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    Ahmad Shah Masood calls for International help against Pakistan

    Ref : http://www.dawn.com/2001/04/05/top1.htm
    --------------------------------------------

    Afghan opposition leader Ahmad Shah Masood made an impassioned plea on Wednesday for foreign aid in his war against the Taliban and called for diplomatic pressure against Taliban's backers in Pakistan.

    "Faced with the aggression of Pakistan, I give myself the right ... to seek aid everywhere," Mr Masood told a packed press conference here after a closed-door meeting with French Foreign Minister Hubert Vedrine.

    "What happened to the British (in the 19th century) and the Soviet Red Army will also happen to Pakistan," Mr Masood said.

    Mr Masood is on his first visit to Europe and on a rare foray from his bases in the snow-capped mountains of northeastern Afghanistan. During the 1980s, his battle against Soviet occupation earned him the title of "Lion of the Panjshir".

    He received a hero's welcome from Afghan opposition supporters cheering loudly as he entered the news conference.

    "Any help that countries can give us for reconquering our country, we need it," added the now-struggling commander, who has suffered a wave of setbacks but remains the sole serious obstacle to the Taliban's full control of Afghanistan.

    Accusing the Taliban of being directly propped up by Pakistan and Osama bin Laden, Mr Masood also warned the United States that "there will be no end to the current problems, which will only get worse" unless his fortunes were reversed.

    "To end the war, the international community must place strong pressure on Pakistan. This is what I raised with Mr Vedrine and what I will raise in all my meetings here," said Mr Masood.

    After Mr Vedrine's one-hour meeting with Mr Masood, the French foreign ministry issued a brief statement saying the current military and humanitarian situation in Afghanistan had been discussed, but no further details were given.

    Sources close to Mr Masood said the meeting with Mr Vedrine was "very positive", but declined to comment openly on whether subjects such as military or financial aid were broached.

    "The decision (on aid) rests with European deputies," a confident Mr Masood told the lively press conference in a plush Paris hotel.

    But the visit has been seen as a sign that the gloves have come off in Europe's diplomatic struggle with the Taliban, who have drawn global condemnation for their denial of women's rights and more recently their destruction of Afghanistan's ancient Buddhist statues in Bamiyan.

    The president of the European Parliament, Nicole Fontaine, who has invited Mr Masood to address the body on Thursday, also issued a call for European powers to provide more concrete support to the anti-Taliban movement.

    "It is important that France shows its support to the fight of those who, in Afghanistan, are opposing the fanatical Taliban regime," Mr Fontaine said.

    Mr Masood, a 49-year-old ethnic Tajik, is the vice-president and defence minister of the United Nations-recognized 'Islamic State of Afghanistan', but his forces wield control over just 10 per cent of Afghan soil.

    Mr Masood also met president of the national assembly, Socialist Raymond Forni, but officials confirmed he would not be meeting with President Jacques Chirac.

    Speaking in his native Dari and wearing his trademark wool hat, Mr Masood presented himself as a moderate Islamist keen to restore democracy and women's rights - even if he is seen as having failed on these during his shaky tenure in power from 1992 to 1996.

    He insisted that his alliance with other anti-Taliban factions was back on track after years of internecine fighting that aided the Taliban's conquest of the country, and pledged a wave of uprisings against the Taliban rule

    [This message has been edited by chilli (edited April 05, 2001).]

    #2
    Heck

    we should syupport any regime that puts s top to all teh smuggling of weapons and drugs from afghanistan. Ahmad Shah did not do a good job of it.

    I am not a Taliban fan, but that does not make Ahmad Shah a good choice.
    The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing the world he did not exist. And like that... he is gone.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Fraudz:


      we should syupport any regime that puts s top to all teh smuggling of weapons and drugs from afghanistan.

      couldnt agree more



      ------------------
      ~*~I'm not going to ask if you just said what I think you just said because I know it's what you just said.~*~DS

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Fraudz:
        Heck

        we should syupport any regime that puts s top to all teh smuggling of weapons and drugs from afghanistan. Ahmad Shah did not do a good job of it.

        I am not a Taliban fan, but that does not make Ahmad Shah a good choice.
        Dear Fradio! Taliban did exactly just that. Read some of the articles and news I put up in World Affairs.

