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    Why listen to a failed politician?

    Honesty and Corruption http://www.syberwurx.com/nation/dail...ditor/opi3.htm
    Air Marshal (Retd) Mohammad Asghar Khan
    Some time ago I was invited to address the Lahore High Court Bar Association. Before I had started to speak a lawyer amongst the audience said that he wanted to ask me a question. “Why should anyone listen to you. You are a failure in politics” he said. I replied that there were two good reasons why they should listen to me. The first, was that I had not come there on my own but had been invited by the President of the High Court Bar Association, the second is a question they should ask themselves, “which Pakistani politician has been a success?”
    “You would, probably name Sheikh Mujib-ur-Rehman and Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto”, I said. “Both received a massive mandate in the 1970 elections and were acclaimed the popular leaders of Pakistan. Sheikh Mujib-ur-Rehman, did not come up to the people’s expectations, rapidly lost his popularity and was murdered. Zulfiqar All Bhutto, was sentenced to death in a dubious trial. Both had been responsible in varying degrees for the break-up of Pakistan. These were the two leaders who by your standards were successful politicians. I am glad that I am not one of them”, I said.
    Having given Bhutto a massive mandate in the 1970 elections, the people had high expectations and when they saw that he was not moving in the direction that he had promised, they realised that they had been fooled. Had he tried to do what he had promised, the people, the majority of whom believed that they had found a messiah, would have risen in revolt and he could not have been hanged. The voices raised in his defence and appeals for mercy did not have the people’s support to the extent that was necessary for Ziaul Haq to change his decision.
    I had launched a movement to free Zulfiqar Au Bhutto in 1968 during Ayub Khan’s time and when he was released from jail, he had asked me to join him. He said that we both, he and I, had large public followings and together could dislodge Ayub Khan. I asked him what was his programme if he came to power. He laughed and said that I was ‘naive’. “My programme is to fool the people. They are ‘fools’ and I know how to make a fool of them. Join me and we will rule for twenty years. No one will be able to remove us”, he said. I was an idealist then, as I am now and said that this was a shocking approach to politics and that I would oppose him from that day. He laughed and said “try it, you will see that I am fight”. I opposed him in the 1970 elections and continued to oppose him after he assumed power. The five years of his rule and my experiences in police encounters, is a long story which does not properly belong here. Suffice it to say that in the Punjab and in Sindh the people generally were not prepared to listen to me. My meetings were often disrupted and the people were not prepared to believe that Bhutto was not sincere in fulfilling the promises that he had made. “Give him a chance” they used to say. I continued my crusade until five years later the people realised that they had been fooled.
    The government’s role in the rigging of elections, has also been a feature of our political life. Yahya Khan’s election of 1970 is the only election in which the well known methods of rigging the election were not used. Yahya Khan had appreciated that no political party would emerge with a clear majority and that he would be able to manage the different political groups that would constitute the National Assembly. But here too there was at least one exception. It was reported in the press a few days before the 1970 election, that Sheikh Mujib-ur-Rehman was asked at Dacca’s Kurmitola Airport that if he was to win the elections and become the Prime Minister of Pakistan, who would he have as the president of the country? He had replied that is the case of his becoming the Prime Minister, the President would have to be from West Pakistan. He said that he thought that Asghar Khan would be the best choice for this office. I am not aware whether this statement of Sheikh Mujibur Rehman led Yahya Khan or the administration to interfere in my Rawalpindi constituency but a few examples illustrate some of the unusual methods applied. During the election campaign, I was hospitalised with a slipped disc in the combined Military Hospital in Rawalpindi where I was visited by Agha Mohammad Ali, Yahya Khan’s brother and Director of the Intelligence Bureau.
    He brought a hard board which he said the president had sent for me to sleep on, as this was helpful in cases of spinal disorders. I told him that I was already using this and asked him to thank the President for his concern. When he left, I noticed that he had left behind a small suit case which he had brought with him. I opened this and found it to be full of currency notes. I telephoned and asked him to come to the hospital. When he came the next day I told him that he had left behind a suit case full of currency notes. He replied that this was a gift from the President for me as I would need this in the elections. I asked him to take it away, thank the President and tell him that I would do without his help. A few days before the elections, some junior commissioned and non commissioned officers of the President’s bodyguard came to my election office in uniform, to tell me that the President had ordered his bodyguard to vote for me. I had continued my election campaign without any contact with the President or with the administration when three days before the elections, some of my important political workers were arrested without any reason and locked up in a police station in Rawalpindi. Arbab Hidayatullah, a fine and upright police officer, was the DIG Police at Rawalpindi and I asked him why this had been done. He was surprised and on making enquires was told that this had been done on orders from ‘above’. He ordered them to be released. Apart from these odd incidents and the apparent interest of the president in the Rawalpindi constituency, I think the 1970 elections were generally free and fair.
    Money has been used blatantly to buy politicians in all elections since 1988. My case against such politicians is still pending in the Supreme Court since 1996. It was disclosed by the Minister for the Interior in the National Assembly in 1994 that politicians and public figures, amongst them, caretaker Prime Ministers, Senators, Members of National and Provincial Assemblies had been paid money to buy their loyalties. I had asked that steps be taken to obviate the possibility of this happening again and that those who had disbursed these funds and received this money should be dealt with under the law.
