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Betrayel of Pakistan has Backfired

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    #16
    Originally posted by Akif:
    I dont know whats so worrying about it for Pakistan.
    Akif, Pakistan now have to defend two sides from its enemies. Afghanistan was the only country that didn't voted for Pakistan's membership in UN. Afghanistan has always been hostle to Pakistan, except under Talibaan rule.

    There are two reason why we should be concern about:

    A) Afghans have never accepted Durand Line(spelling?). Ex-king of Afghanistan, during his time back in '60s he gave us lots of problems, by rising the question of 'Pashtunistan', and it should surprise anybody if he does it again.

    B) Afghanistan now is major foothold for India, and against our interests in Centeral Asian Republics, or CAR.

    We should be ready to take all necessary action, even if it means by force to protect out national, as well as out regional interests.

    Regards,

    Shamraz

    All people are equal, but some are more equal than others. We call these "corporations."

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      #17
      Shamraz, with Northern Alliance in power I dont see any dangers to Pakistan's security. As the Northern Alliance, is mainly composed of ethnic Tajiks, Uzbeks and Hazaras, while they have almost negligible pashtuns. Therefore I dont see them succeeding in raising the Pashtunistan problem, because I dont see the Pakistani pashtuns supporting the Tajiks, and Uzbeks, in power in Afghanistan.

      While, with the taleban out of power from Afghanistan finally, Pakistan should try to establish better relations with Northern Alliance as they will play an important role in the next government, and they should avoid sending their troops to Afghanistan as the part of the UN mission. Its high time that we realized our past mistakes and stop interfering in Afghanistan's affairs, and try to establish cordial relations with any government that comes in power in Afghanistan.

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        #18
        Originally posted by zaavia:
        Shamraz, with Northern Alliance in power I dont see any dangers to Pakistan's security. As the Northern Alliance, is mainly composed of ethnic Tajiks, Uzbeks and Hazaras, while they have almost negligible pashtuns. Therefore I dont see them succeeding in raising the Pashtunistan problem, because I dont see the Pakistani pashtuns supporting the Tajiks, and Uzbeks, in power in Afghanistan.

        While, with the taleban out of power from Afghanistan finally, Pakistan should try to establish better relations with Northern Alliance as they will play an important role in the next government, and they should avoid sending their troops to Afghanistan as the part of the UN mission. Its high time that we realized our past mistakes and stop interfering in Afghanistan's affairs, and try to establish cordial relations with any government that comes in power in Afghanistan.
        zaavia, I agree NA are in no position to pose any kind of threat to us, however, its now foothold for our enemies. Namely India. Tell me India with thousands miles away from border with Afghanistan, why have been so interested in Afghanistan? Its well know fact that Indian RAW have been providing support to NA walas. Here is very interesting article, and what it means for us.

        Regards

        Shamraz


        atimes.com/ind-pak/CK15Dh03.html

        Pakistan boxed into Taliban corner
        By Syed Saleem Shahzad

        KARACHI - With the Taliban's sudden withdrawal from key areas in Afghanistan to concentrate in the eastern provinces for a prolonged guerrilla war, and with the likelihood of an anti-Pakistan government running Afghanistan, Islamabad could be forced into lending covert support to the Taliban, whom it ditched two months ago in favor of the United States in its war on terrorism.

        The quick retreats of the Taliban from Mazar-e-Sharif and the dramatic withdrawals from the capital Kabul and Jalalabad have exploded like a bombshell among Pakistani military decision makers at general headquarters in Rawalpindi and at the Foreign Office in Islamabad.

        The developments are in stark contrast to what the Pakistani intelligence services had reported to President General Pervez Musharraf - that the war would drag on much longer and that Pakistan would maintain a strong bargaining position with the US and its allies over the composition of a new Afghan government.

        All this has changed with the US's inability - or reluctance - to stop the Northern Alliance from taking over Kabul, where it is already reported that on Wednesday former Afghan president Burhanuddin Rabbani will return to pronounce himself the head of the territories now under the control of the anti-Taliban opposition. Deposed by the Taliban in 1996, the ethnic Tajik Rabbani is the political leader of the Northern Alliance and is still recognized as Afghanistan's president by the United Nations and most countries.

        Although the United Nations is trying its best to install a broad-based government in Afghanistan, Rabbani has already made a move to set up an interim administration. It is said that General Mohammad Fahim will act as minister of defense, Abdullah Abdullah as minister of foreign affairs and Yunus Qanooni as minister of the interior. Warlords such as Rashid Dostum and Ismail Khan are expected to be left in control of the areas they have captured, Mazar-e-Sharif and Herat respectively.

        This pretty much leaves Pakistan out in the cold as this power configuration is made up mainly of three different ethnic groups: Tajiks, who comprise some 25 percent of the population; Hazaras, about 19 percent; and Uzbeks, with about 6 percent. Pashtuns, with 40 percent of the population, dominate central and southern Afghanistan, the home base to the leadership of the Taliban and Al-Qaeda, the network of Osama bin Laden.

        Rabbani has said that he would welcome former monarch Zahir Shah, but as a "private citizen". Yet Rabbani was the founding father of the Afghan resistance movement, which began in the days of Zahir Shah. Rabbani is well documented as saying that Zahir Shah would be hanged for war crimes if he ever returned to Afghanistan, and he has never softened this stance.

