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Should we use word "Allah" or "God"

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    Should we use word "Allah" or "God"

    In as many times as we have been on the internet or in a discussion or a chat group, we almost always run into someone who feels offended that we use the word "God" when we talk about the One and Only God (Allah in Arabic).

    It is surprising to notice that most of these Muslim brothers and/or sisters do not know that the word "Allah" is the Arabic word for the word "God". Many of them believe that "Allah" is the name of the Muslim God. They do not realize that the word "Allah" does not belong exclusively to the Muslims and that it has always been used before (and after) Islam by the Arabic-speaking Jews and Christians when they speak about God.

    Talking to English speaking people about God using the word "Allah" is very much the same like speaking to Arabic speaking people about "Allah" using the word God. It makes all the sense to show respect to the people and their language by speaking to them in the language they use.

    Insisting on the use of the word "Allah" which is the Arabic word for God immediately creates the illusion that "Allah" is a whole different deity than God of the whole world. It creates a god that belongs ONLY to the Muslims, and takes the universality of Islam out of it.

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    [This message has been edited by amy (edited June 07, 2001).]

    #2
    I've always found the situation to be reversed. All of my Christian friends have difficulty in accepting Allah as meaning God, and not merely being the name of the god which Muslims worship.

    For example, my best friend at school, who was an Orthodox Christian, only realised that Muslims and Christians worship the same god when I posed to him the question:

    "What word do Arab Christians say when they refer to God?"

    The answer is, of course, Allah.
    Muslims are so good at dividing that they can divide the atom. If you see two Muslims, probably they belong to 3 parties.
    Al-Ghazali

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      #3

      I've had a few Chrostian friends who had difficulty in understanding the difference between "Allah" and "God" (i.e. none).

      I just tell them that we both believe in the same creator of the universe. That seems to get the message across.

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        #4
        amy,
        Allah is arabic word and God is english or "khudha"in urdu. the meaning are same.

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        "Away from Eyes......Close to Heart"

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          #5
          Originally posted by Insaaniat:
          amy,
          Allah is arabic word and God is english or "khudha"in urdu. the meaning are same.
          Actually, "Khuda" is Persian....we just pinched it off them!

          Muslims are so good at dividing that they can divide the atom. If you see two Muslims, probably they belong to 3 parties.
          Al-Ghazali

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            #6
            Originally posted by mAd_ScIeNtIsT:
            Actually, "Khuda" is Persian....we just pinched it off them!
            True but we did not pinched it off them. Khuda is part of the language that mostly comprises Urdu lughat.

            Khuda Hafiz

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              #7
              Another issue is that of Khuda Hafiz and Allah Hafiz. Khuda Hafiz, which is taken from Persian, is opposed by some of the people I know who say: "Khuda to koi bhi ho sakta hai, Hamara to aik hi Khuda hai jo Allah hai. Khuda Hafiz mat kaha karo...Allah Hafiz kaha karo!"

              I think it contains the following error: "Type Mismatch" (Allah in Arabic, Hafiz in Persian)

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              Get Back to Where you Once Belonged!

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                #8
                Originally posted by Beatle_ki_wapsi:
                Another issue is that of Khuda Hafiz and Allah Hafiz. Khuda Hafiz, which is taken from Persian, is opposed by some of the people I know who say: "Khuda to koi bhi ho sakta hai, Hamara to aik hi Khuda hai jo Allah hai. Khuda Hafiz mat kaha karo...Allah Hafiz kaha karo!"

                I think it contains the following error: "Type Mismatch" (Allah in Arabic, Hafiz in Persian)
                IMO:

                For the most part those who say Allah Hafiz are wahabis. I refuse to say Allah Hafiz since this is not standard departing greeting and I don't see anything wrong with is part of our culture. From a proper religious point of view Ma'as salaama? would be correct? But the thought on this is that this is arabic and you are not arabic. ?

                The creator can be called by any name that reminds, or makes, you of Him only: Allah, Rab, Khuda, God, Bhagwaan.

