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    Jinnah house in B'bay has nothing to do with Pak : Jinah's grandson

    Another twist to Musharraf's demand.
    Jinnah House has nothing to do with Pakistan: Nusli Wadia
    ANJALI CORDEIRO
    Mumbai, July 07, 10:44



    he locks on the huge iron gates are rusted and creepers climb wildly all over the garden. The huge white house at 2, Bhausaheb Marg, Malabar Hills, once called the Jinnah House, is now empty - inhabited only by the ghosts of another era. Passers by walk past unseeingly, but as the Musharraf- Vajpayee summit nears, controversy is set to rear its head over the mansion built by Pakistan's founder Mohammad Ali Jinnah.

    When Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf recently indicated that he plans to ask Prime Minister Vajpayee to hand over Jinnah's house to Pakistan for use as a consulate, it was bound to stir some strong emotions. But this time, the opposition has come from a rather unexpected quarter: Jinnah's grandson and Bombay Dyeing magnate Nusli Wadia, who says he is vehemently opposed to Mussharaf's demand.


    "I am dead against the idea of the house being turned into a Pakistani consulate."


    "I am dead against the idea of the house being turned into a Pakistani consulate. Jinnah House has absolutely nothing to do with Pakistan. It was my grandfather's personal residence and one that he loved very dearly. How does this involve Pakistan? My family and I believe that any rights to the house are ours alone", Wadia said, speaking exclusively to the TheNewspaperToday.

    Jinnah, according to his grandson, loved this particular home in Mumbai so dearly that he hoped to return there. "Even after the partition, he believed that he would be able to return some day. Nobody had contemplated this kind of a situation between India and Pakistan. After all, there wasn't a Kashmir as yet, the ascension of the states hadn't begun," Wadia says.






    Wadia tells the story of a man so attached to his home that he wrote to the then Prime Minister of India - Jawarharlal Nehru - asking that no harm be allowed to come to Jinnah house in Mumbai. Jinnah told Nehru that he was determined to return to his home some day and settle there. In the meantime, he begged, the house should not be demolished or sold. If at all, it was only to be leased to a consulate. In the political turmoil that followed, Jinnah never did come back and eventually the government of India leased out the house to the British Deputy High Commission.

    A few years later, Jinnah's only child and Nusli Wadia's mother Dina, appealed to the government asking that the rights to the house be given to her family. But the white bungalow in Malabar hills carried too much political baggage with it and Dina Wadia's request was turned down.

    "Jinnah never took compensation for his property since he hoped to return, so we believe that any rights to the house are ours. We are ready to give an undertaking to the government that we will not exploit the house for financial gain, or even pull it down. But since it is a decision that has political implications it is just put on hold," says an irate Wadia. At the moment, Jinnah House continues to languish in the indifferent care of the Indian Centre of Cultural Relations (ICCR) and is treated as government of India property.

    So, now the house lies empty, with only a watchman or two on the grounds. Even today, all these years later, it is easy to see why Jinnah loved it so much. The white building is sprawling, according to reports has a built up area of 1694 sq m. and a garden spread over 4358 sq m. Even the damp yellow patches on the walls and the overgrown greenery cannot dim the perfect symmetry of the home whose construction Jinnah supervised himself. Twice a week, officials from the ICCR pay a cursory visit, but that's about it. "We don't have any particular maintainance programme. It is just swept and cleaned occasionally," Pramod Rane, an ICCR official told TheNewspaperToday.

    A sad and demeaning fate for a home that has seen history in the making. Famous persons in Indian history, like Mahatma Gandhi, Pandit Nehru and Subhash Chandra Bose, have met here and the house was the arena for many important political meetings on the demand for a separate Pakistan. Directly opposite 'Varsha', the Bungalow of the Maharashtra Chief Minister, the house has lain empty for more than a decade after the British High Commission vacated it in the early eighties. It was emboiled in controversy even in 1977, when the Janata Party Government proposed to give it to Pakistan to set up a consulate. However, following a sharp public criticism, the plan was abandoned.

    When President Pervez Mussharraf told an Indian newspaper that the consulates could be reopened if India agreed to hand over Jinnah House to Pakistan, there were protests from local residents. Says Nandlal Raghuvansi, the chairman of a local housing complex, "We will protest against any move to make the building a Pakistani consulate. India and Pakistan can never be friends and if there is futhure conflict between the two countries, the people around the consulate would be the first to be affected".

