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Did Pakistani Police Torture Kidnap Suspect?

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    Did Pakistani Police Torture Kidnap Suspect?

    I just saw the videotape of the main suspect in the Pearl Kidnapping being led into court by Pakistani police/military. To my horror, he was completely hooded by a white cloth/blanket/hood.

    I must presume from the outrage expressed at the US military for putting black hoods on Al Qaeda members during similar transport that many of you believe the Pakistani military/police just engaged in torture. True?
    "I met the surgeon general - he offered me a cigarette. " --Rodney Dangerfield

    #2
    myvoice,

    Pakistani police don't have a great reputation to start with in Pakistan, there is no way we can say whether he has been tortured or not. Possibly so, it wouldn't surprise me at all.

    The important point here is, has Pakistan breached it's own laws in regard to treatment of it's own prisoner by said hooding?

    The outrage expressed wrt the Al Qaida 'suspects' was more European-led and that was directed against what they saw as USA attempts to wriggle around Geneva Conventions by heading for Guatenamo bay.

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      #3
      Originally posted by myvoice:
      I must presume from the outrage expressed at the US military for putting black hoods on Al Qaeda members during similar transport that many of you believe the Pakistani military/police just engaged in torture. True?
      Surely you can differentiate between the two scenarios, cant you?
      The Al-qaida members transported to Cuba were hooded, goggled, shackled and taped through the course of an 18 hour nonstop flight. The kidnap suspect in Pakistan was hooded on his trip from the police station to the court.

      Its likely that Shaikh Omar asked to be hooded in order to keep from having his picture published. We have seen similar scenarios in public arrests in the US as well, where arrestees cover their heads with their jackets, or anything available, in order to avoid exposure.

      That said, its not to say that Pakistani police doesnt use torture as a tactic. Police in Pakistan has a long way to go before they can start following a civilized code of conduct. Lack of training and education, and high number of pending cases are two of the primary reasons/motives for torture.

      Comment


        #4
        Judge:
        If hooding equals torture when the US does it to a terrorist, why is it not torture when Pakistan does it to a terrorist?

        I personally don't think hooding equals torture and don't believe that Pakistan or the US did anything wrong putting hoods on these guys heads when moving them. But, so many in GuppiLand jumped all over the hooding of Al Qaeda by the US and claimed it was torture. For those I ask, what's the difference?

        AKIF: Point to one source that said the Al Qaeda members were hooded for the whole flight from Afghanistan. You think they were fed and p**d while wearing hoods? They were hooded when they were moved to and from the plane.

        [This message has been edited by myvoice (edited February 14, 2002).]
        "I met the surgeon general - he offered me a cigarette. " --Rodney Dangerfield

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          #5
          myvoice..

          I wont comment on how nice or atrocious the conditions of the cuban captives are/were. My point was simply to highlight the fact that the two scenarios are not comparable.

          The cuban captives havent even been given their basic rights as yet. No charges filed, no lawyers allowed, no nothing. So a hood covered face takes a back seat really.

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            #6
            >> If hooding equals torture when the US does it to a terrorist, why is it not torture when Pakistan does it to a terrorist?


            US doesn't need to explain itself to Guppies - if it wants to flout it's own standards of decency it's nobody's loss but American's.

            I was not one of those jumping all over, i think US should do whatever it wants with it's captives. Just don't give us sanctimonious bull$hit about human rights in future.

            In the same way, I don't want to hear any sanctimonious bull$hit coming out of Pakistan either. Geneva Convention became a lame duck as soon as those prisoners were flown to Guatemano Bay.

            Comment


              #7
              The US handling of the prisoners in Cuba is not at all comparable with this scenario.

              Those people were prisoners of war, and nothing can be gained by torturing them; everyone knows they have no clue as to the whereabouts of their beloved leader.

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