Pakistan, my cousins took me to this ziarat (i think thats what they call it) it was sooo weird they're like praying too the dead saint, there was music and all sorts of unislamic stuff going on I told them it was shirk and my cousins started calling me a wahabi n stuff.
    does worshipping graves of dead sufi saints (which are full of worms and stinking flesh ) have any basis in Koran or Hadith?

    if its really part of Islam then where just as bad as idol worshippers


    [This message has been edited by Shehzaada (edited August 30, 2001).]

    #2
    I don't think they are worshipping the graves. They are paying their respects to the dead Sufi saints.

    Comment


      #3
      Grave Worshipping is SHIRK/HARAM !!!!!

      Salman:

      Grave-worship, the belief that dead awliyaa’ (“saints”) can fulfil one’s needs or help at times of distress, and calling upon them for aid. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

      “And your Lord has decreed that you worship none but Him . . .” [al-Israa’ 17:23]

      Similarly, they call upon dead Prophets, righteous people and others to intercede for them or to rescue them from some calamity, but Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

      “Is not He (better than your gods) Who responds to the distressed one, when he calls Him, and Who removes the evil, and makes you inheritors of the earth, generations after generations? Is there any ilaah (god) with Allaah? . . .” [al-Naml 27:62]

      Some of them have adopted the habit of mentioning the name of a shaykh or wali (“saint”) when they stand up, or sit down, or stumble, or encounter problems or distress, so they might say “O Muhammad!” or “O ‘Ali!” or “O Husayn!” or “O Badawi!” or “O Jeelaani!” or “O Shaadhili!” or “O Rifaa’i!” - or they may call upon al-’Aydaroos or Sayyidah Zaynab or Ibn ‘Alwaan. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

      “Verily those whom you call upon besides Allaah are slaves like you . . .” [al-A’raf 7:194]

      Some of those who worship graves walk around them as if in Tawaaf, and acknowledge their corners, or touch them, kiss them, wipe their faces with their dust, prostrate towards them when they see them, or stand before them in fear and humility, praying for whatever they need of healing from some disease, or for a child, or for help with some difficulty. Sometimes they call upon the occupant of the grave, saying “O my master, I have come to you from far away, so do not let me down.” But Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

      “And who is more astray than one who calls (invokes) besides Allaah such as will not answer him till the Day of Resurrection, and who are (even) unaware of their calls (invocations) to them?” [al-Ahqaaf 46:5]

      The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Whoever dies calling on someone else as a rival to Allaah, will enter Hell.” (Reported by al-Bukhaari, al-Fath, 8/176).

      Some of them shave their heads at the graves, and some have books with titles like Manaasik Hajj al-Mashaahid (“The Rituals of Pilgrimage to Shrines”), mashaahid or shrines referring to graves or tombs of awliyaa’. Some of them believe that the awliyaa’ are running the affairs of the universe and that they have the power to benefit or harm. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

      “And if Allaah touches you with hurt, there is none who can remove it but He; and if He intends any good for you, there is no one who can repel His Favour . . .” [Yoonus 10:107]

      It is also shirk to make a vow to any other than Allaah, as is done by those who vow to bring candles or lights for the occupants of the graves.

      [This message has been edited by Sadiaa (edited August 30, 2001).]

      Comment


        #4
        If they are praying around the graves, it doesn't automatically mean they are worshipping the graves. They could be worshipping Allah, ever thought of that? I mean if I start reading namaz in my room and the computer is there, that does not mean I'm worshipping the computer.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Salman:
          If they are praying around the graves, it doesn't automatically mean they are worshipping the graves. They could be worshipping Allah, ever thought of that? I mean if I start reading namaz in my room and the computer is there, that does not mean I'm worshipping the computer.
          I don't think we're allowed to read namaz in graveyards. I'm not quite sure abt it, but i've definitely heard of it.

          Comment


            #6
            Source:http://www.islam-qa.com

            #7875

            "Praise be to Allaah.

            It is not permissible to pray in this mosque that is adjoining the grave, especially since the grave is in the qiblah faced by the worshippers, and between them there is a wall with windows in it that overlook the grave. It is still not permissible even if it does not occur to them to venerate the grave. It was reported that it is forbidden to pray in graveyards. ‘Umar saw a man praying at a grave and forbade him to do that, saying, ‘Don’t pray at the grave.’ (Narrated by al-Bayhaqi, 2/435; classified as mu’aalaq by al-Bukhaari in his Saheeh, 1/523; classified as mawsool by ‘Abd al-Razzaaq, 1/404, no. 1581). "

            #14285

            " Praise be to Allaah.

            With regard to reciting Qur’aan when visiting the grave, this is something which has no basis in the Sunnah.