        In this perspective, it appears that Afghanistan will continue with its centuries-old traditions under which there will be no participation in government on the basis of anything but "might is right" and that the only way in which Pakistan can have any sway in balancing unfriendly forces across its border is to lend support to the Taliban to help keep a guerrilla war going.

        Sources say that on the news of the fall of Kabul an emergency meeting was convened in Rawalpindi, headed by General Yusuf, the vice chief of army staff - Musharraf is currently on a visit to the US. At the meeting it was emphasized that a new strategic policy for Afghanistan is needed.

        Well-placed sources suggest that in the new scheme of things the Pakistani tribal belt bordering Afghanistan, home of 10 million mostly Pashtun people, will play an important role: the Taliban will continue to fight their guerrilla war, with backup and supplies being ferried from Pakistan through the tribal areas to them.

        Meanwhile, Asia Times Online has canvassed the views of some prominent Pakistanis across a wide spectrum of interests, and they all believe that Pakistan has lost ground in the region.

        Former ambassador Hussain Haqqani said that Pakistan's single-track Afghan policy was now in tatters. He said Pakistan had not even contemplating what might happen should Kabul fall into the hands of a group other than the one it favored. Now all of the options that Pakistan would want to see happen, including the Zahir Shah (former king) one, are at the mercy of the Northern Alliance and its backers in Washington and London.

        Now Pakistan, says Hussain Haqqani, will have to play a passive role as even though some of the former warlords will be blessed with Western intelligence and will have a role in the future setup of Afghanistan, the Northern Alliance will not be willing to accommodate them. This will lead to a situation in which the prospects of civil war cannot be ruled out.

        The former director-general of the Inter-Services Intelligence, retired lieutenant-general Hamid Gul, said that the US had deceived Pakistan and it had facilitated the Northern Alliance entry into Kabul despite Pakistan's strong opposition.

        "Professor Rabbani has had very strong support from Russia and he will retain government at all costs. It should be kept in mind that Rabbani has always been against Zahir Shah, he will not allow him into any broad-based government. Neither will he allow the Taliban to be a part of any government. This situation will lead to anarchy and civil war in Afghanistan."

        He termed the Taliban retreat from Mazar-e-Sharif and Kabul as strategic moves, and called losing Jalalabad a "gambit". "Now pro-Indian and pro-Russian Northern Alliance forces will enter into the Pashtun stronghold of Jalalabad, which borders Pakistan. Pakistan will be forced to play a role in extending support to a group, and in the present circumstances the Taliban would be the only choice."

        He said that Pakistan would again be made a scapegoat for US designs, and it would be asked to send its ground troops into the country under the umbrella of UN forces. "This would be a peacemaking operation rather than peacekeeping operation because otherwise there would be complete civil war in Afghanistan," he said. Pakistan should refuse to send its troops into Afghanistan, he added.

        He believed that the Taliban would make the eastern provinces their stronghold and continue to struggle against the US-sponsored war against terrorism in the region.

        Liaquat Baloch, the deputy leader of the Jamaat-i-Islami (JI), the premier fundamentalist party in Pakistan, said that the present situation was the result of Pakistan's misguided policies that had allowed a pro-Indian government to be installed on Pakistan's western borders [Kabul] at a time when Pakistan's armed forces were already engaged with its arch-rival on the eastern borders. He maintained that it was Pakistan's support for the US position that had enabled anti-Taliban forces to capture Kabul. He added that the US exploited Musharraf for its own designs in the region, and had dragged Afghanistan into a prolonged civil war.

        A former senator and leader of the Pakistan People's Party, Taj Haider, said that the possible victimization of the Taliban by Northern Alliance forces was the main cause for concern. "Though they [Taliban] consider me an infidel, [Taj Haider comes from a hardcore Marxist school of thought and hails from a Shia family] my heart is crying for them. What they have done may be wrong, but once they surrendered the world community should raise its voice for them for better treatment."

        He maintained that Pakistan had closed all doors to Northern Alliance forces, and even when their former army leader, Ahmad Shah Masood, was assassinated in September, Pakistan did not offer its condolences.


        All people are equal, but some are more equal than others. We call these "corporations."

        Comment


          #19
          Northern Alliance though ethnic minorities, they are all afghans since their culture is influenced by the pashtuns.Until recently, we in pakistan didnt care who is who, we all thoguht of them as afghans. Indeed they are more afghan than they are tajik, uzbek and hazara .
          The issue of pashtunistn is not dangerous since, since it wont materialize until pashtuns in pakistan themselves want it. Until kshmiris themselves stop fighting, India cant do anything.
          NA, will be pro India, they are a people who burn gruduges in their hearts...they can very well try to create fassad of pashtunistan by sending their secret service spies in to pakistan and doing propaganda to pashtuns that Pak betrayed their brothers etc...
          NA are known to be bigots and racists...

          But it aint over yet, unlike us the afghans arnt cowards....their is still fight left in them. They've always made history...they are a gift to the ummah.

          [This message has been edited by Sultan Toora (edited November 15, 2001).]

          [This message has been edited by Sultan Toora (edited November 15, 2001).]

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