Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Musharraf - Falling into the Yahya syndrome?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Musharraf - Falling into the Yahya syndrome?

    Here's an opinion in Dawn.

    Musharraf - Falling into the Yahya syndrome?

    To lose a war before you have actually lost it sums up the Yahya syndrome. Yahya pitted Pakistan against world opinion in 1971. Having declared Mujib a traitor, he refused to negotiate with him and unleashed the Pakistan army on a civilian population, Pakistan acquired the worst possible world image.

    We lost half of Pakistan thinking that we were saving it. Even Nixon, Pakistan's greatest friend ever in the White House, found it impossible to pull us out of the morass. The contours of the tragic end were visible by March 25, 1971.

    Is Musharraf falling into the Yahya syndrome? Some similarities are discernible. Yahya - the square-jawed military dictator - for a short while earned accolades by arranging Henry Kissinger's visit to China in the summer of 1971. Likewise, Musharraf's stature rose from nadir to zenith between September last year to March this year by declaring war on Al Qaeda and the Taliban and by promising on January 12 to stop what India (and the world) terms "cross-border terrorism".

    Yahya reneged on his promise to hand over power to the victors of the 1970 election. India alleges that Musharraf has not honoured his commitment of January 12. What is our evidence for this indictment? Western press reports, based on western intelligence sources, which normally prove to be more reliable than our own. Besides, as far as I am aware, Pakistan has not contradicted the allegation excepting a belated half-hearted retraction at Almaty.

    If some Mujahideen have been sent to Indian-held Kashmir with official blessings after January 12, it is a severe indictment of President Musharraf. But, if sent without his knowledge or consent, then all is not well in the State of Denmark. Whatever the reason be or not be, a commitment must be honoured. Rarely does a leader on the international stage get a second chance to re-establish credibility. However, there is also the possibility that Pakistan is more sinned against than sinning.

    Pakistan occupied the moral high ground, thanks to "world realities" after 9/11, but this was viewed as a calamitous betrayal by our local fanatics. We appear to be losing this elevated place in neutral eyes. There was little or no sympathy for Pakistan at Almaty. We asked for 'unconditional' talks with India, which in diplomatic parlance means no talk on Kashmir, but the Indian agenda of "cross-border terrorism" remained unchanged.Most nations represented at Almaty impressed on Pakistan to forget talks and concentrate first on "ground realities". Even President Bush, our ally of the moment and in our need to stop the rapid regrouping of Al Qaeda and the Taliban and our local terrorists now taking place in the Pak-Afghan borderlands, used unusually pointed language to chastize Pakistan.

    "He must stop the incursions across the Line of Control" in Kashmir, Mr. Bush said at the White House on Thursday [May 30] morning, using unusually pointed language to scold a crucial ally in the war against terrorism. "He must do so. He said he would do so. We and others are making it clear to him that he must live up to his word." (The New York Times, May 31).

    This is how Pakistan gets psyched out by friends, reviled by enemies, confused at home. Such is the free fall into the Yahya syndrome. What should we do to restore our credibility?

    First, we need to openly debate in the national media the validity of some of the assumptions held in the inner sanctum of power with regard to our Kashmir policy. There is a civil and military lobby which thinks that terror is cost-effective. It certainly is. A few hundred terrorists have pinned down a million-strong Indian army in Kashmir. But then the APHC is the authentic voice of Kashmir. None of the APHC members support terrorism.

    If in the very unlikely event Kashmir is "won" by the militants' action, it will surely descend into the chaos of Afghanistan, past and present. And militants are a loose cannon. Only a political debate at the national level can isolate and expose to reason the 'inner sanctum' of a civil and military power that favours militancy.

    Second, Pakistan has summarily rejected joint patrols proposed last Wednesday by Mr. Vajpayee. Wrong. It should have called for talks with India and the UN observer group with a view to working out practical modalities. Provided joint patrols have equal access to both sides of the LoC, the suggestion merits scrutiny.

    Next, the militants belonging to various Mujahideen camps should be inducted into the country's para-military or armed forces (after adequate screening) and the camps disbanded. It is seldom realized that a substantial number of the Mujahideen regard it as an employment opportunity for lack of any better.

