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    questioning the Existence of GOD??

    Asslam-o-alaikum to all brothers n sisters!

    this is my first post as in topic or a subject n funnily it isn't from me
    it's just an e-mail i recieved n i was quite touched by it n i wanted to share it with u all. some or may be most of u might have heard or read it before. it's kinda long but well worth reading.

    Plz let me know ur opinions on it! shukriya!


    LET ME EXPLAIN THE problem science has with God" The
    > > atheist professor of philosophy pauses before his
    > > class and then asks one of his new students to stand.
    > >
    > > "You're a Muslim, aren't you, son?"
    > > "Yes, sir"
    > > "So you believe in God?"
    > > "Absolutely"
    > > "Is God good?"
    > > "Sure! God's good"
    > > "Is God all-powerful? Can God do anything?"
    > > "Yes"
    > >
    > > The professor grins knowingly and considers for a
    > > moment.
    > > "Here's one for you. Let's say there's a sick person
    > > over here and you can cure him. You can do it. Would
    > > you help them?
    > > "Would you try?"
    > > "Yes sir, I would"
    > > "So you're good...!"
    > > "I wouldn't say that"
    > > "Why not say that? You would help a sick and maimed
    > > person if you could ...in fact most of us would if we
    > > could... God doesn't.
    > > [No answer]
    > > "He doesn't, does he? My brother was a Muslim who died
    > > of cancer even though he prayed to God to heal him.
    > > How is this God good? Hmmm? Can you answer that one?"
    > > [No answer]
    > >
    > > The elderly man is sympathetic. "No, you can't, can
    > > you?" He takes a sip of water from a glass on his desk
    > > to give the student time to relax. In philosophy, you
    > > have to go easy with the new ones.
    > > "Let's start again, young fella."
    > > "Is God good?"
    > > "Er... Yes"
    > > "Is Satan good?"
    > > "No"
    > > "Where does Satan come from?"
    > > The student falters. "From... God..."
    > > "That's right. God made Satan, didn't he?"
    > > The elderly man runs his bony fingers through his
    > > thinning hair and turns to the smirking student
    > > audience. "I think we're going to have a lot of fun
    > > this semester, ladies and gentlemen. He turns back to
    > > the Muslim.
    > > "Tell me, son. Is there evil in this world?"
    > > "Yes, sir."
    > > "Evil's everywhere, isn't it? Did God make
    > > everything?"
    > > "Yes."
    > > "Who created evil?
    > > [No answer]
    > > "Is there sickness in this world? Immorality? Hatred?
    > > Ugliness? All the terrible things - do they exist in
    > > this world?"
    > > The student squirms on his feet. "Yes."
    > > "Who created them? "
    > > [No answer]
    > >
    > > The professor suddenly shouts at his student. "WHO
    > > CREATED THEM? TELL ME, PLEASE!" The professor closes
    > > in for the kill and climbs into the Muslim's face. In
    > > a still small voice:
    > > "God created all evil, didn't He, son?"
    > > [No answer] The student tries to hold the steady,
    > > experienced gaze and fails. Suddenly the lecturer
    > > breaks away to pace the front of the classroom like an
    > > ageing panther. The class is mesmerised.
    > > "Tell me," he continues, "How is it that this God is
    > > good if He created all evil throughout all time?" The
    > > professor swishes his arms around to encompass the
    > > wickedness of the world.
    > > "All the hatred, the brutality, all the pain, all the
    > > torture, all the death and ugliness and all the
    > > suffering created by this good God is all over the
    > > world, isn't it, young man?"
    > > [No answer]
    > >
    > > "Don't you see it all over the place? Huh?" Pause
    > > "Don't you?" The professor leans into the student's
    > > face again and whispers:
    > > "Is God good?"
    > > [No answer]
    > > "Do you believe in God, son?"
    > > The student's voice betrays him and cracks. "Yes,
    > > professor. I do."
    > > The old man shakes his head sadly. "Science says you
    > > have five senses you use to identify and observe the
    > > world around you.
    > > "You have never seen God, Have you? "
    > > "No, sir. I've never seen Him."
    > > "Then tell us if you've ever heard your God?"
    > > "No, sir. I have not."
    > > "Have you ever felt your God, tasted your God or smelt
    > > your God...in fact, do you have any sensory perception
