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Mush on NYTIMES 5/5/02

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    Mush on NYTIMES 5/5/02

    Remember NYtimes requires a cookie on your machine to work. Glass of milk is optional.
    I like what Mush had to say. We really should give him a chance!

    http://www.nytimes.com/2002/05/05/in...ia/05MUSH.html

    May 5, 2002

    Musharraf Says Vote Was Necessary to Bring Democracy
    By RAYMOND BONNER



    Reuters
    Gen. Pervez Musharraf in a television address to the nation.






    Topics
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    Pakistan

    Musharraf, Pervez



    SLAMABAD, Pakistan, May 4 — Clearly stung by international criticism of the referendum this week that gave him five more years in power, Pakistan's leader, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, invited foreign correspondents to his presidential palace today to explain and defend his actions.

    The referendum last Tuesday was a necessary, and critical, first step in bringing true democracy to Pakistan, which in 50 years of independence has not seen a single government complete its term in office and hand over power peacefully, General Musharraf said.

    "We want democracy to come to Pakistan," said General Musharraf, who seized power in a bloodless coup in October 1999. "We want sustainable democracy that takes root. I mean every word of it."

    Parliamentary elections are scheduled for October, and by then, General Musharraf said, he will have put in place political changes that will ensure that the country does not return to the "confrontational politics" of the past, the politics of what he called "destabilization."

    During a session with a dozen foreign reporters that lasted nearly two hours, General Musharraf said that the only Americans who had crossed into Pakistan from Afghanistan in pursuit of fleeing fighters from Al Qaeda or the Taliban have been a few communications experts.

    Al Qaeda and Taliban forces have long been suspected of using Pakistan as a sanctuary and, this week, British and American troops in Afghanistan launched one of the largest operations of the war against Al Qaeda and the Taliban, in areas along the border with Pakistan.

    General Musharraf said today that he did not believe that large numbers of Al Qaeda fighters had crossed into the sparsely populated mountainous areas on the Pakistan side of the border, though he said there might be small groups of 4 to 10 individuals.

    The Pakistani Army has been patrolling the border since December, or trying to. But it is a difficult task, as General Musharraf acknowledged today.

    "Nobody can seal the border," he said. "It is humanly impossible."

    Nevertheless, no American, or other foreign, combat troops will be allowed to cross into Pakistan. The border region is populated by various Pakistani tribes over which the central Pakistani government has little authority, he said, because this would create serious political problems. "They don't even allow Pakistani troops to enter there," General Musharraf said. "This is the first time in a hundred years that we have entered there."

    Today, a tribal leader in Miram Shah, which is less than five miles from the border, said there had been reports of American troops inside Pakistan, but he could not confirm them, and he had not seen any.

    "We can hear the voices of the planes, but not the voices of the guns," the leader, Ajmal Khan, said in a telephone interview. "It is very tense."

    General Musharraf appeared relaxed during today's session, seeming to enjoy the exchange even with reporters whose papers have been harshly critical of the referendum.

    While there have been allegations of ballot stuffing and of people voting more than once, the most serious challenges to the the legitimacy of the referendum have been on the official process itself. There was only one name on the ballot: General Musharraf's, with a yes or no vote. Political parties were not allowed to hold rallies calling for a "no" vote or for a boycott, and the government deployed all of its considerable resources — from money for a huge advertising campaign to transportation on Election Day — to produce a large turnout and a "yes" vote.

    The outcome was never in doubt. The government says there was a 50 percent turnout, which is hard to verify or dispute, and that 98 percent voted "yes" for General Musharraf.

    In some ways, what happened on voting day is now moot. Few, besides General Musharraf and his backers, see it as a true endorsement of the leader.

    Only one world leader, President Jiang Zemin of China, has congratulated General Musharraf on his "victory," an aide to the Pakistani leader said today.

    The Bush administration has deftly avoided a public judgment on the referendum. Instead, it has said it is looking forward to the October elections to advance democracy in Pakistan.

    Many political analysts and foreign diplomats here are puzzled why General Musharraf even called the referendum. He is genuinely popular, in large measure because he is seen as not using his office for personal financial gain, or allowing his ministers to do so, which sets him significantly apart from the two civilian governments that preceded him.

    If anything, the referendum has tarnished his image, raising suggestions that he intends to follow the route of Gen. Zia al-Haq, who seized power in a coup in 1977, then used a referendum in 1984 to become president.

    General Musharraf insisted today that he was not General Zia, that these were different times, and he was a different personality.

    "Am I trying to usurp power, or am I trying to bring democracy to Pakistan, that is the question," General Musharraf said today. "You have to believe me, and take me on my word, I want to bring democracy."

    A veteran Western diplomat here said that with the referendum, General Musharraf had opened the campaign for the elections in October, elections that will determine not only the country's future, but General Musharraf's fate. "The real game begins now," the diplomat said.