    British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw's idea of a helicopter force to check infiltration across the LoC deserves further consideration. The present UN observer group of 35 persons is minuscule. The UN can be approached "unilaterally" to substantially raise the strength. Their safety should be ensured by our armed forces. Electronic means of surveillance can be used at night to monitor. Let India reject all reasonable proposals for LoC monitoring. Each rejection will further Pakistan's reasonableness.

    Access should be provided to the UN observers to visit the so-called infiltration camps located in Azad Kashmir or Pakistan.

    The all but forgotten Chattisingpura case in which about seventy Sikhs were murdered in Kashmir on the day President Clinton arrived in New Delhi in 2000 needs to be recalled. Pakistan as usual was accused. Investigations made by Indian human rights organizations discovered serious discrepancies in the official investigation. A number of so-called 'terrorists' were killed by the Indian army as a proof of infiltration; the Indian human rights investigation provided conclusive proof that they were innocent villagers butchered by the Indian army. The investigation was derailed or muffled by the Indian government.

    Let memories stretch further back. Both the assassinations of Indira and Rajiv Gandhi were initially pinned on the ISI. India's own investigations never turned up any evidence to this effect.

    It is Pakistan's case that last month's Jammu outrages were in all probability the work of the same terrorist outfit that claims responsibility for the murder of Daniel Pearl, the Islamabad church bombing and the killing in Karachi of the twelve Frenchmen and four Pakistanis involved in the construction of the Agosta submarine project. By any stretch of imagination can such a terror outfit be supported by an official agency of the government?

    If so, our secret agencies have to be working not for Pakistan, but for India - which alone would benefit by a delay in the construction of a vital defence project. Is it not more probable that the terrorist remnants of Al Qaeda, the Taliban and our own have regrouped with an objective that targets both countries and with an aim to trigger a nuclear confrontation?

    Terrorists are like glow-worms (Jugnu) which know they will die after their day of notorious illumination. Being anti-life, the thought that they are the agent provocateurs of a nuclear conflagration is heady tonic for them. The spectre of a nuclear winter does not bother them in the least.

    Pakistan must own up to the errors of its past. Let it come clean. The past is neither the present nor the future. These very thoughts were expressed recently in Dubai by Abdul Ghani Lone - since assassinated for his views.

    United Pakistan was lost not once but several times because we confronted people's wishes with the military means of suppression. We paid no heed to world opinion. The Kashmiris want neither Pakistani terrorists nor Indian hegemony. If we stop exporting militancy, the Kashmiris' wrath will then fall on India which will then face a sullen and rebellious population. Let them enter the Yahya syndrome for a change.

    #2
    Written By M.P. Bhandara

    You were right Talwar. M.P's in India are always on drugs

    LIVE & LET LIVE

    Comment


      #3
      horrible, nightmarish hallucinagenic drugs, which cause one to dream up of all sorts of hideous abominations, such as sitar playing elephants, 4 armed mutants, and a giant, stench producing slug named advani

      ------------------
      Better to die 1000 times in glory than live without honor-Louis VI

      Comment


        #4
        the important thing come out in every confrontation is that pakistan accepts loc
        until the kashmir problem is solved.
        sending NLI or other miltants wont solve the problem . if pakistani army cant cross the
        loc how other proxy forces can cross and drive out indian forces.
        pakistan cant force india to come to negotiating table by using proxies.
        may be palkistan doing to keep the pot boiling . if peace returns nobody will talk about kashmir . kashmir is glue that unites
        pakistan and diverts the attention of people.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by rvikz:
          the important thing come out in every confrontation is that pakistan accepts loc
          until the kashmir problem is solved.
          There would be no LoC if Kashmir Problem solved.

          TAKE YOUR BEST SHOT AT ME

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Warlust:
            horrible, nightmarish hallucinagenic drugs, which cause one to dream up of all sorts of hideous abominations, such as sitar playing elephants, 4 armed mutants, and a giant, stench producing slug named advani

            LOL. That was funny!

            Comment


              #7
              Thanks for proving that the Pakistani press is free...

              Comment


                #8
                M. P. Bhandara is Pakistani. Well, I should restate that. He is a non-Muslim Pakistani. Does his opinion still count?

