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    Indian Expert "Yes Pak. Has Tactical Nukes"...

    "Yes, Pakistan Has Tactical Nukes"
    ====================================
    Sou "Yes, Pakistan Has Tactical Nukes"

    Source: Outlook India

    Comment : http://www.outlookindia.com/full.asp...+%28F%29&sid=3

    Gen D.B. Shekatkar (retd) on Pakistan's TNWs and the options before us. Lt Gen D.B. Shekatkar, former additional director-general, military operations, and additional director-general, perspective planning (covering among other things nuclear doctrine and planning), retired from the army on March 31 this year. In addition to the two postings, he has also been a divisional commander in Kashmir, a corps commander in the northeast and commandant of the prestigious Infantry School. Excerpts from an interview to Outlook: The army top brass is worried about Pakistan threatening to use a nuclear weapon and say this should not be treated casually. What is your perception? I agree that the repeated assertions by the Pakistanis on this count should not be taken lightly. Does Pakistan possess a tactical nuclear weapon? Yes, it does and we should be ready to counter it. Is Pakistan capable of using a tactical nuclear weapon? Yes, it is. In the army, when we deal with the nuclear aspect and future planning, we have always taken the tactical nuclear weapon factor into account when dealing with Pakistan. There is this theory among various nuclear analysts that Pakistan does not possess the technology to miniaturise a nuclear weapon, leave alone having a weapons delivery system... With due respect, there is vast difference between academic research and ground realities. The series of missiles supplied to Pakistan by China and North Korea are capable of carrying a tactical nuclear weapon. China also has the technology to miniaturise. Lt Gen D.B. Shekatkar (retd) on Pakistan's TNWs and the options before us. Lt Gen D.B. Shekatkar, former additional director-general, military operations, and additional director-general, perspective planning (covering among other things nuclear doctrine and planning), retired from the army on March 31 this year. In addition to the two postings, he has also been a divisional commander in Kashmir, a corps commander in the northeast and commandant of the prestigious Infantry School. Excerpts from an interview to Outlook: The army top brass is worried about Pakistan threatening to use a nuclear weapon and say this should not be treated casually. What is your perception? I agree that the repeated assertions by the Pakistanis on this count should not be taken lightly. Does Pakistan possess a tactical nuclear weapon? Yes, it does and we should be ready to counter it. Is Pakistan capable of using a tactical nuclear weapon? Yes, it is. In the army, when we deal with the nuclear aspect and future planning, we have always taken the tactical nuclear weapon factor into account when dealing with Pakistan. There is this theory among various nuclear analysts that Pakistan does not possess the technology to miniaturise a nuclear weapon, leave alone having a weapons delivery system... With due respect, there is vast difference between academic research and ground realities. The series of missiles supplied to Pakistan by China and North Korea are capable of carrying a tactical nuclear weapon. China also has the technology to miniaturise.

















    Pms of U


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    "One of the characteristics of healthy cultures is that they can poke fun at themselves."

    #2
    http://www.outlookindia.com/full.asp...+%28F%29&sid=2

    Just What Is A TNW?
    DAVINDER KUMAR


    The term tactical nuclear weapon (TNW) is used to describe smaller versions of nuclear weapons with relatively low destructive capabilities and an impact radius confined to a limited area as against conventional nuclear warheads which can wipe out an entire city.
    Lower-yield versions or miniaturised nuclear weapons can be used to inflict damage on strategic military deployments of the enemy. Hence, TNWs are often referred to as battlefield nuclear weapons or baby nukes. Since the damage is localised or confined to a certain area, the danger of impacting on the civilian population is greatly reduced as compared to a strategic nuclear weapon of the Hiroshima kind.

    The TNWs include a broad range of atomic explosive devices like nuclear artillery shells, nuclear landmines and nuclear warheads which can be air-dropped from planes, launched on missiles or fired from artillery guns. The yield of these warheads, measured in terms of kiloton (kt), varies from 0.1 kt to 10-15 kt. A nuclear explosion of a 5-kt yield is estimated to spread total destruction in a little over a one-mile radius.

    But nuclear experts warn that though of lower yield, TNWs can be easily misused. Since they are small in size and can be easily transported and stored, they're also susceptible to non-judicious use and even theft by terrorist networks. Not surprisingly, the US administration had panicked at the possibility of Pakistan's nuclear warheads being stolen by Al Qaeda terrorists during the Afghanistan strikes.

    Many defence experts hold the view that in the hands of a military regime (like Pakistan), TNWs are far more vulnerable to accidental or unauthorised use than conventional nuclear weapons. Given the fact that they can be deployed on the frontline, they could be fired by commanders in a crisis situation without observing the stringent safety precautions that otherwise govern the launch of strategic nuclear weapons. Furthermore, any misuse of TNWs in civilian areas could potentially lead to a broader nuclear exchange.

    So far, only the US and Russia are known to possess TNWs. The US is believed to have about 2,000 of them, of which around 1,700 are supposedly deployed on the mainland and the rest across bases in Europe. The Russians, on the other hand, are suspected to have about 15,000 TNWs including the ones that are deployed, stored or are in the process of being decommissioned. However, the third most prominent player is China, which is suspected to have about 120 TNWs. It is from this stock that some warheads are believed to have been delivered to Pakistan. India does possess strategic nuclear missiles but does not have TNWs.

    This perhaps explains Islamabad's nuclear rhetoric. Pakistan is suspected to have 20-30 nuclear warheads but it is not known how many TNWs it has managed to obtain. Significantly, in the past, Pakistani officials have often reiterated that TNWs are part of their nuclear deterrence policy.

    Acknowledged international security experts like Eric Arnett have observed that should Pakistan exercise its nuclear option, it might target Indian tank divisions in the Rajasthan desert or iaf bases. These attacks might be perceived as striking at the military since relatively few civilians are likely to be killed.

