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    Pakistan rejects terrorism in all its forms and manifestations

    Musharraf made a bold move with that statement today. Has he taken this new position because of pressure from the West, the threat from India or because it is the best policy for Pakistan? I have to believe it is the latter.

    Will the majority of Pakistanis (and the ISI) support him in this view? Or will it appear that he is abandoning the government's long standing support for Kashmiri 'freedom fighters'? I hope it is seen as the brave and calculative move that it is and not as kowtowing to others.

    Musharraf Says He Rejects Terrorism as Blair Tries to Heal Rift With India

    ISLAMABAD, Pakistan Pakistan's president declared Monday that his country rejects all forms of terrorism, for the first time making no attempt to exclude Islamic militants whose conflict with India over the disputed territory of Kashmir has brought the nations to the brink of war.

    The statement followed a meeting with British Prime Minister Tony Blair, whose visits to India and Pakistan over the past two days turned into an exercise in shuttle diplomacy aimed at defusing simmering tensions between the nuclear-armed rivals.

    "Pakistan rejects terrorism in all its forms and manifestations," President Gen. Pervez Musharraf said in a statement with Blair following their meeting.

    Musharraf departed from his customary practice of saying that Pakistan does not consider the Kashmiri fighters terrorists, just "freedom fighters," a distinction that Blair implied was untenable in the world climate after the Sept. 11 terror attacks in the United States.

    Pakistan has long backed militants opposed to India's rule over part of Kashmir, the Himalayan region claimed by both countries and divided between them. Kashmir has sparked two of the three wars the countries have fought since independence in 1947.

    India has been outraged by bloody attacks on the assembly of the Indian-ruled part of Kashmir on Oct. 1 and on the Indian Parliament on Dec. 13. Pakistan has denied India's charge that it was behind militant groups who allegedly staged the attacks. Since then, the two countries have deployed thousands of troops to their border, raising fears of a new war.

    "The president has given a very clear statement that he rejects terrorism in all its forms," Blair said. "It is important, therefore, that any groups sponsoring terrorism like the acts of the 1st of October and the 13th of December have no place and no support.

    "And I believe that that is the position of the president and I welcome that," Blair said.

    There was no immediate response to Musharraf's statement from New Delhi, where External Affairs Ministry spokeswoman Nirupama Rao did not answer calls placed to her office and mobile phones.

    Pakistani authorities have announced mass arrests of militants for the past two weeks, including the leaders and other members of two groups Lashkar-e-Tayyaba and Jaish-e-Mohammed which India accuses of the Dec. 13 assault on Parliament. Fourteen people were killed, including the five assailants, in the attack.

    Pakistani police said Sunday that security forces arrested 42 Muslim militants in eastern Punjab province, raising the number of detainees to 300.

    However, Musharraf, in an interview broadcast on Chinese Central Television, ruled out handing over 20 alleged terrorists that New Delhi wants extradited to India in connection with attacks on Indian territory. Islamabad has said that India has not provided enough evidence that the men were criminals.

    If there is evidence against the suspects, "we will deal with them according to the law of our own land," Musharraf said. "We are certainly not at all considering handing over anybody to anyone."

    On the border, meanwhile, hostilities continued Monday. Indian and Pakistani forces exchanged heavy artillery fire in Kashmir, and the Indian army claimed six Pakistani soldiers were killed. Other Indian officials said eight suspected militants and eight civilians were killed in separate incidents in the region.

    India said its military shot down a small, unmanned Pakistani aircraft that entered Indian air space Sunday over Kashmir. Pakistan denied the claim, saying an Indian aircraft crashed and India was trying to cover it up through "baseless propaganda."

    Indian Defense Minister George Fernandes on Monday ruled out reducing India's military buildup along the border.

    "The troops are on the front line and, no, we are not reducing the troops," Fernandes said in Bangalore. "But we are taking several diplomatic initiatives to explain our stand to the international community and expect some action from Pakistan."

    On Sunday, Blair met with Indian Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee, then spoke on the phone for 15 minutes with President Bush, a spokesman for Blair said.

    Bush and Blair agreed terrorism should be renounced and a settlement to the India-Pakistan crisis should be negotiated, the spokesman told reporters on condition of anonymity.

    Vajpayee and Musharraf twice shook hands during a weekend South Asian summit in Katmandu, Nepal, raising hopes they might prepared to negotiate a solution to their differences.

    India, however, has said Pakistan needs to do more, and Vajpayee said in a speech to a banquet attended by Blair that India was prepared to take military action.

    http://foxnews.com./story/0,2933,42340,00.html

    #2
    I dont think that whatever Musharraf is doing is on his behalf. He is being dictated by India and the west. After 11 September it took only a few hours for Pakistan to reverse their support for the taleban.

