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Taliban turn down Pak request for extradicating sunni terrorists

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    Taliban turn down Pak request for extradicating sunni terrorists

    Rediff.
    http://www.rediff.com/news/2001/jan/23tale.htm

    #2
    thats thier motto, refuse every one everything.
    Thats why they even are refusing to provide even the basic neccessities of life to thier own ppl.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by mm10:
      thats thier motto, refuse every one everything.
      Thats why they even are refusing to provide even the basic neccessities of life to thier own ppl.
      Basic necessities of life?

      And what might that be? TV? VCR? Bollywood? Lollywood? Hollywood?
      Think with your head! Not your ass!


      ------------------
      *We are the Taleban-Resistance is Futile*
      Sin: Osama Bin Junior

      Comment


        #4
        This article is form that notorious Indian rag Rediff, so until I something from a serious source no comment.

        Comment


          #5
          If it is rediff it is crap.

          ------------------
          CROIRE A L'INCROYABLE
          You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by CM:
            If it is rediff it is crap.

            how about pakistani 'The Friday Times'.
            ____________________________________________

            Taliban refuse to extradite terrorists


            Amir Mir
            says the Taliban militia is not likely to hand over sectarian terrorists to Pakistan


            --------------------------------------------------------------------------------




            --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

            Pakistan's ambassador to Kabul, Arif Ayub, has told the foreign office and the government of Pakistan that he is not optimistic about a breakthrough on the issue. In fact, in a recent statement the Taliban militia's interior ministry spokesman was quoted as saying that there was no question of handing over any fugitives to Pakistan


            --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


            The forthcoming visit of federal interior minister, Lt-Gen (retd) Moinuddin Haider, to Afghanistan to ask the Taliban authorities to extradite dozens of sectarian terrorists to Pakistan is unlikely to yield positive results, say sources.

            While Pakistan insists that these terrorists carry out sectarian killings in Pakistan and then escape to their hideouts in Afghanistan, the Taliban authorities have denied that Kabul is harbouring any such elements.

            Interior ministry sources informed TFT that despite repeated requests by the military regime to extradite dozens of Pakistani nationals wanted for sectarian killings, the Taliban militia has not responded positively to the requests. TFT has learnt that the lists given to the Taliban authorities include roughly 60 sectarian terrorists, most of whom are accused of killing members of the Shia community and also scores of law enforcement officials.

            However, says an official, the military regime is primarily interested in arresting the top two dozen or so of these terrorists belonging to the Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, an offshoot of the Deobandi Sipah-e-Sahaba Pakistan and the most viciously anti-Shia sectarian organisation.

            Insiders say Pakistan's ambassador to Kabul, Arif Ayub, has told the foreign office and the government of Pakistan that he is not optimistic about a breakthrough on the issue. In fact, in a recent statement the Taliban militia's interior ministry spokesman was quoted as saying that there was no question of handing over any fugitives to Pakistan. "This is despite the fact that Pakistan was the first country to recognise the Taliban regime and remains only one of the three countries to do so," the official pointed out.

            However, senior officials at the foreign office say the visit will go ahead as scheduled. "We hope that something might come out of it," says one official, adding: "We are going to formally ask for the extradition of 24 sectarian terrorists.

            The government's decision to try and prevail upon the Taliban on this issue is based on some highly sensitive intelligence reports that have expressed fear of a fresh spate of terrorist attacks in the country. "The issue of the terrorists hiding in Afghanistan is certainly on top of the agenda during Haider's upcoming Kabul visit, expected in the last week of January," a senior government official told TFT.

            While sources declined to reveal names of the terrorists on the list, they said that all of them belong to the Deobandi sectarian outfit, Lashkar-e-Jhangvi. However, TFT did get the list and the 24 names on it (see box). The terrorists on the list carry a total head money of over Rs 20 million. Intelligence reports suggest that while these terrorists remain in hiding, they have been trying to extend their network inside Pakistan and might be planning extensive operations in the weeks to come (see story on page 4).

            However, the Taliban militia, itself a rabidly anti-Shia outfit, has so far refused to cooperate with Islamabad. In May last year, when the Taliban interior minister, Mulla Abdur Razzak, visited Pakistan, he feigned surprise over the fugitives issue, saying he had no information of any such elements hiding in Afghanistan. He promised at the time, nevertheless, that the militia would co-operate with Islamabad in this regard.

            The other items on Haider's agenda for the visit include the supply of wheat to Afghanistan, the issue of ATT (Afghan Transit Trade) smuggling and regional peace. The exact date of the visit will be finalised after Ambassador Ayub's meeting with the Taliban interior minister.

            "The ambassador will be in Islamabad on January 18-20 in connection with the envoys' conference and would also brief the government about his talks with the Afghan interior minister and the schedule of Haider's visit to Kabul," an FO official told TFT.

            The sectarian terrorist who tops the list is Muhammad Riaz Basra. Basra was convicted for assassinating Aqai Sadiq Ganji, the director-general of the Iranian Cultural Centre in Lahore on December 19, 1990. Basra escaped from police custody in Lahore and now carries a head money of Rs 5 million. He has become a mythical figure of sorts, having defied all efforts by successive governments to arrest him.