    > > of your God whatsoever?"
    > > [No answer]
    > >
    > > "Answer me, please."
    > > "No, sir, I'm afraid I haven't."
    > > "You're AFRAID... you haven't?"
    > > "No, sir."
    > > "Yet you still believe in him?"
    > > "...yes..."
    > >
    > > "That takes FAITH!" The professor smiles sagely at the
    > > underling. "According to the rules of empirical,
    > > testable, demonstrable protocol, science says your God
    > > doesn't exist. What do you say to that, son? Where is
    > > your God now?"
    > > [The student doesn't answer]
    > > "Sit down, please."
    > > The Muslim sits...Defeated.
    > >
    > > Another Muslim raises his hand.
    > > "Professor, may I address the class?"
    > > The professor turns and smiles. "Ah, another Muslim in
    > > the vanguard! Come, come, young man. Speak some proper
    > > wisdom to the gathering." The Muslim looks around the
    > > room.
    > > "Some interesting points you are making, sir. Now I've
    > > got a question for you.
    > > "Is there such thing as heat?"
    > > "Yes," the professor replies. "There's heat."
    > > "Is there such a thing as cold?"
    > > "Yes, son, there's cold too."
    > >
    > > "No, sir, there isn't." The professor's grin freezes.
    > > The room suddenly goes very cold. The second Muslim
    > > continues. "You can have lots of heat, even more heat,
    > > super-heat, mega-heat, white heat, a little heat or no
    > > heat but we don't have anything called 'cold'. We can
    > > hit 458 degrees below zero, which is no heat, but we
    > > can't go any further after that. There is no such
    > > thing as cold, otherwise we would be able to go colder
    > > than 458.
    > >
    > > You see, sir, cold is only a word we use to describe
    > > the absence of heat. We cannot measure cold. Heat we
    > > can measure in thermal units because heat is energy.
    > > Cold is not the opposite of heat, sir, just the
    > > absence of it."
    > > Silence. A pin drops somewhere in the classroom.
    > > "Is there such a thing as darkness, professor?"
    > > "That's a dumb question, son. What is night if it
    > > isn't darkness? What are you getting at...?"
    > > "So you say there is such a thing as darkness?"
    > > "Yes..."
    > >
    > > "You're wrong again, sir. Darkness is not something,
    > > it is the absence of something. You can have low
    > > light, normal light, bright light, flashing light but
    > > if you have no light constantly you have nothing and
    > > it's called darkness, isn't it? That's the meaning we
    > > use to define the word. In reality, Darkness isn't. If
    > > it were, you would be able to make darkness darker and
    > > give me a jar of it Can you...give me a jar of darker
    > > darkness, professor?"
    > >
    > > Despite himself, the professor smiles at the young
    > > effrontery before him. This will indeed be a good
    > > semester. "Would you mind telling us what your point
    > > is, young man?"
    > > "Yes, professor. My point is, your philosophical
    > > premise is flawed to start with and so your conclusion
    > > must be in error...."
    > > The professor goes toxic. "Flawed...? How dare
    > > you...!"
    > > "Sir, may I explain what I mean?" The class is all
    > > ears.
    > >
    > > "Explain... oh, explain..." The professor makes an
    > > admirable effort to regain control. Suddenly he is
    > > affability itself. He waves his hand to silence the
    > > class, for the student to continue.
    > >
    > > "You are working on the premise of duality," the
    > > Muslim explains. "That for example there is life and
    > > then there's death; a good God and a bad God. You are
    > > viewing the concept of God as something finite,
    > > something we can measure. Sir, science cannot even
    > > explain a thought. It uses electricity and magnetism
    > > but has never seen, much less fully understood them.
    > >
    > > To view death as the opposite of life is to be
    > > ignorant of the fact that death cannot exist as a
    > > substantive thing. Death is not the opposite of life,
    > > merely the absence of it." The young man holds up a
    > > newspaper he takes from the desk of a neighbour who
    > > has been reading it.
    > > "Here is one of the most disgusting tabloids this
    > > country hosts, professor. Is there such a thing as
    > > immorality?"
    > > "Of course there is, now look..."