    Just a couple of days back, Musharraf was drawing a line between Freedom movements and Terrorism, and now he's rejecting terrorism in all its forms and manifestations. I guess, Musharraf has come to the conclusion that its best for Pakistan, to leave Kashmir aside and save the remaining Pakistan.
    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,42340,00.html

    ISLAMABAD, Pakistan Pakistan's president declared Monday that his country rejects all forms of terrorism, for the first time making no attempt to exclude Islamic militants whose conflict with India over the disputed territory of Kashmir has brought the nations to the brink of war.


    The statement followed a meeting with British Prime Minister Tony Blair, whose visits to India and Pakistan over the past two days turned into an exercise in shuttle diplomacy aimed at defusing simmering tensions between the nuclear-armed rivals.

    "Pakistan rejects terrorism in all its forms and manifestations," President Gen. Pervez Musharraf saidin a statement with Blair following their meeting.

    Musharraf departed from his customary practice of saying that Pakistan does not consider the Kashmiri fighters terrorists, just "freedom fighters," a distinction that Blair implied was untenable in the world climate after the Sept. 11 terror attacks in the United States.

    Pakistan has long backed militants opposed to India's rule over part of Kashmir, the Himalayan region claimed by both countries and divided between them. Kashmir has sparked two of the three wars the countries have fought since independence in 1947.

    India has been outraged by bloody attacks on the assembly of the Indian-ruled part of Kashmir on Oct. 1 and on the Indian Parliament on Dec. 13. Pakistan has denied India's charge that it was behind militant groups who allegedly staged the attacks. Since then, the two countries have deployed thousands of troops to their border, raising fears of a new war.

    "The president has given a very clear statement that he rejects terrorism in all its forms," Blair said. "It is important, therefore, that any groups sponsoring terrorism like the acts of the 1st of October and the 13th of December have no place and no support.

    "And I believe that that is the position of the president and I welcome that," Blair said.

    There was no immediate response to Musharraf's statement from New Delhi, where External Affairs Ministry spokeswoman Nirupama Rao did not answer calls placed to her office and mobile phones.

    Pakistani authorities have announced mass arrests of militants for the past two weeks, including the leaders and other members of two groups Lashkar-e-Tayyaba and Jaish-e-Mohammed which India accuses of the Dec. 13 assault on Parliament. Fourteen people were killed, including the five assailants, in the attack.

    Pakistani police said Sunday that security forces arrested 42 Muslim militants in eastern Punjab province, raising the number of detainees to 300.

    However, Musharraf, in an interview broadcast on Chinese Central Television, ruled out handing over 20 alleged terrorists that New Delhi wants extradited to India in connection with attacks on Indian territory. Islamabad has said that India has not provided enough evidence that the men were criminals.

    If there is evidence against the suspects, "we will deal with them according to the law of our own land," Musharraf said. "We are certainly not at all considering handing over anybody to anyone."

    On the border, meanwhile, hostilities continued Monday. Indian and Pakistani forces exchanged heavy artillery fire in Kashmir, and the Indian army claimed six Pakistani soldiers were killed. Other Indian officials said eight suspected militants and eight civilians were killed in separate incidents in the region.

    India said its military shot down a small, unmanned Pakistani aircraft that entered Indian air space Sunday over Kashmir. Pakistan denied the claim, saying an Indian aircraft crashed and India was trying to cover it up through "baseless propaganda."

    Indian Defense Minister George Fernandes on Monday ruled out reducing India's military buildup along the border.

    "The troops are on the front line and, no, we are not reducing the troops," Fernandes said in Bangalore. "But we are taking several diplomatic initiatives to explain our stand to the international community and expect some action from Pakistan."

    On Sunday, Blair met with Indian Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee, then spoke on the phone for 15 minutes with President Bush, a spokesman for Blair said.

    Bush and Blair agreed terrorism should be renounced and a settlement to the India-Pakistan crisis should be negotiated, the spokesman told reporters on condition of anonymity.

    Vajpayee and Musharraf twice shook hands during a weekend South Asian summit in Katmandu, Nepal, raising hopes they might prepared to negotiate a solution to their differences.

    India, however, has said Pakistan needs to do more, and Vajpayee said in a speech to a banquet attended by Blair that India was prepared to take military action.




    [This message has been edited by zaavia (edited January 08, 2002).]

    Comment


      #3
      Not mentioning does not mean excluding.
      For gods sake don't read into this too much.
      Plus those rose tinted glasses don't help either.

      ------------------
      Ours is not to reason why;
      Ours is but to do and die
      You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

      Comment


        #4

        "...all its forms and manifestations "
        doesn't seem to leave much wiggle room for any exclusions.

        Perhaps he is choosing diplomacy and negotiations over the failed policy of terror attacks.