                Pakistan has to give up Jihadism as a state policy if it wants to become a modern state. Not even China will support Pakistan, if we get into any more Jihadi adventures.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Enough about this jihadism crap... Theres more to the Kashmir problem than just the Indian description of Jihad dodo... Its an indeginous freedom struggle...

                  Can you explain the scores of people in Kashmir carrying out protest demonstrations, strikes against the Government of India... They want their right to self determination...

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by rvikz:
                    ...if pakistani army cant cross the
                    loc how other proxy forces can cross and drive out indian forces...
                    Good. So you now agree there is no infiltration across the LOC. It has taken a long time, but I am glad you now see the light.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Yeah. Once again opinion has become fact. That is the mans opinion. So be it. Does it make him right? That is the question. The answer is no. As can be seen by the present scenerio, India has backed off. From moving the troops and saying we will attack soon, it is now speaking of diplomatic moves. So much for being confident in the Indian army.

                      ------------------
                      It is a pleasure to stand upon the shore, and to see ships tost upon the sea: a pleasure to stand in the window of a castle, and to see a battle and the adventures thereof below: but no pleasure is comparable to standing upon the vantage ground of truth . . . and to see the errors, and wanderings, and mists, and tempests, in the vale below.
                      You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by CM:
                        Yeah. Once again opinion has become fact. That is the mans opinion. So be it. Does it make him right? That is the question. The answer is no. As can be seen by the present scenerio, India has backed off. From moving the troops and saying we will attack soon, it is now speaking of diplomatic moves. So much for being confident in the Indian army.

                        Amid Indian forces on borders, the danger is not over: Musharraf
                        (Updated at 1330 PST)
                        ISLAMABAD: President General Pervez Musharraf said Monday that as long Indian forces stay on borders with capability of taking action at short notice, the danger is not over.

                        "As long as the forces remain deployed and as long as there is a capability, capability of their forces on the borders to change their opinion and change their intention and take action at a short notice, the danger is not over", President said while talking to newsmen at Chaklala Air Base prior to his departure for three day visit to United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia.


                        Comment


                          #13
                          Talwar forgot to highlight this in the article so I'am highlighting it here:

                          The all but forgotten Chattisingpura case in which about seventy Sikhs were murdered in Kashmir on the day President Clinton arrived in New Delhi in 2000 needs to be recalled. Pakistan as usual was accused. Investigations made by Indian human rights organizations discovered serious discrepancies in the official investigation. A number of so-called 'terrorists' were killed by the Indian army as a proof of infiltration; the Indian human rights investigation provided conclusive proof that they were innocent villagers butchered by the Indian army. The investigation was derailed or muffled by the Indian government.

                          Let memories stretch further back. Both the assassinations of Indira and Rajiv Gandhi were initially pinned on the ISI. India's own investigations never turned up any evidence to this effect.




                          ------------------
                          I see the eigenvalue in thine eye,
                          I hear the tender tensor in thy sigh.
                          Bernoulli would have been content to die
                          Had he but known such a-squared cos 2(phi)!

                          -- Stanislaw Lem, "Cyberiad"
                          I am only responsible for what I say, not for what you understand.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by 5Abi:
                            Talwar forgot to highlight this in the article so I'am highlighting it here:

                            The all but forgotten Chattisingpura case in which about seventy Sikhs were murdered in Kashmir on the day President Clinton arrived in New Delhi in 2000 needs to be recalled. Pakistan as usual was accused. Investigations made by Indian human rights organizations discovered serious discrepancies in the official investigation. A number of so-called 'terrorists' were killed by the Indian army as a proof of infiltration; the Indian human rights investigation provided conclusive proof that they were innocent villagers butchered by the Indian army. The investigation was derailed or muffled by the Indian government.

                            Let memories stretch further back. Both the assassinations of Indira and Rajiv Gandhi were initially pinned on the ISI. India's own investigations never turned up any evidence to this effect.


                            He's so good at scoring own goals that's why I call him Blunted Talwar .

                            Comment


                              #15
                              dont compare yahya to muharuff. musharuff is not a cruel man and he is from indian muslim family and understands the problem faced
                              all muslims of south asia.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X