    > > "Wrong again, sir. You see, immorality is merely the
    > > absence of morality. Is there such thing as injustice?
    > > No. Injustice is the absence of justice. Is there such
    > > a thing as evil?" The Muslim pauses.
    > >
    > > "Isn't evil the absence of good?"
    > > The professor's face has turned an alarming colour. He
    > > is so angry he is temporarily speechless.
    > > The Muslim continues. "If there is evil in the world,
    > > professor, and we all agree there is, then God, if he
    > > exists, must be accomplishing a work through the
    > > agency of evil. What is that work, God is
    > > accomplishing? Islam tells us it is to see if each one
    > > of us will, choose good over evil."
    > >
    > > The professor bridles. "As a philosophical scientist,
    > > I don't vie this matter as having anything to do with
    > > any choice; as a realist, I absolutely do not
    > > recognise the concept of God or any other theological
    > > factor as being part of the world equation because God
    > > is not observable." "I would have thought that the
    > > absence of God's moral code in this world is probably
    > > one of the most observable phenomena going,"
    > >
    > > The Muslim replies. "Newspapers make billions of
    > > dollars reporting it every week! Tell me, professor.
    > > Do you teach your students that they evolved from a
    > > monkey?"
    > > "If you are referring to the natural evolutionary
    > > process, young man, yes, of course I do."
    > > "Have you ever observed evolution with your own eyes,
    > > sir?" The professor makes a sucking sound with his
    > > teeth and gives his student a silent, stony stare.
    > > "Professor. Since no-one has ever observed the process
    > > of evolution at work and cannot even prove that this
    > > process is an on-going endeavour, are you not teaching
    > > your opinion, sir? Are you now not a scientist, but a
    > > priest?"
    > >
    > > "I will overlook your impudence in the light of our
    > > philosophical discussion. Now, have you quite
    > > finished?" The professor hisses. "So you don't accept
    > > God's moral code to do what is righteous?" "I believe
    > > in what is - that's science!"
    > > "Ahh! SCIENCE!" the student's face splits into a grin.
    > > Sir, you rightly state that science is the study of
    > > observed phenomena. Science too is a premise which is
    > > flawed..."
    > > "SCIENCE IS FLAWED..?" the professor splutters. The
    > > class is in uproar. The Muslim remains standing until
    > > the commotion has subsided.
    > > "To continue the point you were making earlier to the
    > > other student, may I give you an example of what I
    > > mean?"
    > > The professor wisely keeps silent. The Muslim looks
    > > around the room.
    > >
    > > "Is there any one in the class who has ever seen air,
    > > Oxygen, molecules, atoms, the professor's brain?" The
    > > class breaks out in laughter. The Muslim points
    > > towards his elderly, crumbling tutor. "Is there anyone
    > > here who has ever heard the professor's brain... felt
    > > the professor's brain, touched or smelt the
    > > professor's brain?"
    > > No one appears to have done so. The Muslim shakes his
    > > head sadly.
    > >
    > > "It appears no-one here has had any sensory perception
    > > of the professor's brain whatsoever. Well, according
    > > to the rules of empirical, stable, demonstrable
    > > protocol, science, I DECLARE that the professor has no
    > > brain." Now it is everyone's chance to learn more
    > > about Islam, about God, about the purpose of
    > > existence, creation & life, about the prophets of god,
    > > & about his holy books, especially the holy qur'aan,
    > > then it is your choice to become a Muslim, or not.
    > >
    > > Allaah says in the holy Qur'aan: "there is no
    > > compulsion in religion; truly the right way has become
    > > clearly distinct from error; And he who rejects false
    > > deities and believes in Allah (The God) has grasped a
    > > firm handhold which will never break. And Allah is
    > > ALL-Hearing, All-Knowing (256) Allah is the Protecting
    > > Guardian of those who believe. He brings them out of
    > > the darkness into the light; As for those who
    > > disbelieve, their guardians are false deities. They
    > > bring them out of light into
    > > darkness...(257)"AL-QUR'AAN (CHAPTER # 2, VERSES #
    > > 256-257)