    Yet, it is sad that a house with so much history must remain closed to the public, without a name-plate and only an ugly sign saying 'photography not permitted' on its gates. Says historian Sharda Dwivedi, "It is a heritage building and would be preserved much better if it were at least used for some purpose. No matter how much the politician would like to pretend that it does not exist, it is part of our heritage. Just as Jinnah is part of our history".
    http://www.thenewspapertoday.com/ind...?NEWS_ID=20136

    #2
    ZZ,
    Feel bad for Jinnah's Grand Son. Also feel bad for Musharaf too.I hope he won't cry over this........
    If this kind a small thing can cause a big political damage to Pakistan and India's relations,..Then I think both nations must forget meeting eachother and goto War..............LOL
    I love Reporter's sense of humor,....
    Well ZZ,....thanx for starting this discussion man,....Keep up the good work.
    °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`° ¤ø,¸°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤ ºÂ°`°º¤ø,¸,¸¸,ø¤º °`°º¤ø,¸,¸¸,ø¤º° ºÂ¤Ã¸



    A Faith that cannot survive collision with the truth is not worth many regrets.

    Comment


      #3
      The house belongs to the grandson of Jinnah nobody else. I sure it value would be crores. Pakistan Government has no right over it.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Rani:
        The house belongs to the grandson of Jinnah nobody else. I sure it value would be crores. Pakistan Government has no right over it.
        RANI,
        Who said it belongs to Pakistani Govt,...Over here value has nothing to do,..What counts here is the wish of his Grand Son.....he must not be forced by either country to make up his mind...BTW..Pakistan shouldn't even bother much to insist on this kind a issue.


        °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`° ¤ø,¸°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤ ºÂ°`°º¤ø,¸,¸¸,ø¤º °`°º¤ø,¸,¸¸,ø¤º° ºÂ¤Ã¸



        A Faith that cannot survive collision with the truth is not worth many regrets.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by TARIQ786USA:
          Originally posted by Rani:
          The house belongs to the grandson of Jinnah nobody else. I sure it value would be crores. Pakistan Government has no right over it.
          RANI,
          Who said it belongs to Pakistani Govt,...Over here value has nothing to do,..What counts here is the wish of his Grand Son.....he must not be forced by either country to make up his mind...BTW..Pakistan shouldn't even bother much to insist on this kind a issue.


          Consulate of any country belongs to the country, Similarly Pakistani consult will belong to Pakistan Government.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Rani:
            Consulate of any country belongs to the country, Similarly Pakistani consult will belong to Pakistan Government.

            RANI,
            AGREED,...do you know,It depends upon the Host country like India which place or building to give to Pakistan,....for consulate/Embassy purposes,.....
            Once embassy or consulate is set up with the consent of both countries,..then it belongs to the respective country.......
            I actually,...side with his grand son,...he is 100% justified to use his veto power over this issue,...whithout any force or pressure.Not just for the sake of Publicity for couple of weeks,...some people play with those kind cheap shots,..to get 15 minute fame,.....on TV and in press.
            Also,...Pakistan must not give too much importance to this issue anyway....Just treat it like small issue,.....who cares about Jinnah house,....India/Pakistan have too many other issues to resolve than this useless thing.



            [This message has been edited by TARIQ786USA (edited July 07, 2001).]
            °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`° ¤ø,¸°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤ ºÂ°`°º¤ø,¸,¸¸,ø¤º °`°º¤ø,¸,¸¸,ø¤º° ºÂ¤Ã¸



            A Faith that cannot survive collision with the truth is not worth many regrets.

            Comment


              #7
              International norms have different aspects to this issue.
              It actually has to do with the ownership of the land as well as the building.
              from the article - read again for those who missed it - the place was leased to the British.
              IE the govt owns it.
              Thus it is legally theirs.
              Then his daughter appealed but it was denied.
              Thus again it is shown that the govt has control of the land and building and can do what they wish.
              Thus they can give it to pakistan without any legal problems.

              Now the claim of the grandson - i am sure that in int'l law compensation has a time limit, unless you are jewish then you can be compensated for the holocaust whenever you wish.
              The compensatory period depends on regional and domestic law.
              To my knowledge there is no international limit.
              Thus it will depend on indian law where the place could be handed over, or if there will be compensated.
              Now that it is in decay, why isn't the place handed over?

              Rani said:
              I sure it value would be crores


              Just what the grandson is thinking.
              It is quick money - heck he could sell to the pak govt and make millions.
              From the description of the place it would take billions to restore it to its original splendor.

              ------------------
              Our's not to reason why,
              Our's but to do and die:
              You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

              Comment


                #8
                well that bunglow is worth a fortune
                its located in malabar hill which is one of the poshest area in bombay and india.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by kabir:
                  well that bunglow is worth a fortune
                  its located in malabar hill which is one of the poshest area in bombay and india.
                  Kabir,
                  I agree with you,...Though it worth a Fortune,..but we must not over emphasis and give too much importance,..Pakistan must not Highlight it at all,..If Pakistan seems too much concerned about that,...then why they got independance.
                  Jinnah himself died long time ago ,..now,..his gradson,....who got just 15 minute fame ,..in this kind a situation,..
                  No one even knew the name of Jinnah's Grand Son,...He must be thankful to Indian press,..who are giving him too much coverage,........
                  If you check my thread,..about SIKHS,.,.."Vajpayee urged to take up Nankana Sahib issue with Musharraf"
                  you will be surprised,..How much we both countries have in common about places important to eachother.....