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                  #9
                  >>>Rab, Khuda, God, Bhagwaan<<<

                  Personally, whenever possible I try to avoid using anything other than 'Allah'. I have heard on more than one occasion that its not good to say Khuda, not because its not an arabic word, but because it is of persian origin; where it originally, before the coming of Islam had to do with a lot of 'gods' with 'dubious characteristics' shall we say. Likewise with Rab, Baghwan, though they also mean God, they are also associated with other kufr religions.

                  In my opinion, its better to stick with Allah which is pure.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by Girl from Quraysh:
                    >>>Rab, Khuda, God, Bhagwaan<<<

                    Personally, whenever possible I try to avoid using anything other than 'Allah'. I have heard on more than one occasion that its not good to say Khuda, not because its not an arabic word, but because it is of persian origin; where it originally, before the coming of Islam had to do with a lot of 'gods' with 'dubious characteristics' shall we say. Likewise with Rab, Baghwan, though they also mean God, they are also associated with other kufr religions.

                    In my opinion, its better to stick with Allah which is pure.
                    God was in existance before Islam. Not only is he God of muslims but he is God of the whole humanity which includes persians and hindus and every one else on earth. I wonder what animals call him ?



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                    Punjabi Kurhi

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                      #11
                      Amy,

                      I believe your original query was in regards to whether one should use Allah or God. For Muslims its preferrable to use the name Allah. That does not mean the other names are unacceptable, indeed, in some cases it may be better to use names other than Allah when you feel you may not be understood, or to ensure that you convey what it is you want to say accurately.

                      But if you have a choice, between using the name God and Allah, I would much rather use the latter.

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                        #12

                        Allah is the REAL name for our Lord and God is just the English translation.

                        If you look at previous scriptures and languages, the word Allah was used for our Creator.

                        There are 99 times mentioned in the Qur'aan.

                        Allah is by far superior and actually ordained rather than God.

                        Allah is our Creator.

                        Surely if God was a substitute, than the Qur'aan would of been revealed in the English language.

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by sholay:


                          Allah is by far superior and actually ordained rather than God.

                          ============================================

                          I would disagree with this statement. it gives the impression that Allah is a different entity than God which is not true. Allah and God are two names of same entity. There is just one God in Islamic, christian and jewish teachings whatever name you may use to describe it.

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                            #14
                            I also read somewhere that Allah was the name of one of the many gods of pre-islamic Arabs and Mohammad(like other ppl of his tribe) was worshiper of Allah before the concept of One God occured to him or you can say "Allah" started communicating with him.

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by Najoomi:

                              I also read somewhere that Allah was the name of one of the many gods of pre-islamic Arabs and Mohammad(like other ppl of his tribe) was worshiper of Allah before the concept of One God occured to him or you can say "Allah" started communicating with him.
                              Before the advent of Islam, there was a small group of people, who called themselves the followers of "Deen-e-Haneef", which was basically a monotheistic creed, ascribing to the belief of "one God" and adhering to the monotheistic practices of the Abrahamic tradition (these practices included: Sala'h (prayer), Sawm (fasting), Hajj (pilgrimage), Tawaaf (circumambulation of the Ka`bah), Ai`tikaaf (confinement to the mosque for concentrated worship) etc.). The Prophet (pbuh), it is generally believed, ascribed to this group. However, there is hardly any authentic information available on this topic in the books of history. Nevertheless, it should be remembered that the Qur’an has clearly stated that before the initiation of revelation, the Prophet (pbuh) was not fully aware of the details of faith and belief and neither of the divine laws (Al-Shooraa 42: 52).

                              In principle, the Prophet (pbuh), even before he received guidance from God, was an adherent of monotheism and of worship of one God only. Nevertheless, as far as the details of God’s guidance (beliefs as well as laws) are concerned, the Qur’an has adequately explained the Prophet’s condition as ‘one searching for the right path’, who was subsequently bestowed the divine guidance to the right path.

                              I hope this helps.

                              The Learner

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                              They shoot partypoopers, don't they?

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