    -----------------------------
    Khudi ko ker buland itna key her taqdeer say phelay Khuda bunday say khud poochay bata teri raza kya hai? "Alama Iqbal"

    #2
    How beautiful. as i was reading it i felt as i was in their class, and thank god for the second muslim (Thank Allah for the courage he gave him). if it werent for him i wouldnt have been able to sleep tonight after the professor refuting God and defeating the first muslim. it goes to show how knowledge is priceless.
    May Allah give us all the knowldge that the guy had so we can help nonmuslims into islam,
    and can succeed in debating against nonmuslims.

    Comment


      #3
      thanx sheba 4 ur reply! lol. true i felt the same n so tense wen the first muslim wasn't able to answer i was thinking he could have said this or that. well like u said may Allah give us all the knowledege to learn the beauty of islam!!


      hey! wats up wid the rest of the ppl thirty four visits n one reply!!!

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Bismah:


        hey! wats up wid the rest of the ppl thirty four visits n one reply!!!

        i guess cuz its too long. on the average I believe it takes 10 minutes to read it !. itna time he hota hai merey pass sari posts read karney ka

        anyways it was good Emails bhi theek hein .. leikin Bismah tum khud bhi to kuch likha karo..

        Comment


          #5
          very nice

          Comment


            #6
            good one..in philosophy teachers ka bus chalay to na janay din ko raat sabit kar dain mantaq ki rooh say..

            Comment


              #7
              Existence of Allah.

              Questions of the nature of God, and the existence of Hell, Paradise, or Angels, cause us some difficulty, because we cannot perceive them, one of the criteria listed above. Is it possible to prove there existence despite our non-perception of them? Let us start with the existence of God. As outlined earlier the existense of God can be proven by contemplating upon all known things, and deducing that they are all limited and dependant. The sum of all limited and dependant things is limited or finite and all finite things have a begining and end. All finite things must have been created, because from observing reality we know that finite things do not create themselves. All dependant things are not self-sustaining, they therefore require something to sustain them, they do not exist of their own accord. The sustainer we have identified, through rational proof, we have called God or Allah. This proof has come through examining all within our perception therefore meets our limit of perception criteria. The fact that God is infinite and selfsubsistent, and we cannot perceive Gods nature or description is not of concern in proving Gods existence. And to spend time trying to perceive what we cannot is counter productive and will not lead to 'peace of mind'.

              We have intellectually brought a convincing argument for the existence of God. We must also examine if this agrees with mans nature. Man has certain instincts and organic needs, the satisfaction of which he constantly strives for. The organic needs are for food and drink, without which man will die. Instincts can be categorised as three: Survival or self preservation, Procreation or sexual, and Religiousness. We can see clearly certain manifestations or trails in man reflecting his desire to satisfy these instincts. Thus man acquires goods and nice objects, likes to own property, wants a job and income, can be greedy, and may save for the future, in attempting to satisfy his instinct for survival. Similarly compassion, affection, love, marriage, and sexual tendencies are expressions of the procreational instinct in man. The desire to worship, sanctify, revere or approach something of greater power or influence are part of man's instinct of religiousness.

              In a highly material and secular world many would deny the instinct of religiousness in man. The facts disagree with this opinion. Even in the most avowed of atheist societies, such as former Communist Russia, where the creed of Communism denied the existence of a Creator, we found busts and statues of men prominently displayed in order to satisfy man's desire to look up to something greater than him. Man had gone from the worship of the Creator to the worship of men like Lenin or Marx. In the West the situation is no different with man often worshipping or revering politicians, influential businessmen, celebrities, Royalty, or even sports personalities. Such a situation of human worship is not ultimately satisfying as all men are equally limited and dependant and man cannot affect mans ultimate destiny. We see politicians and philosophers making mistakes, businessmen at times failing, and no sportsman could alter his destiny.