                  °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`° ¤ø,¸°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤ ºÂ°`°º¤ø,¸,¸¸,ø¤º °`°º¤ø,¸,¸¸,ø¤º° ºÂ¤Ã¸



                  A Faith that cannot survive collision with the truth is not worth many regrets.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by TARIQ786USA:

                    No one even knew the name of Jinnah's Grand Son,...
                    people know Nusli Wadia. He is a rich industrialist and is well known. They may not know that he is Jinnah's grandson.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by ZZ:
                      people know Nusli Wadia. He is a rich industrialist and is well known. They may not know that he is Jinnah's grandson.
                      So,..who cares,...In Pakistan we don't care about GrandSons etc,..If he is a Rich industrialist good for him,..I wish him all the best,......

                      °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`° ¤ø,¸°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤ ºÂ°`°º¤ø,¸,¸¸,ø¤º °`°º¤ø,¸,¸¸,ø¤º° ºÂ¤Ã¸



                      A Faith that cannot survive collision with the truth is not worth many regrets.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Rani:
                        Consulate of any country belongs to the country, Similarly Pakistani consult will belong to Pakistan Government.

                        rani so.. the land then belongs to the British.. as they had their consulate/ high Commission there..

                        the land's ownership always rests with the owner of the properry.. the lease holders which in this case would be governments have rights.. (unless they buy the land from the owners) .. and as long as they are resident on the land the land is considered to be part of the other country.. but only as long as they are resident.

                        The American Embassy in London is housed on land in private ownership.. The US government asked the British government whether they could purchase the land..

                        the land owner declined... for a very simple reason.. at the time of American Independence the government seized the land in the ownership of their family..

                        the condition the owners set was that I will sell you the land if you return our land to us.. hehehehehhe

                        so the american embassy does not own the land on which it is built.

                        ---------
                        on the topic of the grandson's rights.. if the land by indian law belongs to the government.. he has no rights..

                        as for compensation being paid.. my grandparent never got any compensation for the land which was seized from them.. so by the same figure they should go back to their land and claim it as they never got any compensation for it..

                        [This message has been edited by blackzero (edited July 08, 2001).]

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Jinnah's grandson Nusli Wadia (son of Dina Wadia) is very famous industrialist who Mr Nusli Neville Wadia is the chairman of following companies.

                          Company Director

                          Chairman
                          The Bombay Dyeing & Manufacturing Co. Ltd.
                          Gherzi Eastern Ltd.
                          The Bombay Burmah Trading Corpn. Ltd.
                          B R T Ltd.
                          N W Exports Ltd.
                          Britannia Industries Ltd.
                          Leila Lands Sdn. Bhd. (Malaysia)
                          National Peroxide Ltd.
                          Citurgia Biochemicals Ltd.
                          Wadia BSN India Ltd.
                          http://www.indiatimes.com/people/han...n/00100m56.htm


                          Wadias

                          The Wadias' first venture, over 250 years ago, was in the area of ship building - more than 355 ships were designed and built by the Wadias, including men-of-war for the British Navy. It was on one such ship that the American National Anthem was composed.

                          L-R: Neville Wadia, and son Nusli Wadia - the only grandson of Mohammad Ali Jinnah

                          With the wave of industrialization in the 19th century, trading grew, and with it, opportunities for new areas of business. In 1879, Bombay was next only to New Orleans as the world's largest cotton port. It was at this time that Nowrosjee Wadia, the second generation Wadia, set his sights on India's mushrooming textile industry. On August 23rd, in a humble redbrick shed, he began a small operation. Here, cotton yarn spun in India was dip dyed by hand in three colors-turkey red, green and orange-and laid out in the sun to dry. The Bombay Dyeing & Manufacturing Co. Ltd. had been born. A modest beginning for a company that was to grow in the following 115 yr. into one of India's largest producer of textiles. Along the path of growth and diversification, Bombay Dyeing has spawned dozens of other companies. In technical and financial collaboration with world leaders, such companies have pioneered the manufacture of various chemicals and have grown to be leaders in their new fields.

                          Neville Wadia, the third generation of the existing business family of the Wadias, was born in Liverpool on 22nd August 1911. He was educated at Malvern College and University of Cambridge. He started his career in 1931 as an apprentice with the Bombay Dyeing and Manufacturing Company Ltd., owned by his father Mr. Nowrosjee Wadia.