            It is not prescribed in Islam, and the fact that it is not prescribed is supported by the hadeeth of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him): “Do not make your houses into graveyards, for the Shaytaan flees from a house in which Soorat al-Baqarah is recited.” This was narrated by Muslim and al-Tirmidhi from the hadeeth of Abu Hurayrah. This indicates that graves are not the place for reading Qur’aan, hence the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) encouraged reading Qur’aan in our houses and told us not to make them like graveyards where it is not read. Another hadeeth indicates that they (graveyards) are not the place for prayer (salaah) either. The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Pray in your houses and do not make them like graves.” This was narrated by Muslim and others from Ibn ‘Umar. A similar report was narrated by al-Bukhaari, who included it in a chapter entitled Baab Karaahat al-Salaah fi’l-Maqaabir (Chapter on it being disliked to pray in graveyards); thus he indicated that the hadeeth of Ibn ‘Umar could be understood to mean that it is makrooh to pray in graveyards. Similarly the hadeeth of Abu Hurayrah may be understood to mean that it is makrooh to read Qur’aan in graveyards. There is no difference between praying and reading Qur’aan in this regard. Abu Dawood said in his Masaa’il (p. 158): “I heard Ahmad being asked about reading Qur’aan at the graveside. He said, ‘No [that should not be done].’”

            It is not prescribed in Islam to put “aas” leaves (a kind of tree) or fragrant herbs or roses on the grave, because this is not what the salaf did, and if it was good, they would have done it before us. Ibn ‘Umar (may Allaah be pleased with them both) said: “Every bid’ah (innovation) is a going astray, even if the people think it is good.” (Narrated by Ibn Battah in al-Ibaanah ‘an Usool al-Diyaanah, 2/112; al-Laakaa’i in al-Sunnah, 1/21, a mawqoof report with a saheeh isnaad).

            We ask Allaah to bestow mercy upon the deceased Muslims. May Allaah bless our Prophet Muhammad. "


            [This message has been edited by Sadiaa (edited August 30, 2001).]

            Comment


              #7
              Zahid, Namaaz parhne de Kabristan main baith kar
              Ya vo jagah bata de jahaan Khuda na ho

              Zara Soocho!!!

              [This message has been edited by Tanhaa (edited August 30, 2001).]

              Comment


                #8
                But everyone across the Middle East goes to graves and they are praying there. In Syria, at the Ziarat of Bibi Zainab, the sister of Imam Husayn, they are countless people who pray there, and yes, kiss the site of the grave. I don't hear anyone shouting O Zainab though.
                In regards to the Quranic ayats, I think that Allah means calling on some other deity besides Him. I mean saying Ya Ali or Ya Hussain, does not mean you worship Ali or Hussain or are calling on them for help. In my opinion, they say that to associate their grievances with them. I mean when I was in Lebanon, I went to a funeral, and they kept saying Ya Usmaan, Ya Usmaan, and crying and wailing. The deceased name was Usmaan. I don't think they were worshipping the deceased or asking his help. They were simply displaying thier grief. An in Lebanon, when my friend called me to go to the park, he always said Ya Salman. And when somebody called my dad they said Ya Abu Salman.

                [This message has been edited by Salman (edited August 30, 2001).]

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Salman:
                  But everyone across the Middle East goes to graves and they are praying there. In Syria, at the Ziarat of Bibi Zainab, the sister of Imam Husayn, they are countless people who pray there, and yes, kiss the site of the grave. I don't hear anyone shouting O Zainab though.
                  I don't know abt tht. I posted what i believe in. Besides i'll be responsible for my own acts and not for the ppl in Middle East or anywhere else in the world.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Salman:
                    But everyone across the Middle East goes to graves and they are praying there. In Syria, at the Ziarat of Bibi Zainab, the sister of Imam Husayn, they are countless people who pray there, and yes, kiss the site of the grave. I don't hear anyone shouting O Zainab though.
                    Honor killings are also common in the Middle East...shall we make em even more popular within our community too?

                    Grave Worshipping is haram. IF you really are worshipping Allah in these ziaratgah's then why not go any MOSQUE and pray there? Why someplace with some person's decaying features?

                    By the way, these people are not there to worship Allah directly. They take these dead "sufis" to be the connection between them and the Creator. Nonsense.

                    It is Haram. Not that hard to understand.



                    [This message has been edited by X_Communist (edited August 30, 2001).]

                    Comment


                      #11
                      IMO, Ancestral rituals across the world have always been aimed at establishing an inspirational communication with ancestors to enable them to contribute to the direction of the nation, it's about respect and not forgetting who you are.

                      i see nothing wrong with it as long as it's taken in the proper context, though in any form it may be unislamic.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Saying Yal Ali or Ya Husain may not mean anything but What about saying " Ya Ali Madad", This clearly implies asking for help from someone who is not alive and is other than Allah.

                        I have seen it commonly in Pakistan that people do perform Sajda towards the graves of Saints(not towards Kaaba) and explicitly ask for help without any reference to Allah.
                        This practice is shared by ............

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I once read that all that is permissible at a grave is reciting Sura Fatiha - doing namaaz at a grave site is most definately and without a doubt not haraam.

                          It is unfortunate that these days anyone who speaks out against such bidah is immediately labelled a Wahabi whether they identify themselves as such or not.
                          Muslims are so good at dividing that they can divide the atom. If you see two Muslims, probably they belong to 3 parties.
                          Al-Ghazali

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