        Number one reason why Masood is a bad choice? Because this guy who fought against USSR is now getting help from them to kill more Muslims. I think he forgot what they did to his people.


        ------------------
        *We are the Taleban-Resistance is Futile*
        Sin: Osama Bin Junior

        Comment


          #5
          yB

          thats why i am saying that whatever the regime is like, if it helps stop the drug and weapons smuggling to Pakistan, I would support it.

          Your own country's issues some first. Look at who all has been supported by US in the past
          The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing the world he did not exist. And like that... he is gone.

          Comment


            #6
            http://famulus.msnbc.com/FamulusIntl...4.asp?reg=ASIA


            Afghan peace possible, Pakistan a problem - Masood

            DUSHANBE, April 10 Ahmad Shah Masood, head of the armed resistance to Afghanistan's Taliban, said on Tuesday he did not rule out a peace dialogue with the ruling movement, but Pakistan had to stop interfering in the conflict first.

            ''Despite all the existing problems, we have always been ready to sit down at the negotiating table with the Taliban,'' Masood told a meeting with journalists and Afghan people living abroad in Tajikistan in the Tajik capital Dushanbe.
            ''We may even accept the setting up of a provisional government jointly with the Taliban, but for a term no longer than half a year or a year,'' he said.
            ''Then it would be necessary to hold general elections in Afghanistan under the aegis of the United Nations and the group of countries united within the 'six-plus-two' formula.''
            The six-plus-two countries include Afghanistan's neighbours Iran, China, Pakistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan as well as Russia and the United States.
            Afghanistan has been ravaged by war for two decades, first after a 1979 invasion by Soviet troops which ended with a full withdrawal 10 years later and then by fighting between various warlords.
            Masood was driven out of Kabul by the Taliban in 1996 and has held on to a small part of northern Afghanistan since.
            Paying a rare visit to the West last week, Masood called on wealthy nations to put pressure on Pakistan, which he accused of backing the Taliban, to mediate in the conflict and deliver humanitarian aid to ease the suffering of civilians.

            MARIONETTE GOVERNMENT
            Masood, whose forces remain loyal to ousted President Burhanuddin Rabbani but control just 10 percent of Afghan territory, kept to his anti-Pakistan rhetoric on Tuesday.
            ''The main cause of the conflict in Afghanistan is Pakistan, its army and its secret services,'' he said. ''Pakistan is trying to create a marionette government in Afghanistan.''
            Pakistan has vigorously denied all allegations of its involvement in the conflict.
            But Masood said: ''I have always told Pakistan's leadership -- do not hope to enslave us. We might be your friends if you changed your attitude towards Afghanistan.''
            Masood, a charismatic 47-year-old field commander who became known in the 1980s as the ''Lion of Panjsher'' for resisting Soviet efforts to seize this strategic stronghold, praised Russia's attempts to mediate in settling the current civil war.
            ''We are grateful to Russia for its assistance in settling the Afghan conflict,'' he said.
            Moscow has repeatedly voiced concern that the Afghan war and purist Islamic ideas of the Taliban conflict might splash over vast but sparsely populated ex-Soviet Central Asia, seen by some Kremlin politicians as Russia's soft underbelly.
            Masood said there were grounds for such fears.
            ''This (Taliban) grouping wants to spread its radical ideas not only in Afghanistan but, with the help of the drug trade and terrorism, in Central Asia as well,'' he said.
            In the past two years, armed forces in neighbouring Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan have fought off attacks by armed bands of Islamic extremists, which local officials say are funded by proceeds from arms trade and trafficking of cheap Afghan opium.
            Masood said his troops were holding in captivity several Uzbek citizens who had fought for the Taliban.




            Comment


              #7
              Masood a Guy whi is clearly supported by India, russia and America cannot be a friend to afghans people...people like him are after power, they don't give a damn about afghanistan.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Fraudz:
                Heck

                we should syupport any regime that puts s top to all teh smuggling of weapons and drugs from afghanistan. Ahmad Shah did not do a good job of it.

                I am not a Taliban fan, but that does not make Ahmad Shah a good choice.
                So you are then a fan of talibs Freddo.

                Comment

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