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    Musharaff is the target now?


    I hope everything goes well in Pakistan.

    *********************************************
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...-2002Aug9.html

    Attacks in Pakistan Linked
    Aides Tie Strikes on Western Targets to Al Qaeda, Taliban

    By Kamran Khan
    Special to The Washington Post
    Saturday, August 10, 2002; Page A01


    KARACHI, Pakistan, Aug. 9 -- Recent attacks on Christians and Westerners in Pakistan were part of a coordinated campaign by Pakistani Islamic militant groups linked to al Qaeda and the Taliban, military and security sources said today.

    Hours after a grenade attack on a chapel at a Presbyterian hospital killed three people this morning, top security aides to Pakistan's president, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, told him they have intelligence reports that factions of at least two banned Pakistani groups have joined forces to wage attacks on Westerners and Christians, senior officials familiar with the briefing said.

    "The president was told that al Qaeda has waged a proxy war against Pakistan and its key strategic interests," one official said. "Most unfortunately, al Qaeda has been able to exploit Pakistani citizens and its soil for [al Qaeda's] ulterior motives."

    Security officials said that the top leaders of the banned groups, Harkat ul-Mujaheddin and Jaish-i-Muhammad, voluntarily informed Pakistani intelligence officials that some of their "trained elements" have broken ranks to form "anti-Christian, anti-West" strike groups.

    "A full-fledged local al Qaeda is now active in Pakistan," a security official said. "We have got it from the horse's mouth."

    Harkat ul-Mujaheddin and Jaish-i-Muhammad are two of the most prominent Pakistani Islamic militant groups supporting a 13-year-old guerrilla war in the divided region of Kashmir that is aimed at ending Indian rule there. Pakistan's government supported the insurrection in Kashmir, but after agreeing to back the U.S. military campaign in Afghanistan and assist U.S. anti-terrorism efforts, Musharraf banned several Islamic militant groups, including Harkat ul-Mujaheddin and Jaish-i-Muhammad.

    Both have been linked to al Qaeda and the Taliban and are widely reported to have sent guerrillas to Afghanistan for training in camps operated by al Qaeda. But sources said the splinter groups have disassociated themselves from the Kashmiri cause and are focused solely on killing Westerners.

    "They may not be more than a few dozen in number, but these guys are on a do-or-die mission," said a paramilitary intelligence official who said he interrogated four suspected terrorists of Harkat ul-Mujaheddin al-Almi, the breakaway faction of Harkat ul-Mujaheddin. All four suspects, the official said, admitted participating in a car bomb attack on the U.S. Consulate in Karachi on June 14, which claimed the lives of 11 Pakistanis and the bomber.

    The Pakistani strike forces are said to be coordinating closely with members of al Qaeda and the Taliban who have been scattered on both sides of the Afghan-Pakistani border since U.S. air power and Afghan militia groups ended Taliban rule in Afghanistan late last year. U.S. troops continue to search for al Qaeda and Taliban holdouts in Afghanistan, and Pakistani forces have been working with U.S. Special Forces troops to do the same in Pakistan.

    "There seems to be some coordination in the recently reported hit-and-run operations in Afghanistan and the terrorist strikes in Pakistan," a senior Pakistani intelligence official said. Another declared: "There is a Karachi-Kabul connection, and it is becoming clearer every day."

    Karachi, a port city of 10 million, has been the scene of much of the recent violence directed at Westerners. Wall Street Journal correspondent Daniel Pearl was kidnapped there on Jan. 23, and his remains were recovered there on May 17. A prominent Jaish-i-Muhammad operative, Sheik Omar Saeed, and three others were convicted of murdering Pearl.

    A bomb exploded in front of a hotel in Karachi on May 8, killing 11 French engineers and three others, including the bomber. The attempted car bombing of the U.S. Consulate occurred five weeks later.