              If man is to satisfy his instinct for religion he should only revere that which has control over him, and to which he will ultimately return. To worship or sanctify the relationship with God means man has a particular focus in life, that of acknowledging his shortcomings, and seeking guidance for all matters in life from the only source with absolute knowledge and understanding. To worship only the Creator, the one with absolute knowledge and control can be the only truly satisfying form of worship, in full agreement with man's instinct for religion. Worship, or looking up to other men or material things like money is intellectually weak and doesn't satisfy our instincts.

              Whilst man may believe in the existence of God through use of his instinctive emotions, this can be unreliable and dangerous as emotions change and can add errors to one 's beliefs and actions. In history we see many examples of men going far astray in believing fantasies or superstitions, or attributing human qualities to God, talking of a son of God, God reincarnate etc. all of which is false and can lead easily to disbelief. For this reason it is obligatory for the Muslim lo believe in the existence of God not solely through instinctive emotion, but with we of the mind. The believer must be intellectually convinced of the existence of God or else emotions of belief could be adversely changed. Concepts which people are convinced of will not change unless a stronger intellectual argument is brought, so use of the mind is required for a lasting understanding and belief.

              "Behold! in the creation of the heavens and the earth, and the alternation of night and day, they are indeed signs for men of understanding" [ TMQ 3:190 ]

              The Qur'an includes hundreds of verses directing man to look and contemplate deeply upon the universe and creation, to look at its interrelationships, and attributes which guide one to belief in the Creator, through use of the mind and ration.

              Lo! In the creation of the heavens and the earth, and the difference of night and day, and the ships which run upon the sea with that which is of use to men, and the water which Allah sends down from the sky, thereby reviving the earth after its death, and dispersing all kinds of beasts therein, and (in) the ordinance of the winds, and the clouds obedient between heaven and earth: They are signs for people who have sense. " [ TMO 2:164 ]

              source khilafah.org

              Comment


                #8
                Thanks ScarfAce for posting that.

                Dear Bismah

                Those Philosphy professor have their ways to make people fall. Its not easy to catch their tactics. I bet this professor would have tears in his eyes if he try to pull such act. These professor make sure their experiment is on the one who is not fimiliar with philosphy. They all play with human psycology.
                I love talking with these people as they think they are messing my mind. I show them they have control of my mind and then i totlly shock them . I want to sure how you can do that. But not today. Some time later .

                Comment


                  #9
                  salaam
                  hey thanx all 4 ur replys!!
                  thanx scarface 4 sharing that!
                  n lol salman mein bhi likhoon ge wen i get time.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I am TOTALLY changed....
                    Thanks u alllllll

                    Comment


                      #11
                      No thankYOU for reading

                      Click below for the full article.
                      http://www.khilafah.org/phase1/syste.../faithand.html

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Bismah:
                        Asslam-o-alaikum to all brothers n sisters!

                        this is my first post as in topic or a subject n funnily it isn't from me
                        it's just an e-mail i recieved n i was quite touched by it n i wanted to share it with u all. some or may be most of u might have heard or read it before. it's kinda long but well worth reading.

                        Plz let me know ur opinions on it! shukriya!


