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indian punjab vs pakistani punjab

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    indian punjab vs pakistani punjab

    Indian
    Punjab a quarter the size of Pakistani Punjab with much poorer soil
    and water resources is now producing more wheat (15m tonnes) than
    Pakistani Punjab

    #2
    ssooooooooo !
    look who is producing more cotton..

    oh yes, where is the link? please bring your proof and then I'll bring my statistic..
    There are only two forces in the world, the sword and the spirit. In the end the sword will always be conquered by the spirit. --Napoleon Bonaparte

    Comment


      #3
      Really dang, we have to do something about that.
      Oie malik send some of your ISI buddies dressed up like monkeys!!!
      That should scare them!!!
      And like pureland said rvikz, link, proof or article.
      And rediff is not a source.

      ------------------
      CROIRE A L'INCROYABLE

      I Came I Saw I ATE
      You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

      Comment


        #4
        Oie malik send some of your ISI buddies dressed up like monkeys!!!
        That should scare them!!!



        I am on to it now! The lions of Punjab will be roaring soon. Just don't blame me for the consequences...

        Comment


          #5
          Between hunger and surplus

          Mushtaq Ahmad

          Disregard to humanity reaches its climax when people die of starvation within or outside national borders while the world or state has many agrarian surpluses. Sadly, under the free commodity market, the number of people dying due to hunger is on the rise despite the increase in the number of countries producing cereal surpluses. Before 1980, there was continental food grain deficit and surplus; for instance, Argentina, Australia, Canada, France and USA exported wheat while Africa, Middle East, Western Europe, former USSR, China, India and Pakistan were the important importers of this vital food item. Between 1950 to 1990, food grain production increased by 3.5 per cent - above the growth of population, even then over 100 states continued to import wheat only from the USA. However, this number declined drastically as China, India and even Pakistan (to some extent) produced wheat beyond their domestic requirement.

          Did the boom in food grain production put an end to starvation or nutrient deficiency on the globe? Certainly, not! Then, who is to be blamed for it? When continental deficit and surplus existed, a deficient continent could blame the continents with surplus for showing callous trends toward human miseries. Now, such starvation and surplus seem imminent within national borders of numerous states. Who can blame whom - the affluent world, capitalist states, WTO, modern society, self-centred individuals, or even none but the hapless creatures' pre-ordained misfortunes, as ancient Romans told us? Whatever the case may be, there are many things evidently wrong with the multitudes of this planet. Presently, only the continent of Africa runs in shortage of cereal while all the countries in rest of the world have either sufficient grains and resources to feed their citizens or much more for export. The US pays its farmers not to grow more food while India and Pakistan find no places whatsoever in the godowns for wheat storage during the harvest of 2001.

          Even then, above 800 million people presently go to bed hungry; almost 200 million children under the age of five are underweight due to lack of food, and one child dies every seven seconds either from hunger or related causes. In Pakistan, the province of Punjab - a main wheat producer - ceased procurement of wheat instead it asked the provinces of Sindh, NWFP and Balochistan to purchase, directly, wheat from the farmers in 2001. Similarly, the farmers' bodies in Sindh recently went on protest with the complaint that Sindh Food Department showed least interest in buying the crop. Interestingly, the procurement of wheat has lost significance in Pakistan where 19 per cent of total population or 26.6 million people, as recently disclosed by World Food Programme, are either hungry, or undernourished or starving. This sharp contradiction leads toward a depressive conclusion that the huge quantity of food grains is either for minting money or for decay. That it is readily available not to the hapless subjects but to the traders and termites, rats and insects.

          Likewise, a worsening scenario also prevails in India. As such, most Indian people lack purchasing power to buy food and the farmer did not get procurement price last year (2000) while Indian Prime Minister Vajpayee usually boosts of his Green Revolution to prove how his country had produced surplus. Surely, India produced a huge surplus, all places for food grain storage had been glutted. Consequently, 10 per cent of food grains are wasted during storage, because most of the fresh crop is lying under open sky. Does such a huge surplus eliminate the hunger of the Indian nation consisting of 950 million people? Certainly not! As a recent report by World Food Programme indicates, India even after the Green Revolution has 22 per cent of the total population (204.4 million people) that are either hungry or without adequate food.