    The list of those who received these large amounts contains some so called eminent politicians and religious leaders who are still free to contest the elections being held in October and to provide a ‘clean’ political leadership to this unfortunate nation. Had the Supreme Court had the time to deal with this case the country could have been purged of the army of corrupt politicians who have over the years, made a mockery of democracy in Pakistan.
    Honesty in a wider sense includes all actions of an individual in which he is required to act correctly and corruption includes those actions of an individual which are improper, though they may not involve the use of money. In 1942, Martial Law had been imposed in Sindh to suppress the ‘Hur’ disturbances. I was stationed as the part of a Flight gut of an Indian Air Force Squadron in Hyderabad to carry out reconnaissance and to support land operations against the Hurs. A couple of days after we arrived there, Major General Richardson, the Martial Law Administrator of Sindh, arrived at the Airfield and ordered my Flight Commander, Flight Lieutenant Om Parkash Mehra (later Chief of Air Staff of the Indian Air Force and the Governor of Bombay) to destroy a convoy proceeding east with the Pir of Pagara, about ten miles from Sanghar. Mehra ordered me to lead the flight. The General said this was a very important mission and that he would wait there for our return. We took off from Hyderabad Airfield and spotted the convoy of about a dozen camels with some women, children and men, who on seeing the aircraft ran in different directions. They did not appear to be armed or if they were, they made no effort to retaliate. There was no cover and they had nowhere to hide. Seeing this, I decided that to shoot down unarmed civilians in this manner was not justified and led my flight back to Hyderabad without taking any action. On landing I was asked by the General as to what had happened. I told him. The General was furious and ordered Mehra to take up the aircraft and complete the mission which I had not carried out. Mehra left with four aircraft and returned about an hour later to tell the General that he had not been successful in locating the caravan. By then, dusk had set in and the visibility did not permit another flight. The General left in anger and our squadron was ordered to move to Kohat the next day. My reaction to the General’s orders was correct as I felt that the orders that I had been given were illegal and improper. I knew that I was duty bound to obey only lawful commands and the General’s order was not a ‘lawful command’.
    Throughout my political career and particularly during Bhutto’s time, on numerous occasions, I exhorted the police to obey only lawful commands of their superior officers. It was their duty, I reminded them, to disobey a command that they knew to be illegal. This is intellectual honesty.
    In the mid 90’s the Inspector General of Police, Punjab, in reply to a question in a press conference in Lahore about the unsatisfactory law and order situation in the province had replied that the Punjab Police had recruited about 25,000 people with a criminal record, many of whom were in charge of police stations. When asked why this had been done, he said the Chief Minister had ordered the recruitments. He said he had been over-ruled. During the Chief Ministership of Sindh of Jam Sadiq Ali, during Mian Nawaz Sharif’s Prime Ministership, about 20,000 similar kind of people had been recruited in the Sindh police, many of whom dacoits, who were placed directly in charge of police stations. In my view all those persons who were in any way connected with these activities, lacked moral character and in a wider sense, were corrupt.
    In 1998 the Supreme Court was led by an upright Chief Justice, which sadly has not always been the case. Justice Sajjad Ali Shah had earlier ruled Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto’s dismissal by the President as unjustified. For this and to obviate the possibility of the Supreme Court interfering with the undemocratic powers that Nawaz Sharif wanted to assume, it was decided to get rid of Justice Shah. So one fine morning in — the Supreme Court was charged by Muslim League supporters led by Senators, Members of the National and Province Assemblies.
    The police was present in and outside the Supreme Court premises throughout and did nothing to stop this hooliganism. The Chief Justice contacted the Chief of the Army Staff, General Jehangir Karamat and reminded him that the Court was entitled to protection and since the police was not performing its duties, he was seeking his help. The Army Chief replied he would refer the matter to the Defence Minister, in this case, Nawaz Sharif. Later when on a complaint filed by Ardeshir Cowasjee, the crusader of lost causes, a bench of the Supreme Court comprising many of the same judges who were on the bench assaulted by Nawaz’s hooligans, ruled that no proof had been provided to justify a conviction. This was in spite of the fact that the judges on the bench were themselves witnesses to the whole episode and a film recording of the entire incident was available to the Court from a video facility installed in the Supreme Court building.
    Later after considerable public criticism when an appeal was heard some of the miscreants, amongst them parliamentarians of the Ruling Party were given light sentences. On their release from Jail a few days later, they were treated like heroes, garlanded and brought out in triumph. During the 55 years of Pakistan’s history the higher judiciary except with a few honourable exceptions, has shown a lack of character and courage that has brought discredit to this institution which should be the guardian of the people’s rights. This incident will probably rank as the worst example of imbecility ever displayed by the government of any country that claims to be democratic. This was another example of intellectual corruption to which those in high office, in countries where democracy have not taken roots, often fall prey.
    The ‘fog’ of power blinds people to rationalise to an extent that makes a mockery of the law. We have also seen a Prime Minister who was in business bending the rules and changing them frequently to ensure that his business benefited. For example import duties were often reduced or removed when equipment required for a particular industry or plant was due to arrive and re-imposed a few days after the shipment had been off-loaded.
    In a country where such traditions have taken root, to remain honest in politics is no mean achievement. To succeed in being elected by dubious means or to bend the law as is so often done for personal gains, is considered the hall mark of a successful politician. Those who do not, are considered, as the Lahore Lawyer said, “failures in politics”.
    How can a man die better than facing fearful odds for the ashes of his fathers and the Temple of his Gods?