    "Unlike India, the nuclear command and control in Pakistan is in the hands of a few generals. Hence the danger of a strike is more. We have to factor this in while planning our strategy, and not by believing they won't strike," says defence analyst Maj Gen (retd) Afsir Karim.


    Comment


      #3
      undoubtedly india has been caught unexpectedly withnuclear bomb inits posession & it cant find reason enough to explain what it wants to use it for .


      SUMMER GAMES WITH NUCLEAR BALLS
      *************************************

      http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/i...ckline.gif>
      TUESDAY, JUmesofindia.indiatimes.com/images/spacer.gif
      ChannelNE 04, 2002
      THE TIMES OF INDIA

      ARUNDHATI ROY


      Foreign Correspondents arrive in Delhi in droves. Many call me. ?Why haven?t you left the city?? they ask. ?Isn?t nuclear war a real possibility? Isn?t Delhi a prime target?

      If nuclear weapons exist, then nuclear war is a real possibility. And Delhi is a prime target. It is. But where shall we go? Is it possible to go out and buy another life because this one?s not panning out? If I go away, and everything and everyone ? every friend, every tree, every home, every dog, squirrel and bird that I have known and loved ? is incinerated, how shall I live on? Who shall I love?

      And who will love me back? Which society will welcome me and allow me to be the hooligan that I am here, at home? So we?re all staying. We huddle together. We realise how much we love each other. And we think, what a shame it would be to die now. Life?s normal only because the macabre has become normal.

      While we wait for rain, for football, for justice, the old generals and eager boy-anchors on TV talk of first strike and second-strike capabilities as though they?re discussing a family board game.

      My friends and I discuss Prophecy, the documentary about the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The fireball. The dead bodies choking the river. The singed, bald children, still alive, their clothes burned into their bodies. The cancers, implanted genetically, a malignant letter to the unborn. We remember especially the man who just melted into the steps of a building. We imagine ourselves like that.

      As stains on staircases. I imagine future generations of hushed schoolchildren pointing at my stain...that was a writer. Not She or He. That.

      I?m sorry if my thoughts are stray and disconnected, not always worthy. Often ridiculous. My husband?s writing a book on trees. He has a section on how figs are pollinated. Each fig only by its own specialised fig wasp.

      There are nearly a thousand different species of fig wasps, each a precise, exquisite, synchrony, the product of millions of years of evolution. All the fig wasps will be nuked. Zzzz. Ash. And my husband. And his book.

      A dear friend, who?s an activist in the Narmada Bachao Andolan, is on indefinite hunger strike protesting the forced eviction of villagers to make way for the Man Dam. Today is the fourteenth day of her fast.

      What an act of faith and hope! How brave it is to believe that in today?s world, non-violent protest will register, will matter. Will it? To governments that are comfortable with the notion of a wasted world, what?s a wasted valley?

      The threshold of horror has been ratcheted up so high that nothing short of genocide or the prospect of nuclear war merits mention. Peaceful resistance is treated with contempt. Terrorism?s the real thing.

      The underlying principle of the War Against Terror, the very notion that war is an acceptable solution to terrorism, has ensured that terrorists in the subcontinent now have the power to trigger a nuclear war.

      Displacement, dispossession, starvation, poverty, disease ? these are now just the funnies, the comic-strip items. Our home minister says Amartya Sen has it all wrong ? the key to India?s development is not education and health but Defence (and don?t forget the kickbacks, O Best Beloved).

      Perhaps what he really meant was that war is the key to avert the world?s attention from fascism and genocide. To avoid dealing with any one single issue of real governance that urgently needs to be addressed. For the governments of India and Pakistan, Kashmir is not a problem, it?s their perennial and spectacularly successful solution. Kashmir is the rabbit they pull out of their hats every time they need one. It?s a radioactive rabbit now, and it?s careening out of control. No doubt there is Pakistan sponsored cross-border terrorism in Kashmir.

      But there are other kinds of terror in the Valley. There?s the inchoate nexus between jehadi militants, ex-militants, foreign mercenaries, local mercenaries, underworld Mafiosi, security forces, arms dealers and criminalised politicians and officials on both sides of the border. There?s also rigged elections, daily humiliations, ?disappearances? and staged ?encounters?.

      And now the cry has gone up in the heartland: India is a Hindu country. Muslims can be murdered under the benign gaze of the state. Mass murderers will not be brought to justice. Indeed, they will stand for elections. Is India to be a Hindu nation in the heartland and a secular one around the edges?

      Meanwhile the International Coalition Against Terror makes war and preaches restraint. Britain is busy arming both sides. Tony Blair?s ?peace? mission a few months ago was actually a business trip to discuss a one billion pound deal (and don?t forget the kickbacks, O Best Beloved) to sell Hawk fighter-bombers to India.

      ?Why isn?t there a peace movement?? western journalists ask me ingenuously. How can there be a peace movement when, for most people in India, peace means a daily battle: for food, for water, for shelter, for dignity? War, on the other hand, is something professional soldiers fight far away on the border.

      And nuclear war ? well, that?s completely outside the realm of most peoples? comprehension. The last question every visiting journalist always asks me is: Are you writing another book? This talk of nuclear war displays such contempt for music, art, literature and everything else that defines civilisation. So what kind of book should I write?

      It?s not just the one million soldiers on the border who are living on hair-trigger alert. It?s all of us. That?s what nuclear bombs do. Whether they?re used or not, they violate everything that is humane. They alter the meaning of life itself.

      Why do we tolerate them? Why do we tolerate the men who use nuclear weapons to blackmail the entire human race?


      ------------------
      "Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards." -- Unknown

      [This message has been edited by Azad Munna (edited June 03, 2002).]

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