                        LET ME EXPLAIN THE problem science has with God" The
                        > > atheist professor of philosophy pauses before his
                        > > class and then asks one of his new students to stand.
                        > >
                        > > "You're a Muslim, aren't you, son?"
                        > > "Yes, sir"
                        > > "So you believe in God?"
                        > > "Absolutely"
                        > > "Is God good?"
                        > > "Sure! God's good"
                        > > "Is God all-powerful? Can God do anything?"
                        > > "Yes"
                        > >
                        > > The professor grins knowingly and considers for a
                        > > moment.
                        > > "Here's one for you. Let's say there's a sick person
                        > > over here and you can cure him. You can do it. Would
                        > > you help them?
                        > > "Would you try?"
                        > > "Yes sir, I would"
                        > > "So you're good...!"
                        > > "I wouldn't say that"
                        > > "Why not say that? You would help a sick and maimed
                        > > person if you could ...in fact most of us would if we
                        > > could... God doesn't.
                        > > [No answer]
                        > > "He doesn't, does he? My brother was a Muslim who died
                        > > of cancer even though he prayed to God to heal him.
                        > > How is this God good? Hmmm? Can you answer that one?"
                        > > [No answer]
                        > >
                        > > The elderly man is sympathetic. "No, you can't, can
                        > > you?" He takes a sip of water from a glass on his desk
                        > > to give the student time to relax. In philosophy, you
                        > > have to go easy with the new ones.
                        > > "Let's start again, young fella."
                        > > "Is God good?"
                        > > "Er... Yes"
                        > > "Is Satan good?"
                        > > "No"
                        > > "Where does Satan come from?"
                        > > The student falters. "From... God..."
                        > > "That's right. God made Satan, didn't he?"
                        > > The elderly man runs his bony fingers through his
                        > > thinning hair and turns to the smirking student
                        > > audience. "I think we're going to have a lot of fun
                        > > this semester, ladies and gentlemen. He turns back to
                        > > the Muslim.
                        > > "Tell me, son. Is there evil in this world?"
                        > > "Yes, sir."
                        > > "Evil's everywhere, isn't it? Did God make
                        > > everything?"
                        > > "Yes."
                        > > "Who created evil?
                        > > [No answer]
                        > > "Is there sickness in this world? Immorality? Hatred?
                        > > Ugliness? All the terrible things - do they exist in
                        > > this world?"
                        > > The student squirms on his feet. "Yes."
                        > > "Who created them? "
                        > > [No answer]
                        > >
                        > > The professor suddenly shouts at his student. "WHO
                        > > CREATED THEM? TELL ME, PLEASE!" The professor closes
                        > > in for the kill and climbs into the Muslim's face. In
                        > > a still small voice:
                        > > "God created all evil, didn't He, son?"
                        > > [No answer] The student tries to hold the steady,
                        > > experienced gaze and fails. Suddenly the lecturer
                        > > breaks away to pace the front of the classroom like an
                        > > ageing panther. The class is mesmerised.
                        > > "Tell me," he continues, "How is it that this God is
                        > > good if He created all evil throughout all time?" The
                        > > professor swishes his arms around to encompass the
                        > > wickedness of the world.
                        > > "All the hatred, the brutality, all the pain, all the
                        > > torture, all the death and ugliness and all the
                        > > suffering created by this good God is all over the
                        > > world, isn't it, young man?"
                        > > [No answer]
                        > >
                        > > "Don't you see it all over the place? Huh?" Pause
                        > > "Don't you?" The professor leans into the student's
                        > > face again and whispers:
                        > > "Is God good?"
                        > > [No answer]
                        > > "Do you believe in God, son?"
                        > > The student's voice betrays him and cracks. "Yes,
                        > > professor. I do."
                        > > The old man shakes his head sadly. "Science says you
                        > > have five senses you use to identify and observe the
                        > > world around you.
                        > > "You have never seen God, Have you? "
                        > > "No, sir. I've never seen Him."
                        > > "Then tell us if you've ever heard your God?"
                        > > "No, sir. I have not."
                        > > "Have you ever felt your God, tasted your God or smelt
                        > > your God...in fact, do you have any sensory perception
                        > > of your God whatsoever?"
                        > > [No answer]
                        > >
                        > > "Answer me, please."
                        > > "No, sir, I'm afraid I haven't."
                        > > "You're AFRAID... you haven't?"
