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    Best scientist(s) ever...

    Vote here for -in your opinion- the best and most influential scientist in history. I'd be glad if you could give some reasons for that
    Why so serious ... ?

    #2
    Re: Best scientist(s) ever...

    E=mC2

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Best scientist(s) ever...

      Heizinberg.. i like the way God play dice.

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Best scientist(s) ever...

        my prediction on how the poll will turn out - a close run between einstein and newton. doesnt look like darwin would get much votes on this board. :-D

        my vote goes for newton, for his contribution to mechanics - formulating the three laws of motion, law of gravitation; astronomy - discovered planets, explained comets, predicted orbit times; and to mathematics - inventing calculus.

        he has no doubt been the most "influential" from the list upto this day. we live in a world that runs on newtonian mechanics. subtract newtonian contributions from our daily life and we will be back in the dark ages. E = mc*c, and the photoelectric effect are yet to make a big mark in our way of life.

        to quote newton himself, "if i have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants". newton himself is an enormous giant upon whose sturdy shoulders stands modern physicists like einstein to make their contributions.
        Simple ain't easy.

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Best scientist(s) ever...

          Newton baba ki jai.
          This man was comlete genious, he has his theories in almost every branch of physics.
          Tu bhi villain ban sakta tha, "BILLA" ban sakta tha.....

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Best scientist(s) ever...

            Originally posted by queer
            my prediction on how the poll will turn out - a close run between einstein and newton. doesnt look like darwin would get much votes on this board. :-D

            my vote goes for newton, for his contribution to mechanics - formulating the three laws of motion, law of gravitation; astronomy - discovered planets, explained comets, predicted orbit times; and to mathematics - inventing calculus.

            he has no doubt been the most "influential" from the list upto this day. we live in a world that runs on newtonian mechanics. subtract newtonian contributions from our daily life and we will be back in the dark ages. E = mc*c, and the photoelectric effect are yet to make a big mark in our way of life.

            to quote newton himself, "if i have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants". newton himself is an enormous giant upon whose sturdy shoulders stands modern physicists like einstein to make their contributions.
            Newtonian mechanics fails when it is used to explain the motion of sub atomic particles. He never predicted the dual nature. He could not explain the black body radiation which finally lead to the development of quantum mechanics.
            U can say that in his century he was a stalwart..

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Best scientist(s) ever...

              true vinesh, but how much influence do subatomic dynamics and quantum mechanics have on human life as we know today?
              Simple ain't easy.

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Best scientist(s) ever...

                everrrr?

                The list is too recent.
                I know that you believe that you understood what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
                - Robert McCloskey

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Best scientist(s) ever...

                  ^if you know anyone from before the Greek period, you can mention him under 'other'
                  Why so serious ... ?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Best scientist(s) ever...

                    I voted in here but it took me to that poll in cafe which is like 3 yrz old... somethings not right today
                    I raced @200kph, crashed & survived. If you havent seen God, your not driving fast enough.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Best scientist(s) ever...

                      ^well, that's a glitch, but ur vote has been casted
                      Why so serious ... ?

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: Best scientist(s) ever...

                        Thats why I like Hawlkings

                        It took beyond the limits of space and time. I experienced time travel, fewl familiar face and then I came back. Einstein is high school kid in front of him
                        Bazinggaaaa ....

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: Best scientist(s) ever...

                          ^i doubt it, so far Hawkings theories have had no solid proof nor any practical implications, whereas einstein's and newton's (restricted to earth) have been verified in various ways and have had major implications on other fields as well, e.g. economy, medicine, aeronautics, space travel etc etc
                          Why so serious ... ?

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: Best scientist(s) ever...

                            He is the best cuz I say so Einstien gaya tail leney

                            Stephen Hawking

                            Stephen William Hawking (born January 8, 1942) is one of the world's leading theoretical physicists. Hawking is Lucasian professor of mathematics at the University of Cambridge (a post once held by Isaac Newton), and a fellow of Gonville and Caius College. The fact that he holds this post while being almost completely incapacitated with severe Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis has made him a worldwide celebrity.

                            Hawking's principal fields of research are theoretical cosmology and quantum gravity. In 1971, he provided mathematical support for the big-bang theory of the origin of the universe; if the general theory of relativity was correct the universe must have a singularity, or starting point, in space-time. Hawking also suggested that following the big bang primordial, or mini black holes were formed. He showed that the surface area of a black hole can increase but never decrease, that there is a limit on the radiation emitted when black holes collide, and that a single black hole cannot break apart into two separate black holes. In 1974, he calculated that black holes thermally create and emit subatomic particles until they exhaust their energy and explode. Known as Hawking radiation, it linked gravity, quantum mechanics, and thermodynamics mathematically for the first time. In 1981, Hawking proposed that although the universe has no boundary, it is finite in space-time, and in 1983 he proved this mathematically

                            His two books A Brief History of Time and The Universe in a Nutshell have remained highly popular all over the world and are now classic best-sellers. Anyone interested in the universe, cosmos and how it all began can read them: no previous knowledge in this field is required to enjoy these books. A collection of essays by him - Black Holes and Baby Universes and Other Essays is also extremely popular.


                            In popular culture, he has become a widely admired figure as a genius who has had a successful life despite his severe disability. He had a guest appearance in an episode on the holodeck of the television series Star Trek: The Next Generation, playing poker with Data, Albert Einstein, and Isaac Newton in the episode "Descent, Part I"; perhaps a tribute to his status is that he remains the only person to have appeared as himself in an episode of Star Trek. While passing through the Main Engineering set, Hawking paused near the warp engine, smiled, and said, "I'm working on that." :biggthumb

                            Being remembered chiefly for his science, there is every chance that he would never have made the discoveries he has were it not for the support of his family. Although he divorced Jane in 1990 (they had 3 children - named Tim, Lucy and Robert - and now have a grandchild), Hawking is still something of a family man. Relationships drive him, not physics. In spite of his disease he describes himself as "lucky" - not just because its slow progress allowed him time to make influential discoveries but because it afforded him time to have, in his own words, "a very attractive family"[1] When Jane was asked why she decided to marry a man with a 3-year life expectancy, she responded: "These were the days of atomic gloom and doom, so we all had rather a short life expectancy" :-D. He married his second wife Elaine Mason in 1995.
                            Bazinggaaaa ....

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