        Comment


          #5
          Actually, he's simply restating Pakistan's existing policy.

          Pakistan does not provide any kind of support to groups involved in terrorism, nor, as per Musharraf's statement, will it in future support any form of terror. For example, Pakistan has condemned the Indian Parliament attack and has offered to bring to justice anyone in Pakistan who was involved. However, no evidence has been submitted to the Pakistani authorities to suggest that the planners of the attack are in, or have ever been, in Pakistan.

          But Pakistan has always differentiated between terrorists, who carry out attacks on innocent civilians, and legitimate freedom fighters who are attempting to defeat an occupation. You can be guaranteed that Pakistan will continue to extend full moral and diplomatic support to Freedom Fighters in Occupied Kashmir, as it has for many years.

          Until any Pakistani administration expressly states that it rejects supporting freedom fighters, Pakistan-backed groups will continue to fight India in Kashmir.

          [This message has been edited by mAd_ScIeNtIsT (edited January 08, 2002).]
          Muslims are so good at dividing that they can divide the atom. If you see two Muslims, probably they belong to 3 parties.
          Al-Ghazali

          Comment


            #6
            Whoops....double post.

            [This message has been edited by mAd_ScIeNtIsT (edited January 08, 2002).]
            Muslims are so good at dividing that they can divide the atom. If you see two Muslims, probably they belong to 3 parties.
            Al-Ghazali

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by CM:
              Not mentioning does not mean excluding.
              For gods sake don't read into this too much.
              Plus those rose tinted glasses don't help either.

              Very true. A general one sentence quote has got the likes of Fox news all excited, when if they looked into deeper in to the Kashmir dispute then they would know that there are 700,000 Indian occuptaion troops there. They are the one's carrying out the mass terror against the Kashmiri people in the form of raping, assaulting, looting and murdering Kashmiri people. That's terrorism without a doubt, and which the Pakistani government condemns. Are the Indian government prepared to do the same?

              Comment


                #8
                Also what ze Americans don't understand is that the INDIAN GOVT has said 85% of the freedom fighters are home grown.

                ------------------
                Ours is not to reason why;
                Ours is but to do and die
                You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

                Comment


                  #9
                  well, earlier pak stand was that "pakistanbi pl go to kashmir with their own will. we can not stop them. but we do not provide logistics and amunitions to these pakistani ppl"

                  kashmiri militants (shabbir, moulah azhar, etc.) used to roma around pak with rallies and KK, and pak govt did nothing.

                  Now, they have backed away from this. In all the long press onf with Blair, Mush never resatated this policy. Looks like that it is 180 degrees shift in kashmir policy too



                  Comment


                    #10
                    Pakistan to defuse India tensions with new policy: US Senator- ISLAMABAD, Jan 08: Senior US Senator Joseph Lieberman today said he believed Pakistan's new plan to combat militancy will defuse the dangerous stand off with India when it is unveiled this week. After talks with President Pervez Musharraf, the former vice presidential candidate said he believed the blueprint to fight extremism will play a "critically important" role in ending the crisis. "He is reaching for a speech to the Pakistani people... that will change the history of this country," said Lieberman

                    Comment


                      #11
                      rizvk,

                      the sorry point is that the army govt is giving an impression to the putisde world that the govt was and is not involved in kashmir. it is just the ppl of pakistan who r that screwed up.

                      easy escapegoat, huh?

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by rvikz:
                        "He is reaching for a speech to the Pakistani people... that will change the history of this country," said Lieberman
                        History can be changed? it can be doctored, it can be learnt from, it can be forgotten, steps could be taken to fix errors made in the past, but only the future can be changed.

                        I am sure thats what Lieberman meant, but


                        [This message has been edited by Fraudz (edited January 08, 2002).]
                        The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing the world he did not exist. And like that... he is gone.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          i have read a variety of responses here. It does not seem like the idea of "terrorism" is well defined.

                          Freedom fighters for some, are terrorists for others. I believe anyone who harms civilians and disrupts public property is a terrorist, regardless of his reasons/causes.

                          Also someone said Pakistan does not have any terrorist (by the above def) organizations operating from her soil.

                          1) Is Lashkar-e-Taiba a terrorist organization ?

                          2) Does it not have an office in Karachi ?

                          At least one of the above must be false shouldnt it ?

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Fraudz:
                            History can be changed? it can be doctored, it can be learnt from, it can be forgotten, steps could be taken to fix errors made in the past, but only the future can be changed.

                            I am sure thats what Lieberman meant, but


                            [This message has been edited by Fraudz (edited January 08, 2002).]

                            Depends if you want to change your history and how proud you are of it. Maybe musharraf wants to do exactly that.

                            Comment

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