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Democracy for peace & progress

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    Democracy for peace & progress

    A breadthtakingly clear piece of thinking. I give you an excerpt but please click link and read the whole article when you can.

    quote from Dr Farrukh Saleem:

    I'll just restrict myself to empirical evidence alone. To begin with, let us take an account of wars during the second half of the 20th century. In this 50-year period, there have been some three-dozen international conflicts including the Falkland Islands War, Iran-Iraq War, Vietnam War, Korean War, Indo-Pak War of 1965 and 1971, Yom Kippur War, Suez War, Rwanda-Burundi War, Bosnia-Herzegovina War and the Soviet-Afghan War. Then there have been several bloody civil wars including the one in Cambodia, Laos, Mozambique, Columbia, Sudan, Somalia, Afghanistan and Nicaragua.

    In the Falkland Islands War it was Argentina versus the United Kingdom. Democratically elected Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher versus Lieutenant-General Loepoldo Galtieri who had captured the presidency by force. In the Iran-Iraq War neither of the combatants were democracies. Both the Vietnam War and the Korean War were a case of a democracy against non-democratic regimes.

    In 1965, it was General Ayub Khan against the democratically elected Lal Bahadur Shastri. In 1971, it was General Agha Mohammed Yahya Khan on the one side and Prime Minister Indira Gandhi on the other. In the Yom Kippur War, Israel, a democracy, was on one side while Egypt and Syria, both non-democratic, were on the other (Egypt and Syria were backed by Iraq and Jordan and financed by Saudi Arabia). In the Suez War, it was Egypt's non-democratic leader Gamal Abdel Nasser against the democratically elected Prime Minister David Ben Gurion.

    Empirical evidence spread over the past half a century suggests at least three things. First, democracies don't fight with each other (they do however fight with other non-democratic regimes). Second, democracies, almost always, win wars. Third, non-democratic countries are prone to civil wars.

    http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/index.html
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