    #2
    Now that some of these leaders he has mentioned and quoted are dead, Air Marshall sahib can come up with all the lies he can, but he will still remain where he is...

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Spock:
      Now that some of these leaders he has mentioned and quoted are dead, Air Marshall sahib can come up with all the lies he can, but he will still remain where he is...

      Bhutto was probably amongst the worst leaders Pak has ever had....any ways that my opinion you don't have to belive it..... but there is one thing that I will say... Asghar Khan has proved himself as a true Pakistani.. he helped set up one of the deadliest air forces in the world... so I would trust him over what you are saying regarding him lying anyday...

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Bhadsha:

        Bhutto was probably amongst the worst leaders Pak has ever had
        BB not ZAB

        LONG LIVE PAKISTAN

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Pakistani Tiger:
          BB not ZAB

          LONG LIVE PAKISTAN
          Like daughter like father.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Abdali:
            Like daughter like father.
            .... and the whole nation loved Z A bhutto and still does.. the whole world knows Pakistan produced in shape of Z A bhutto a world class leader of muslim world and architect of the only Islamic Bomb in the world
            with except few army boot lickers and sold out souls!!
            Saints are fine for Heaven, but they are hell on earth.

            Comment


              #7
              Asghar Khan retired just six weeks before the 1965 war, he commanded the PAF for 8 years before that, and it was he who perfected the PAF, equipped it, organized it and it was this PAF that saved Lahore and Pakistan in 1965.

              My dad was in the Air Force, and I "think" I remember him praising Asghar Khan as a principled person.

              Asghar Khan is also known as "Mr. Clean" in Pakistani politics.

              Plus, he raised a good son in Omar Asghar Khan who did alot of social work in Pakistan.

