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    Satellite

    With india counding down on it's first space rocket test how far behind is pakistan??


    Countdown on for Indian space rocket test: MADRAS, March 28: India was counting down on Wednesday to the first test of a poirst srful rocket that is hoped will put the country in a small club of nations capabpacewsatellites. The first test flight of the Geo-synchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle, or the GSLV-D1, was expected between 10:15 GMT and 14:15 GMT from the space centre at Sriharikota, 100 km (62 miles) north of Madras on the Bay of Bengal. The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) is hoping the system will enable India to launch its own communications satellites and provide satellite launches as a profitable service. (Reuters)

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    Hated by many~~Loved by few~~But respected by All~~

    #2
    Technical snag aborts GSLV launch
    SRIHARIKOTA: The much-awaited launch of the powerful Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) was aborted on Wednesday when a fire broke out shortly after ignition.

    Flames appeared to lick their way up the three-stage GSLV seconds after the engines were fired on schedule at 3:47 pm. Mission control at the Sriharikota launch site in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh immediately cut the engines and aborted the launch.

    As well as the expectations of thousands of scientists, engineers and industrialists involved in its development, the rocket will be carrying a 1.54 tonne experimental satellite GSAT-1.

    The three-stage, 49-metre (161-foot) high GSLV is the most technologically challenging project so far undertaken by the Indian space programme.

    A copybook flight would signal a quantum shift towards self-reliance in the rocket industry, and secure a foothold for India in the multi-billion-dollar satellite launch market -- dominated by the United States, the European consortium ArianeSpace, Russia and relative newcomer China.

    The cost of launching a satellite aboard the GSLV has been estimated at between $15,000 and $16,000 per kilogram.

    The GSLV has been 10 years in the making, during which time the project's cost has almost doubled from $165 million.

    Previous launch vehicles, with satellite payloads ranging from 40 kilograms to one tonne have failed to place their satellites in the correct orbits, placing even more pressure on the performance of the GSLV.

    The level of national pride riding on Wednesday's launch has been heightened by a dispute with the United States which almost derailed the entire project.

    In 1992, the United States imposed a two-year technology embargo after one of its companies, General Dynamics, unsuccessfully negotiated for a contract to provide the cryogenic engines for the GSLV.

    ISRO then signed a $120-million contract with the Russian space agency Glavcosmos to acquire two flight-worthy cryogenic engines, with the deal including an important technology transfer component.

    Washington intervened, saying the technology transfer would be in violation of the Missile Technology Control Regime, and a fresh contract had to be signed with Glavcosmos in 1993 under which the transfer was denied.

    The Russians handed over the first cryogenic engine in September 1998.

    India started work on developing its own cryogenic engine in 1994, and has so far achieved a test-firing of 13 seconds.

    The countdown to Wednesday's launch actually began 58 hours before on Monday morning. The window for the launch extends up to 7:41 pm.

    Nearly 150 large, medium and small Indian industries were involved in GSLV project, supplying a variety of components. (AFP)
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    From the sounds of it, looks like it blew up. but they want to call it a technical snag so we will leave it at that for now.

    Comment


      #3
      What about pakistan-do they have such projects in the pipeline if so how advanced are they??

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      Hated by many~~Loved by few~~But respected by All~~

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        #4
        Pakistan is still trying to understand the manual written in chinese.

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          #5
          >>>Pakistan is still trying to understand the manual written in chinese<<<

          and when we are done reading all the manuals i assure u... when someone says liftoff it will go a lot further than indian vegitable oil run space crafts. they tell me it didnt even move after liftoff. hahahhahaha

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by sajjadm:
            Pakistan is still trying to understand the manual written in chinese.
            JUST THE WAY INDIANS USED TO UNDERSTAND RUSSIAN.

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              #7
              Still, some indian did not really understood what was in the Russian Manual, so one of the Russian Imported Engine failed to works..so bad...
              There are only two forces in the world, the sword and the spirit. In the end the sword will always be conquered by the spirit. --Napoleon Bonaparte

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                #8
                This is hilarious!!!
                When is the next try??
                In 2 years!!!
                Pakistan is waaaaaaaay behind.
                We only have 2 satelittes up.
                India has far more than that.

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                CROIRE A L'INCROYABLE
                You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

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                  #9
                  Now paki's started mannual stratergy ... shame shame ..... but thats not ur problem u can think only that systems are made by reading mannuals .... u don't no indigeneous systems ....

                  but i am sure that pakistan must be celebrating today ..... what is the problem i we cannt make such system ... India also failed to do so ....
                  He was a self made man who owed his lack of success to nobody.
                  - Author on Cargill in 'Catch 22'

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                    #10
                    i'm pretty much confused at the naivity of the majority of indians.. do they really think that they are actually developing or have the capabilities of developing indigeneous systems.. somewhere along the line the sensitive technology most of the time has come from russia through the back door i must congragulate india for it is excelling in the propagonga against pakistan that it's even forgot that it does have a door step of it's own..

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                    Hated by many~~Loved by few~~But respected by All~~

                    [This message has been edited by TySoN (edited March 29, 2001).]

                    Comment


                      #11
                      http://www.rediff.com/news/2001/mar/29gslv.htm

                      I saw some newspapers Thursday morning and was wondering how they could use provocative phrases like "setback to the Indian space programme" and "failure of the mission". It is completely wrong to perceive it that way.

                      Actually nothing unusual happened. What happened was just a normal testing process before the launch of India's first Geo-synchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle. There is an in-built safety system in our computer systems that would shut off the launch automatically if anything was wrong.

                      We have four strap-on engines and 4.6 seconds before lift off, computers check whether all are functioning normally. Unless all the four engines perform to normal levels, we do not ignite the fifth motor which is the core motor. The four engines run on liquid fuel and the core engine runs on solid fuel.

                      At 3.6 seconds, we assessed the performance and one was found to be below the 90 per cent performance level. It did not have the necessary thrust for lift off. So as I said, the computer switched the system off.

                      If we had let the GSLV go up, it would have been a failure. We have not failed. There is only a delay, as a re-launch will happen soon.

                      There is absolutely no room for pessimism. It is just a matter of a few weeks before we get ready for another launch.

                      I cannot exactly tell you when the rescheduled launch is going to be because it all depends on the nature of the problem. Our scientists are studying what went wrong and they should know it in another three days or so.

                      Within minutes of the aborted launch, we were already busy unloading all the fuel so that our scientists could go to the launch pad and make checks. The unloading is almost over. We will now put our action plan to work that will end in a rescheduled launch.

                      The used engine can be easily replaced by a standby engine. We will soon know what we need to do after preliminary studies are over.

                      The writer is Director, Indian Space Research Organisation, Sriharikota Range

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Rediff = crap.
                        You understand that yet Sajjadm?

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                        CROIRE A L'INCROYABLE
                        You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

                        Comment

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