            Basra also figures on a US list of terrorists which describes him as the "would-be assassin" of now exiled premier Nawaz Sharif. On January 3, 1999, a bridge on the Lahore-Raiwind road, close to Mr Sharif's palatial rural retreat, was blown up shortly before Sharif's cavalcade was due to pass that way. Basra was alleged to be involved in the incident. Sightings of the fugitive have been reported from various places in Pakistan in the past four or five years, and newspapers have often received fax messages purportedly sent by him, claiming responsibility for some sectarian attacks. On April 5, 1999, police in Sargodha had claimed that he was killed in an encounter. But his mother's testimony and forensic tests disproved the police claim.

            Riaz Basra's name also figures on a list submitted in testimony before a sub-committee of the House of Representatives' judiciary committee by the State Department's former counter-terrorism chief, Michael Sheehan. Basra is believed to have fought in Afghanistan in the '80s against the Russians. Later, he joined a militant Sunni outfit - Sipah-i-Sahaba - but subsequently set up his own terrorist organisation, Lashkar-e-Jhangvi. During the last days of the Sharif government, a senior military official was flown to Kabul to request the Taliban government to help arrest Riaz Basra.


            Comment


              #7
              cm, malik, any comnments on friday times, or it is also notorious and biased.

              Comment


                #8
                ZZ thanks for calling on me and my cheeky buddy to reply to your post, but what did you want us to say? Notice the difference in tone between what the rediff rag says and TFT?


                While TFT is reporting the actual events without any particular bias, the rediff rag starts out in a deliberately negative and bias tone. Note how it starts by saying " Differences between Pakistan's military regime and the Taleban regime of Afghanistan have come to the fore."

                Differences can emerge between the best of friends, but that does not mean that PAK and Afghanistan are going to come to blows over this matter, as you and rediff are hoping. Moin is still going to Kabul and the Taliban are still on good terms with Pakistan.

                So stop draeming

                Comment


                  #9
                  tone may be different. but both are telling the same fact that taliban do not want to extradicate people that pakistan considers terrorists.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    So you admit that the tone is different? That just proves why CM and I among others were right about the BIAS of rediff.

                    There refusal at this point to extradite these people at this moment, is certainly not going to lead to the sort of animosity you are hoping (dreaming) of between PAK and Afghanistan.

                    If you do your homework then you will find out that the Taliban have been reluctant to extradite people before, but have relented in time.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      tone does not change the facts. if a girl tells u that she does not want to marry u, do u care if it said with a smile or frown. result is the same.

                      it will not cause any animosity because pakistan is ruled by sunni punjabis and if some people take it as their religious uty to kill others, they dont care.

                      [This message has been edited by ZZ (edited January 24, 2001).]

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Talibans operate independently and their decisions are free of any outside influence. They keep not only their national interest in mind, but also goodness for the whole Muslim community. They are highly commandable for that cuz that's something not too many nations/leaders can accomplish. Let me quote something from the Pakistani Friday Times article you have pasted above:

                        Basra also figures on a US list of terrorists which describes him as the "would-be assassin" of now exiled premier Nawaz

                        Sharif Riaz Basra's name also figures on a list submitted in testimony before a sub-committee of the House of Representatives' judiciary committee by the State Department's former counter-terrorism chief, Michael Sheehan.

                        Basra is believed to have fought in Afghanistan in the '80s against the Russians.


                        There u go...
                        Has it crossed your mind that maybe it's not Pakistani government who is looking for these guys but someone else. Perhaps the U.S. maybe. If the name of one of these guys made it to the sub-committee in the House of Representatives, he is definitely a someone very important to the U.S. And when U.S. chases someone, it's more of a personal motive than an interest in the international welfare. And it's not Nawaz Sharif either. He is that factor of history even the east doesn't consider worth thinking about let alone the west. If they can go in and get Amil Kansi, what's the guarantee that U.S. isn't the one pressuring Pakistan to go after these guys? And in the process also try their best to damage Afghan/Pak relations and single out Afghanistan. Killing two birds with one arrow has always been the greatest U.S. strategy.

                        However, both Pakistan and Afghanistan are mature states beyond the U.S. imagination. They know better than endangering their personal relationships for a third party. Your queary which you have tried to support thru the rediff article and Friday times is completely baseless.


                        [This message has been edited by Rarediamonds & Gold (edited January 24, 2001).]

                        Comment


                          #13
                          R D&G is correct. What Pakistan is saying publicly and what Pakstan is doing privately are two different things. Don't be surprised if officially Pakistan is asking for certain people to be extradited, but behind the scenes is shaking hands with Sheikh Omar with a nudge here and a wink there.

                          This is the nature of politics, as Indians well understand.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            so do u want to say that there are no sectarian killings in pak and the killers do not get shelter in afghanistan? i am sure pak rulers dont care, but shias might.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Now you are concerned about Shias in Pakistan? How touching.

                              Comment

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