                        > > "No, sir."
                        > > "Yet you still believe in him?"
                        > > "...yes..."
                        > >
                        > > "That takes FAITH!" The professor smiles sagely at the
                        > > underling. "According to the rules of empirical,
                        > > testable, demonstrable protocol, science says your God
                        > > doesn't exist. What do you say to that, son? Where is
                        > > your God now?"
                        > > [The student doesn't answer]
                        > > "Sit down, please."
                        > > The Muslim sits...Defeated.
                        > >
                        > > Another Muslim raises his hand.
                        > > "Professor, may I address the class?"
                        > > The professor turns and smiles. "Ah, another Muslim in
                        > > the vanguard! Come, come, young man. Speak some proper
                        > > wisdom to the gathering." The Muslim looks around the
                        > > room.
                        > > "Some interesting points you are making, sir. Now I've
                        > > got a question for you.
                        > > "Is there such thing as heat?"
                        > > "Yes," the professor replies. "There's heat."
                        > > "Is there such a thing as cold?"
                        > > "Yes, son, there's cold too."
                        > >
                        > > "No, sir, there isn't." The professor's grin freezes.
                        > > The room suddenly goes very cold. The second Muslim
                        > > continues. "You can have lots of heat, even more heat,
                        > > super-heat, mega-heat, white heat, a little heat or no
                        > > heat but we don't have anything called 'cold'. We can
                        > > hit 458 degrees below zero, which is no heat, but we
                        > > can't go any further after that. There is no such
                        > > thing as cold, otherwise we would be able to go colder
                        > > than 458.
                        > >
                        > > You see, sir, cold is only a word we use to describe
                        > > the absence of heat. We cannot measure cold. Heat we
                        > > can measure in thermal units because heat is energy.
                        > > Cold is not the opposite of heat, sir, just the
                        > > absence of it."
                        > > Silence. A pin drops somewhere in the classroom.
                        > > "Is there such a thing as darkness, professor?"
                        > > "That's a dumb question, son. What is night if it
                        > > isn't darkness? What are you getting at...?"
                        > > "So you say there is such a thing as darkness?"
                        > > "Yes..."
                        > >
                        > > "You're wrong again, sir. Darkness is not something,
                        > > it is the absence of something. You can have low
                        > > light, normal light, bright light, flashing light but
                        > > if you have no light constantly you have nothing and
                        > > it's called darkness, isn't it? That's the meaning we
                        > > use to define the word. In reality, Darkness isn't. If
                        > > it were, you would be able to make darkness darker and
                        > > give me a jar of it Can you...give me a jar of darker
                        > > darkness, professor?"
                        > >
                        > > Despite himself, the professor smiles at the young
                        > > effrontery before him. This will indeed be a good
                        > > semester. "Would you mind telling us what your point
                        > > is, young man?"
                        > > "Yes, professor. My point is, your philosophical
                        > > premise is flawed to start with and so your conclusion
                        > > must be in error...."
                        > > The professor goes toxic. "Flawed...? How dare
                        > > you...!"
                        > > "Sir, may I explain what I mean?" The class is all
                        > > ears.
                        > >
                        > > "Explain... oh, explain..." The professor makes an
                        > > admirable effort to regain control. Suddenly he is
                        > > affability itself. He waves his hand to silence the
                        > > class, for the student to continue.
                        > >
                        > > "You are working on the premise of duality," the
                        > > Muslim explains. "That for example there is life and
                        > > then there's death; a good God and a bad God. You are
                        > > viewing the concept of God as something finite,
                        > > something we can measure. Sir, science cannot even
                        > > explain a thought. It uses electricity and magnetism
                        > > but has never seen, much less fully understood them.
                        > >
                        > > To view death as the opposite of life is to be
                        > > ignorant of the fact that death cannot exist as a
                        > > substantive thing. Death is not the opposite of life,
                        > > merely the absence of it." The young man holds up a
                        > > newspaper he takes from the desk of a neighbour who
                        > > has been reading it.
                        > > "Here is one of the most disgusting tabloids this
                        > > country hosts, professor. Is there such a thing as
                        > > immorality?"
                        > > "Of course there is, now look..."
                        > > "Wrong again, sir. You see, immorality is merely the
                        > > absence of morality. Is there such thing as injustice?