          Not only that, the Indian government's programmes for provision of food grain to the poverty-stricken people failed because of the entitled buyers' inability to reach the subsidies shops. Therefore, ratio of deaths with starvation and of suicides due to hunger is on the rise. This distributive injustice forced 17.3 million people to migrate within Indian national borders to seek food while million of farmers having being ruined by domestic market forces are forced to join the trend of transmigration in India. Identical situation, rather graver in nature, exists in Bangladesh where 44 per cent of the total population (consisting of 126.6 million people) are hungry, though the country obtained agrarian boom in 2000-2001. Although, food grain conditions are comparatively better in Pakistan than that of India and Bangladesh, as the World Food Programme reports that rate of hunger is very high in Bangladesh, moderately high in Indian and moderately low in Pakistan. Yet, procurement arrangements for food grain are far better particularly in India than in Pakistan as the former remains under constant pressure within democratic structure of power to ensure food security within national borders.

          As such, Food Corporation of India usually has to purchase wheat from the provincial states in order to give the same to the public on subsidised rate. For instance, during harvest of 2000 the Centre had to buy stocks from Punjab, Haryana, parts of UP and Andhra Pradesh because of political pressure by the states. To the contrary, Pakistan Agricultural Storage and Supply Corporation (PASSCO) is at present strictly acting upon the policy of "Deregulation", virtually discontinuing procurement, so that free commodity market be given chance to flourish in response to the international donors' demand. Consequently, today the farmers find no buyers while tomorrow the people will find no wheat, as adverse affects of draught, increase in demand of wheat in Afghanistan and Azad Kashmir enable market forces to make money out of stocking of wheat. However, apart from some variations in public sector arrangements, the overall situation of food deficit instead of high yield is equally adverse in all the South Asian states.

          In fact, hunger and surplus persist hand in hand as a global phenomenon, which is a bigger challenge to the free market economy that preaches global prosperity. Similarly, it is a bigger challenge to the print and electronic media in the developed world that give more attention to pets than to 40,000 children dying of hunger daily. The contrast of hunger and surplus poses gravest challenge to the modern state which seems far more concerned with human rights, ignoring silent deaths of millions of people. The society lacks collective approach toward evident human catastrophe and the ultra-sensitive modern man is hardly aware of children and women, old and young sleeping hungry in his neighbourhood. Will anybody come forward to remove this ugly spot on the apparently glittering face of the contemporary world? Has this unattended human misery any viable solution? Yes, it has; if the managers of global economy and the ruling elite that have failed to ensure distributive justice and administrative fairness realise gravity of the fabricated disaster in objective perspective. If arrival of modern technology has enabled us to get much more than our domestic requirement, then it is a matter of shame for us that people go to bed hungry while godowns are glutted.

          The author is serving in the Senate secretariat, Islamabad


          --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          Comment


            #6
            Link?


            ------------------
            CROIRE A L'INCROYABLE

            I Came I Saw I ATE
            You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by CM:
              Link?


              Why is your's missing?

              Comment


                #8
                This is funny. The farmers of Punjab prefer growing crops other that Wheat as the returns are more lucrative. Things are changing though as the govenment is improving ROI for the farmers. Wheat will be a surpluss crop in a matter of a few years. Mostly Cotton is grown in Punjab which is followed by Wheat and then vegetables and fruits. Punjab produces more Cotton which is of infinetley better quality than the one produced across the border in India.
                BTW the area under wheat cultivation in Pakistan is 2 and a half times greater than cotton. Now how do I know this? Well I worked for an Agro Chemical multinational while in Pakistan.
                I don't see the point of the thread though? Is is implying that the farmers of Paki Punjab are incompotent or the land is not fertile?

                Comment


                  #9
                  >>>I don't see the point of the thread though?

                  You are right. It was another case where someone is trying to feel better by comparing the sizes.

                  Comment

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