              "When one bright intellect meets another bright intellect, the light increases and the Way becomes clear." - Rumi

              Comment


                #8
                This article's comments about Bhutto reminded me of this article I just read:

                Some Conscienceless Ex-Rulers of Pakistan

                By Mohammad Gill, Detroit, Michigan

                To adequately cover such a topic as the title suggests actually needs the space of a voluminous book but I’ll try to get my point across by presenting some documentary evidence, to portray the character of three rulers of Pakistan, namely Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto (ZAB), General Zia-ul-Haq, and the charismatic Benazir Bhutto (BB).


                In 1969, ZAB was out of power having been ousted from the government by the strongman President Ayub Khan. But his promising future hovered on the horizon of Pakistan, as he himself, and a common person in the street, very well knew. It was just a matter of time. Bhutto had held in the past, the very prestigious office of the foreign minister of Pakistan.


                Sherbaz Khan Mazari has narrated an incident in his book “A Journey to Disillusionment” (p.164) which shows the most degrading trait of ZAB’s character. Mazari writes, “In July 1969 I was to invite Bhutto and his wife to my house. The occasion was a visit to Pakistan by Bob Lebacq, then Belgian Ambassador to Indonesia, and his wife Jessie. The Lebacqs had previously been posted at Karachi and had become good friends with Souriya and I. While here they had also established very cordial relationships with Zulfikar and Nusrat Bhutto. I hosted a dinner for them and invited all their friends and acquaintances at Karachi, including the Bhuttos…Later in the evening, I noticed two of my guests engaged in what seemed to be a rather earnest conversation. I decided to join them and seated myself beside Bhutto and Hank Ramsay, the local US Consul General. Bhutto was reassuring the American Diplomat that he was not anti-American, as every one assumed he was.He asked the diplomat to inform the government that whatever he said was simply politics and should not be taken as his personal view, and if anything, his personal views were completely opposite. After a while having done his best to convince the diplomat of his American sympathies, I recall Bhutto requesting a favour from him. He wanted a place at Radcliffe College for his daughter Benazir Bhutto. Ramsay said he would speak to his superiors in Washington to convey the request. He then asked about Benazir’s grades, Bhutto looking a bit abashed replied, ‘I am afraid they are not particularly good. That is why I, as a former foreign minister of this country, will request it as a special favour from the State Department. Please do ask your people to help me out on this one’.” If the rulers of a country are beggars, what would one expect from an ordinary citizen? This is only a rhetorical question; an ordinary person in Pakistan has greater sense of self-respect and national dignity. There are many such other instances, which show that ZAB was a mean, time-server, sycophant, rude, insolent, discourteous, abuser of friends, manipulator, and exploiter. He was also a very educated person, had a very deep insight into foreign affairs, and was the father of the Islamic Bomb that Pakistan was finally able to manufacture in defiance of international opposition and blackmail. Unfortunately, a good quality in a man’s character does not cancel out and nullify an evil trait. Both of them exist simultaneously. Bhutto was an unfortunate blend of the good and the evil.


                Zia-ul-Haq was an ordinary man. He would have died an ordinary man had Bhutto not promoted him Chief of Army Staff over the head of so many other senior generals. Why did Bhutto bring a nondescript and a non-entity to the foremost rank of the army? Obviously, out of self-interest. He thought he would be able to manipulate Zia according to his own whims and keep the army on a tight leash and from meddling in his government. It was part of the usual shrewd and cunning strategy of Bhutto but it backfired. The ‘yes sir’ of an army general outsmarted the sophisticated and slick politician. It proved to be the greatest miscalculation on the part of shrewd Bhutto. Zia not only toppled Bhutto’s government but sent him to the gallows also. Zia was the most unsophisticated and politically uncouth dictator that Pakistan ever had. He despised the rule of law in whatever form. He was arbitrary and capricious. This is what he said addressing a press conference in Teheran (“Pakistan - A Dream Gone Sour,” Roedad Khan, Oxford University Press, 1997, pp. 87-88):


                “What is the Constitution? It is a booklet with ten or twelve pages. I can tear them up and say that from tomorrow we shall live under a different system. Is there anybody to stop me? Today the people will follow wherever I lead. All the politicians including the once mighty Bhutto will follow me with their tails wagging.”