    He will need a two-thirds majority of the new Parliament to approve any constitutional amendments he wants as part of his political changes, such as giving women 17 percent of the seats, and setting up a national security council of military officers and civilians that will have oversight of the Parliament and the executive branch.

    He also needs two-thirds of the Parliament to grant him immunity from prosecution for the 1999 coup. Otherwise he could be subjected to a treason trial.

    "It's going to be a dirty game, between now and October," the diplomat said.

    After October, General Musharraf will be president and chief of staff of the armed forces. "I am going to relax and play tennis and golf," he said.

    The prime minister, elected by the Parliament, will have the power to run the country, he said, "but I will not allow him to run it badly."


    [This message has been edited by OldLahori (edited May 04, 2002).]

    #2
    I think he is sincere...

    Comment


      #3
      We think you are insincere!

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by kumarakn:
        We think you are insincere!
        We don't care what you think! As for the CE, he is pres. We have to deal with it. I have no clue why he went this way. He is a dictator, he should act like one.



        ------------------
        Im just a freedom fighter
        No remorse
        Raging on in holy war
        Soon therell come a day
        When youre face to face with me
        You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

        Comment


          #5
          Who is Musarraf suppose to be....our God father.We are all fedup from these Kahakis.

          Comment


            #6
            The CE has done a good job. Thank Allah he is staying for 5 years. What exactly do you have against the CE?

            ------------------
            Im just a freedom fighter
            No remorse
            Raging on in holy war
            Soon therell come a day
            When youre face to face with me
            You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

            Comment


              #7
              The whole pakistani mentality is based on the Leige Lord scenario

              I will support you because my father supported your father.. and so on.. That is the biggest break we need to make in pakistan to establish true democracy.

              In pakistan.. when you vote.. what do you vote for..

              1. policies
              2. your representatives - their moral stature or their performance
              3. the prime minister candidate.

              I have rarely met anyone in pakistan who actually knows what the parties policies are.. or voting for their representatives.

              in similar fashion.. people voted for mushy .. he is the new leige lord.. for the time being.

              Comment


                #8
                I think Perveez Mushraaf's last statement of the interview says it all.

                >>The prime minister, elected by the Parliament, will have the power to run the country, he said, "but I will not allow him to run it badly." <<

                What kind of Prime Minister and Parliament would that be, who won't 'Allowed To Run It Badly' ?

                I mean if they are powerless anyway, why bother maintaining the parliament building and Members Of Parliaments?



                Now I see it!! Having given 'Sham' referendum to Pakis now it is the time for 'Sham' Parliament and MPS!!!


                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Andhra:
                  I think Perveez Mushraaf's last statement of the interview says it all.

                  >>The prime minister, elected by the Parliament, will have the power to run the country, he said, "but I will not allow him to run it badly." <<

                  What kind of Prime Minister and Parliament would that be, who won't 'Allowed To Run It Badly' ?

                  I mean if they are powerless anyway, why bother maintaining the parliament building and Members Of Parliaments?



                  Now I see it!! Having given 'Sham' referendum to Pakis now it is the time for 'Sham' Parliament and MPS!!!

                  Perhaps you still don't understand why he constituted the National security council...they are not responsible for runninng the day to day operations of the nation....they are there to check if the prime mininster is acting in Pak's favour or not...they are there for checking.....why do Indians have such a problem with him....he's not ruling India!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Bhadsha:
                    Perhaps you still don't understand why he constituted the National security council...they are not responsible for runninng the day to day operations of the nation....they are there to check if the prime mininster is acting in Pak's favour or not...they are there for checking.....why do Indians have such a problem with him....he's not ruling India!

                    Well Said Buddy

                    Play Your Game - Guess My Motto

                    Comment


                      #11
                      If Sharon beomces Chief of General in Pakistan Army, all Pakistanis find some way to support him as well.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Faraz Mir:
                        If Sharon beomces Chief of General in Pakistan Army, all Pakistanis find some way to support him as well.
                        What's your logic behind this, eh? Yo, don't compare Sharon with Mushy

                        Take Your Best Shot At Me

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Andhra:

                          What kind of Prime Minister and Parliament would that be, who won't 'Allowed To Run It Badly' ?

                          I mean if they are powerless anyway, why bother maintaining the parliament building and Members Of Parliaments?



                          powerless from ruining the country.. powerless from destroying the country.. powerless from damaging democracy..

                          I think we have these basic tenets established in the Democratic Nations of the developed world.. in the form of checks and balances.. and believe it or not .. on common sense.

                          I Pakistan.. due to permeated corruption.. you need an enforcer.. who can keep reins on the rulers to ensure that they don't damage the country.. or damage the foundations of democracy..

                          as I have posted on the board. every time there has been an elected parliament in Pakistan.. they have dissolved the local assemblies.. the basic foundation of democracy.. not an act of democrats..

                          If things like these will be prevented from happening.. I am all for it..

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Adnan Ahmed:
                            I think he is sincere...
                            as sincere as Bush is for the cause of islam

                            Comment

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