                          The arduous apprenticeship was an essential part of his grooming. In 1933 he was appointed the Director of the company. After his father's death in 1952, Mr. Neville Wadia took over as the chairman of the company. He married Dina Jinnah, the daughter of Mohammad Ali Jinnah, the Founder of Pakistan. During his quarter century as the Chairman, the company turnover increased eleven fold. At the age of 66, after spending forty eight years with Bombay Dyeing, he handed over the rein of control to his son, Mr. Nusli Wadia. It was the result of his toil that from a humble beginning Bombay Dyeing has risen to the status of one of the most respected and widely diversified business houses - The Wadia Group.


                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by mohabbat:
                            Jinnah's grandson Nusli Wadia (son of Dina Wadia) is very famous industrialist who Mr Nusli Neville Wadia is the chairman of following companies.

                            Company Director

                            Chairman
                            The Bombay Dyeing & Manufacturing Co. Ltd.
                            Gherzi Eastern Ltd.
                            The Bombay Burmah Trading Corpn. Ltd.
                            B R T Ltd.
                            N W Exports Ltd.
                            Britannia Industries Ltd.
                            Leila Lands Sdn. Bhd. (Malaysia)
                            National Peroxide Ltd.
                            Citurgia Biochemicals Ltd.
                            Wadia BSN India Ltd.
                            http://www.indiatimes.com/people/han...n/00100m56.htm


                            Wadias

                            The Wadias' first venture, over 250 years ago, was in the area of ship building - more than 355 ships were designed and built by the Wadias, including men-of-war for the British Navy. It was on one such ship that the American National Anthem was composed.

                            L-R: Neville Wadia, and son Nusli Wadia - the only grandson of Mohammad Ali Jinnah

                            With the wave of industrialization in the 19th century, trading grew, and with it, opportunities for new areas of business. In 1879, Bombay was next only to New Orleans as the world's largest cotton port. It was at this time that Nowrosjee Wadia, the second generation Wadia, set his sights on India's mushrooming textile industry. On August 23rd, in a humble redbrick shed, he began a small operation. Here, cotton yarn spun in India was dip dyed by hand in three colors-turkey red, green and orange-and laid out in the sun to dry. The Bombay Dyeing & Manufacturing Co. Ltd. had been born. A modest beginning for a company that was to grow in the following 115 yr. into one of India's largest producer of textiles. Along the path of growth and diversification, Bombay Dyeing has spawned dozens of other companies. In technical and financial collaboration with world leaders, such companies have pioneered the manufacture of various chemicals and have grown to be leaders in their new fields.

                            Neville Wadia, the third generation of the existing business family of the Wadias, was born in Liverpool on 22nd August 1911. He was educated at Malvern College and University of Cambridge. He started his career in 1931 as an apprentice with the Bombay Dyeing and Manufacturing Company Ltd., owned by his father Mr. Nowrosjee Wadia.

                            The arduous apprenticeship was an essential part of his grooming. In 1933 he was appointed the Director of the company. After his father's death in 1952, Mr. Neville Wadia took over as the chairman of the company. He married Dina Jinnah, the daughter of Mohammad Ali Jinnah, the Founder of Pakistan. During his quarter century as the Chairman, the company turnover increased eleven fold. At the age of 66, after spending forty eight years with Bombay Dyeing, he handed over the rein of control to his son, Mr. Nusli Wadia. It was the result of his toil that from a humble beginning Bombay Dyeing has risen to the status of one of the most respected and widely diversified business houses - The Wadia Group.

                            Thanx for bringing up this news,...Yaar if he is a Federal Reserve Chairman in USA,...who cares,....Wish him all the best,...What that has to do with Hot Issues,...here the survival of two countries is at stake,...This issue has nothing to do with anything,...Nuclear issue,..Kashmir issue,..and other economical cooperation are the one to be discussed,.....Who Cares about Jinnah house there,...


                            °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`° ¤ø,¸°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤ ºÂ°`°º¤ø,¸,¸¸,ø¤º °`°º¤ø,¸,¸¸,ø¤º° ºÂ¤Ã¸



                            A Faith that cannot survive collision with the truth is not worth many regrets.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by TARIQ786USA:
                              Thanx for bringing up this news,...Yaar if he is a Federal Reserve Chairman in USA,...who cares,....Wish him all the best,...What that has to do with Hot Issues,...here the survival of two countries is at stake,...This issue has nothing to do with anything,...Nuclear issue,..Kashmir issue,..and other economical cooperation are the one to be discussed,.....Who Cares about Jinnah house there,...
                              Obviously Mushy cares. Thats why he wants to ask India about turning it into a consulate.

                              Comment

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