                Zia was Bhutto’s lackey; Bhutto was the measure of power for him. Zia kow-towed to him with the servility of the most ordinary army soldier, while Bhutto was in power. Zia believed he could subdue anyone once he had deposed Bhutto. May be he was right; there was nobody who could tell him, “Your Majesty, you have no clothes on; you are starkly naked”.


                Benazir Bhutto, when she came into power after Zia’s tragic death, had opened the floodgates of corruption and nepotism. Corruption, bribery, and nepotism had been rampant in other governments also, unfortunately corruption has become a way of life in Pakistan, but new heights were reached during BB’s first tenure. Not that her second tenure was any better or the intervening governments of Nawaz Sharif fared any better. In the end, she was deposed by President Ghulam Ishaq Khan, who mandated fresh elections.


                BB was so disgruntled after her deposition that she had no scruples in stooping down to the lowest level of indignity, for seeking help to return to power. Daughter of a beggarly father she resorted to begging help from friends and foes, without caring for the norms of self-respect, patriotism, and national dignity. A copy of a letter that she wrote to American Senator Peter Galbraith is given below which illustrates how low did BB go in the quest of power (“Nawaz Sharif Ka Pehla Daur-e-Hakoomat,” Professor Ghafoor Ahmad, Al-Qamar Enterprises, Ghazni Street, Urdu Bazar, Lahore, 1997, p.55).


                Mrs. Benazir Bhutto


                Bilawal House Karachi

                Dear Peter Galbraith:


                I don’t know how to thank you, for your favors to me and my family. As you know that the orders of my dismissal were drafted in the JAG branch of the GHQ, and it was not possible for me to pull along with the army and they subverted my government.


                I have already communicated to various friends in the Congress and especially Stephen Solarz, to use their good office with the President Bush, so as to put maximum pressure on President Ishaq, and the army in Pakistan, that they do not disqualify me from the elections, as it will be unjust and negation of all democratic principles for which we have struggled.


                It would be most appropriate if military as well as economic assistance to Pakistan is stopped, and all the international agencies like the World Bank, IMF, are told to squeeze the Government of Pakistan and if possible all supply to Pakistan should be disrupted so that normal life in Pakistan comes to stand still.


                As long as I was the Prime Minister, I kept a check on the nuclear device, but now I do not know what are the plans of the Government.


                The suspension of F-16 and its spares will bring the army to its senses.


                Dear Peter, please use your influence on V.P. Singh, the Indian Prime Minister, to engage the Pakistan army on the borders, so that they do not impede my way. I wish Rajiv Gandhi had been the Prime Minister of India, things would have been easier.


                Thank you and with warm regards.


                Sincerely Yours


                Sgd. Benazir Bhutto



                Dated: 24-09-1990 What could one say about BB’s character and sense of patriotism? The letter said it all. One wonders why she was not apprehended and tried in a court of law, on the charge of trying to conspire with India to sabotage national interests?
                "When one bright intellect meets another bright intellect, the light increases and the Way becomes clear." - Rumi

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Bhadsha:

                  Bhutto was probably amongst the worst leaders Pak has ever had....any ways that my opinion you don't have to belive it..... but there is one thing that I will say... Asghar Khan has proved himself as a true Pakistani.. he helped set up one of the deadliest air forces in the world... so I would trust him over what you are saying regarding him lying anyday...
                  Come on man, he was one of the best leaders this nation ever had. Forget his daughter, but he was skilled and was capable to govern this nation, unlike some other rulers/dictators that just want to remain in power with their pockets full...

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Degas:
                    .... and the whole nation loved Z A bhutto and still does.. the whole world knows Pakistan produced in shape of Z A bhutto a world class leader of muslim world and architect of the only Islamic Bomb in the world
                    with except few army boot lickers and sold out souls!!
                    Yeah the whole world knows the architect of declaring Ahmedis kaffirs and splitting the country in two. Don't ask for more attributes of this SOB. I am glad he got what he deserved and not a single Pakistani came out in his support when Zia did the holy work.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Spock:
                      Come on man, he was one of the best leaders this nation ever had. Forget his daughter, but he was skilled and was capable to govern this nation, unlike some other rulers/dictators that just want to remain in power with their pockets full...