    The attacks have not, however, been limited to Karachi. A militant attacked a Protestant church in Islamabad on March 17, killing five people, including two Americans; six Pakistanis were killed when gunmen assaulted a Christian school in Murree on Monday; and three Pakistani nurses were slain today at the Presbyterian-supported hospital in Taxila, 25 miles west of Islamabad, Pakistan's capital.

    News services reported that three men, one of them b*****shing a pistol, ran through the front gate of the hospital, locked two watchmen into a guard booth and threw grenades at women who were leaving a chapel on the hospital grounds.

    "The attackers targeted the female worshipers as they were leaving the church," said the chief of police for Taxila, Syed Marvat Shah. "The terrorists knew that their target will be innocent women and children because they dominate the church attendance on weekdays."

    At least 25 other people were wounded, half of them seriously. Witnesses told police that the man who led the attack was killed by his two accomplices while fleeing the hospital compound, according to an intelligence official involved in the investigation.

    The attack took place four days after several gunmen raided the Murree Christian School about 40 miles east of the capital, but managed to kill only six Pakistanis who worked there. Authorities in Taxila said today that they believed the two attacks were carried out by the same group.

    "We have drawn the conclusion that a group of between 15 to 20 terrorists is actively trying to kill Christians and Westerners to express their anger against Pakistan's support for the United States in the war against terrorism," chief police inspector Raja Mumtaz Ahmad told the Associated Press.

    "It looks to be the same chain of terrorists," said S.K. Tresslor, the minister for minority affairs. "It is clear that terrorists are targeting the Christian community in Pakistan."

    The contention by Musharraf's security aides that the attacks in Pakistan were linked to al Qaeda reinforced similar conclusions made in recent months by Pakistani authorities. Officials first suggested in May that al Qaeda and Pakistani militants were working together, and evidence continued to mount.

    Pakistani intelligence officials said they have found new indications that the attack on the French engineers was coordinated between local and Arab al Qaeda operatives.

    "The Frenchmen were specifically punished for their country's long-standing support for the Northern Alliance and its consistent anti-Taliban posture," one official said, referring to the Afghan militia that worked closely with U.S. forces to bring down the Taliban, a radical Islamic movement that provided a haven for Osama bin Laden and his al Qaeda organization in Afghanistan.

    Pakistani officials also said they have gathered intelligence showing that a former Afghan militia commander, Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, recently contacted his former sympathizers in Pakistan to solicit funds for a new holy war in Afghanistan.

    Hekmatyar, whose fight against the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan in the 1980s was supported by the Pakistani government and the CIA, has vowed to oust the post-Taliban Afghan government of President Hamid Karzai. He has been reported to be operating out of southern Afghanistan and western Pakistan, but his precise whereabouts are not publicly known.

    "There seems to be no dearth of weapons and ammunition for the new generation of rebels inside Afghanistan, but they are clearly running short of funds," said a Pakistani official. Hekmatyar, an ethnic Pashtun, apparently is trying to cash in on mounting sentiments among Pashtuns that Karzai's government is dominated by ethnic Tajiks from the Northern Alliance, the official said.

    Officials said there is also mounting intelligence that some Islamic militants have vowed to kill Musharraf for his support of the United States in its war against terrorism. Pakistani officials have ordered unprecedented security measures for the president, who is now being guarded by the Pakistani army's Special Services Group.

    Musharraf travels with a decoy motorcade, and his schedule is frequently changed and never announced in advance. Several times in recent weeks, the locations of official functions at which he was expected to appear were changed at the last minute.

    #2
    Well, it was to be expected, taliban were sculptured in pakistan and the roots are still there. It has been debated here before whom he should have supported, the military might of the US or the Taliban. And he made a very wise, calculated decision, with long term ramifications, which was in Pakistan best interest. His life is in danger, yah that was to be expected, etiher way. Had he supported the extremist pro-taliban, pro-alqaida groups, his life would have been in danger as well as the sovereignty of Pakistan. He is in Catch 22.

    ------------------
    But now I have learned to listen to silence. To hear its choirs singing the song of ages, chanting the hymns of space and disclosing the secrets of eternity..
    Khalil Gibran
    I am only responsible for what I say, not for what you understand.