                        > > No. Injustice is the absence of justice. Is there such
                        > > a thing as evil?" The Muslim pauses.
                        > >
                        > > "Isn't evil the absence of good?"
                        > > The professor's face has turned an alarming colour. He
                        > > is so angry he is temporarily speechless.
                        > > The Muslim continues. "If there is evil in the world,
                        > > professor, and we all agree there is, then God, if he
                        > > exists, must be accomplishing a work through the
                        > > agency of evil. What is that work, God is
                        > > accomplishing? Islam tells us it is to see if each one
                        > > of us will, choose good over evil."
                        > >
                        > > The professor bridles. "As a philosophical scientist,
                        > > I don't vie this matter as having anything to do with
                        > > any choice; as a realist, I absolutely do not
                        > > recognise the concept of God or any other theological
                        > > factor as being part of the world equation because God
                        > > is not observable." "I would have thought that the
                        > > absence of God's moral code in this world is probably
                        > > one of the most observable phenomena going,"
                        > >
                        > > The Muslim replies. "Newspapers make billions of
                        > > dollars reporting it every week! Tell me, professor.
                        > > Do you teach your students that they evolved from a
                        > > monkey?"
                        > > "If you are referring to the natural evolutionary
                        > > process, young man, yes, of course I do."
                        > > "Have you ever observed evolution with your own eyes,
                        > > sir?" The professor makes a sucking sound with his
                        > > teeth and gives his student a silent, stony stare.
                        > > "Professor. Since no-one has ever observed the process
                        > > of evolution at work and cannot even prove that this
                        > > process is an on-going endeavour, are you not teaching
                        > > your opinion, sir? Are you now not a scientist, but a
                        > > priest?"
                        > >
                        > > "I will overlook your impudence in the light of our
                        > > philosophical discussion. Now, have you quite
                        > > finished?" The professor hisses. "So you don't accept
                        > > God's moral code to do what is righteous?" "I believe
                        > > in what is - that's science!"
                        > > "Ahh! SCIENCE!" the student's face splits into a grin.
                        > > Sir, you rightly state that science is the study of
                        > > observed phenomena. Science too is a premise which is
                        > > flawed..."
                        > > "SCIENCE IS FLAWED..?" the professor splutters. The
                        > > class is in uproar. The Muslim remains standing until
                        > > the commotion has subsided.
                        > > "To continue the point you were making earlier to the
                        > > other student, may I give you an example of what I
                        > > mean?"
                        > > The professor wisely keeps silent. The Muslim looks
                        > > around the room.
                        > >
                        > > "Is there any one in the class who has ever seen air,
                        > > Oxygen, molecules, atoms, the professor's brain?" The
                        > > class breaks out in laughter. The Muslim points
                        > > towards his elderly, crumbling tutor. "Is there anyone
                        > > here who has ever heard the professor's brain... felt
                        > > the professor's brain, touched or smelt the
                        > > professor's brain?"
                        > > No one appears to have done so. The Muslim shakes his
                        > > head sadly.
                        > >
                        > > "It appears no-one here has had any sensory perception
                        > > of the professor's brain whatsoever. Well, according
                        > > to the rules of empirical, stable, demonstrable
                        > > protocol, science, I DECLARE that the professor has no
                        > > brain." Now it is everyone's chance to learn more
                        > > about Islam, about God, about the purpose of
                        > > existence, creation & life, about the prophets of god,
                        > > & about his holy books, especially the holy qur'aan,
                        > > then it is your choice to become a Muslim, or not.
                        > >
                        > > Allaah says in the holy Qur'aan: "there is no
                        > > compulsion in religion; truly the right way has become
                        > > clearly distinct from error; And he who rejects false
                        > > deities and believes in Allah (The God) has grasped a
                        > > firm handhold which will never break. And Allah is
                        > > ALL-Hearing, All-Knowing (256) Allah is the Protecting
                        > > Guardian of those who believe. He brings them out of
                        > > the darkness into the light; As for those who
                        > > disbelieve, their guardians are false deities. They
                        > > bring them out of light into
                        > > darkness...(257)"AL-QUR'AAN (CHAPTER # 2, VERSES #
                        > > 256-257)


                        I really enjoyed reading this!


                        :hula: :hula: :hula: and more :hula:

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