                      I said its my opinion... but what I will say is that even the lowest of Pakistani leaders have done some good for the nation... such as NS made the motorway project..... BB hmmmm... I'm sure she did some good to I just can't think of anything at the momment..... ZAB... he did some good by raising the profile of the poor... I dislike the man because he never had any principles (true Mechavellian)..... As well his economic policies structurally ruined Pakistan and its educational system..... those are the main reasons for my hatred towards him....

                      Comment


                        #12
                        quoted by sallu:
                        Mrs. Benazir Bhutto


                        Bilawal House Karachi

                        Dear Peter Galbraith:


                        I don’t know how to thank you, for your favors to me and my family. As you know that the orders of my dismissal were drafted in the JAG branch of the GHQ, and it was not possible for me to pull along with the army and they subverted my government.


                        I have already communicated to various friends in the Congress and especially Stephen Solarz, to use their good office with the President Bush, so as to put maximum pressure on President Ishaq, and the army in Pakistan, that they do not disqualify me from the elections, as it will be unjust and negation of all democratic principles for which we have struggled.


                        It would be most appropriate if military as well as economic assistance to Pakistan is stopped, and all the international agencies like the World Bank, IMF, are told to squeeze the Government of Pakistan and if possible all supply to Pakistan should be disrupted so that normal life in Pakistan comes to stand still.


                        As long as I was the Prime Minister, I kept a check on the nuclear device, but now I do not know what are the plans of the Government.


                        The suspension of F-16 and its spares will bring the army to its senses.


                        Dear Peter, please use your influence on V.P. Singh, the Indian Prime Minister, to engage the Pakistan army on the borders, so that they do not impede my way. I wish Rajiv Gandhi had been the Prime Minister of India, things would have been easier.


                        Thank you and with warm regards.


                        Sincerely Yours


                        Sgd. Benazir Bhutto


                        Dated: 24-09-1990 What could one say about BB’s character and sense of patriotism? The letter said it all. One wonders why she was not apprehended and tried in a court of law, on the charge of trying to conspire with India to sabotage national interests?
                        This letter is clear proof of her mentality. She will do anything to get that seat of power, even if she has to compromise Pakistan's national interests. It is for this very reason, that Pak Military keeps sensitive information away from these politicians as much as they can. She should be hung for treason. yeh "Like father, like daughter".



                        ------------------
                        "#define QUESTION ((bb) | | !(bb))" — Shakespeare
                        I am only responsible for what I say, not for what you understand.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by 5Abi:
                          quoted by sallu:
                          This letter is clear proof of her mentality. She will do anything to get that seat of power, even if she has to compromise Pakistan's national interests. It is for this very reason, that Pak Military keeps sensitive information away from these politicians as much as they can. She should be hung for treason. yeh "Like father, like daughter".

                          Mr. 5Abi... I've been telling people here for many years that this whole faamily is bunch of crooks... first her father split Pakistan then that wasn't enough so he further caused problem to Pakistan by declaring Ahmedi's non-muslim....

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Sallu- What a load of BS! When she was PM and made her Washingtonb trip, her main point was to get the F16's! Where did you get this so-called letter of BB from?!

                            Bhadsah- it's obvious you have hate for the Bhuttos for some personal reason, but don't act like Bengalis seperated just because of Bhutto.

                            As for people talking about Ahmedis, I have never seen them make a fuss about Ahmedis in Pak, except when they use it as an excuse to insult ZAB.

                            [This message has been edited by RealDeal (edited July 17, 2002).]

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by RealDeal:

                              As for people talking about Ahmedis, I have never seen them make a fuss about Ahmedis in Pak, except when they use it as an excuse to insult ZAB.

                              [This message has been edited by RealDeal (edited July 17, 2002).]
                              Oh really Ahmedis are treated like kings and queens. Its perfectly OK to justify declaring them a kaffir when it is no ones business. But you don't see any problem with that bcoz Bhuttos did it.

                              [This message has been edited by Abdali (edited July 17, 2002).]

                              Comment

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