    Comment


      #3
      Musharraf, no doubt, is the target.

      Does he really looks like scare?

      Comment


        #4
        I agree with u all, but the irony of the situiation is that we 25 % who r educated in pakistans population can understand what difficult times we are going through ...... and thoes people of pakistan who are helping AL Qaeda and are part of this proxy war , what about them , thesse are people who have no regard to pakistans soverignity and have not learnt a lesson from the afghan war.
        Not a day passes that i dont think about the safety of my country.

        Pakistan Zindabad

        PS I am the same peron who used to message as Jamadar but lost my nick and password cause of inactive email.
        I hate you.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Pakistani Tiger:
          Musharraf, no doubt, is the target.

          Does he really looks like scare?


          The general, who has been known to carry a gun, shrugs off the danger. Says wife Sehba: "I do the major worrying." But a friend of Musharraf's confides, "He should be scared—he is scared."

          http://www.time.com/time/asia/covers...722/story.html

          Comment


            #6
            scared of what??when he faced the fire at the time that he came to power he knew well enough what a lot of khichri=Pakistan
            I say salutes to him and way to go
            as for threats to life.He is a soldier he knows how frivilous life is.As long as one fought and fough hard till the end, somene will live through the war to tell your story; that you fought well.
            As for the hypocrites who attack innocent people,children and target people of a certain race,culture or religion..boo to them Faceless they were and faceless they will remain..if only the pepole of Pakistan could stand upto these people also.
            I hope the General will come down harder on people who are hypocrites and kill mercilessly..

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by rvikz:

              The general, who has been known to carry a gun, shrugs off the danger. Says wife Sehba: "I do the major worrying." But a friend of Musharraf's confides, "He should be scared—he is scared."

              http://www.time.com/time/asia/covers...722/story.html
              At least he is better then "Vajpayyee on a CHaarpayee"
              who is caried on a wheel chair to the toilet also.......
              I think its time for him to rest at home then to run a country ........
              yar "rvikz" burhapa bari boree cheez hai....

              PS rvikz... check "indian bride" in the image gallery..... u'll know what i mean.

              [This message has been edited by Poodenay_Ki_Chutney (edited August 10, 2002).]

              [This message has been edited by Poodenay_Ki_Chutney (edited August 11, 2002).]
              I hate you.

              Comment


                #8
                [QUOTE]Originally posted by rvikz:

                The general, who has been known to carry a gun, shrugs off the danger. Says wife Sehba: "I do the major worrying." But a friend of Musharraf's confides, "He should be scared—he is scared."


                Dude, why you taking consideration of Musharraf's unknown fellow?



                [QUOTE]

                Comment


                  #9
                  What's wrong with a military general carrying a gun? Given the current explosive climate and the number of rabid mullahs that want his you know what, Mush will be dumb not to carry a gun and other safeguards. My concern is for him as a man as well as the keys he carries (not physical ones). Hopefully by now the keys are safe.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by ArjunMahavir:
                    What's wrong with a military general carrying a gun? Given the current explosive climate and the number of rabid mullahs that want his you know what, Mush will be dumb not to carry a gun and other safeguards. My concern is for him as a man as well as the keys he carries (not physical ones). Hopefully by now the keys are safe.


                    He sent me the "keys" yesterday .... I am still lookin for a key chain for them.




                    [This message has been edited by Pakora (edited August 12, 2002).]
                    I love you too.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      By the way..military personnell are authorised to carry weapons.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by ArjunMahavir:
                        What's wrong with a military general carrying a gun? Given the current explosive climate and the number of rabid mullahs that want his you know what, Mush will be dumb not to carry a gun and other safeguards. My concern is for him as a man as well as the keys he carries (not physical ones). Hopefully by now the keys are safe.

                        How dumb can you get? He needs to carry a gun? May I remind you that some of the best men, trained to fry Indian dirt bags are used for his protections...

                        Comment


                          #13
                          No one can mess with the military in Pakistan!

                          Comment

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