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    US praises Musharraf as ' a man of his word'.

    As I predicted getting rid of Nawaz would bear fruit for Musharraf's government. And indeed it as - the outgoing US administration id praising Musharraf's honesty, his economic ans social reforms and his restraint on Kashmir.

    Additionally, the US has announced millions to fund private Pakistani education and an easing on the curbs to Pakistani technology exports.

    Things are looking very good for Pakistan and we have a unique chance to build an effective relationship with the incoming Bush administration.

    http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/jan20...main/main3.htm
    'US to continue supporting democracy through NGOs'


    Inderfurth says US wants a moderate Pakistan as envisaged by Jinnah; praises Musharraf

    News Desk

    WASHINGTON: Outgoing US Assistant Secretary of State for South Asia Karl Inderfurth has praised General Musharraf as "a man of his word" who promised not to be vindictive against Nawaz Sharif and pardoned him later.

    Inderfurth was briefing South Asian newsmen for the last time before leaving his post for the new Republican nominee, yet to be named by President-elect Bush.

    He said Nawaz Sharif's departure was "a decision of Government of Pakistan" and said Gen Musharraf had said he was "not a vindictive man". "The pardon of Nawaz Sharif proves that Musharraf is a man of his word," he said.

    Inderfurth said if Pakistan sticks to the IMF programme, US will continue to support Islamabad. "US will also continue assistance for democracy through NGOs," he added. On present efforts to resolve the Kashmir issue, Inderfurth said it was home-grown. The biggest achievement of the Clinton administration in South Asia, was the resolution of the F-16 issue with Pakistan.

    He said it was more important as to how Afghanistan was governed rather than who governed it. Taliban must comply with the latest UN resolutions. Inderfurth said new Secretary of State Colin Powell had been briefed at length on South Asia. "The new administration will continue to follow the Clinton administration policies," he hoped.

    APP adds: Talking to Washington's South Asian Press Corp, Inderfurth said: "The United States would like to see Pakistan a moderate and stable state as envisaged by its founder Muhammad Ali Jinnah."

    "Washington wants to see a Pakistan that is stable, democratic and prosperous. It wants to see Pakistan develop as a moderate state in line with the vision of its founder," he said.

    He said that the US was staying engaged with Pakistan and it would do what it could to reinforce the positive trends. Asked what role, if any, the United States had played in what appeared to be the start of a process of detente in the sub-continent, especially with reference to Kashmir, Inderfurth replied what was being witnessed today was entirely "home-grown" and a direct result of the efforts made by the leadership in the region. He said that those outside the region or "others" were greatly interested in this developing situation and would support the process. He said that the Clinton administration was leaving South Asia on a "hopeful note" and it appeared that there were chances of a "serious dialogue" between India and Pakistan.

    He reminded the journalists that President Clinton had said more than once that he would like to see India and Pakistan resume their dialogue and it seemed conditions now existed for it to materialise.

    He referred to the ceasefire in held Kashmir, the withdrawal of some forces by Pakistan from the Line of Control, the "maximum restraint" exercised by Pakistan and the impending visit of the All Parties Hurriyet Conference (APHC) leaders to Pakistan as signs that things were moving in a positive direction. He appeared to be in no doubt that the incoming Republican administration would continue the policies of the Clinton administration and support the present trends in the region.

    Answering a question, Inderfurth said that there had been positive developments in Pak-US relations and referred to the Brownback amendment that had made it possible for the United States to support education programmes in Pakistan, despite the existing sanctions. He said that several million dollars had already been set aside in current funding for the purpose and a US team had been sent to Pakistan to make an on-spot study so that assistance could be funnelled in the right programmes.

    He indicated that NGOs would have a role to play in this and they would receive financial assistance from Washington in support of their efforts to spread education and raise the level of literacy. "Education is of fundamental importance," he said.

    Inderfurth expressed satisfaction with the state of Pak-US relations and referred to the recent agreement between Pakistan and the IMF as well as the forthcoming meeting of the Paris Club. He said that the best antidote to extremism was economic reform. He recalled that during his Pakistan visit, President Clinton had told General Pervez Musharraf that the United States supported his economic revival programme.

    Among the "specific accomplishments" of the Clinton administration, he listed the settlement of the outstanding F-16 dispute with Pakistan and the payment to Pakistan of the outstanding amount from the aborted aircraft deal in the form of food. He called the detonation of nuclear bombs in 1998 by India and Pakistan and the Kargil conflict as "disappointments".

    Asked about his successor, he said that he was in no position to answer the question but, if asked by the incoming administration, he would express his opinion. During questioning, the name of Shirin Tahirkheli was mentioned more than once, mostly by Indian correspondents who have been filing unhelpful stories about her to their newspapers, emphasising her Pakistani origins.

    Inderfurth was confident that his successor would be a person best suited for the job that he called exciting. He said that in all his years at the State Department, he might have had days when the news was bad but he had never had a bad day. He called South Asia a fascinating area.

    Inderfurth expressed great admiration for the new Republican Secretary of State, General Colin Powell to whom he had provided a two-hour briefing on South Asia last week. He said that the General had come without aides, had asked a lot of questions and taken copious notes. He called it a "good session".

    #2
    Good news, but we really don't care what the US has to say.
    We deal with our own, the way we want.
    To hell with the rest of the world.
    If the US is happy so what.
    It is the pakistan people we should worry about.
    And they are pretty happy with the CE.

    ------------------
    CROIRE A L'INCROYABLE
    You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

    Comment


      #3
      Yes of course they don't count, but it's good to know they have a very favourable impression of the CE . That's the Indian propoganda machine left with egg on its faces again!

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by CM:
        Good news, but we really don't care what the US has to say.
        We deal with our own, the way we want.
        To hell with the rest of the world.
        If the US is happy so what.
        It is the pakistan people we should worry about.
        And they are pretty happy with the CE.


        CM you need money from outside world to for the big defense spending. you have no choice
        you have to listen to and accept advise
        from international comunity.

        Comment


          #5
          rvikz a decent post.
          Yes we need money from outside.
          But they can't interfere in your internal affairs.
          They should take a leaf out of China's book.
          They don't deal with internal affairs and deal on a purely economic and trade basis.
          Which i think pakistan should follow.
          And i believe it has started to do so.
          And we can always tell them to get lost and switch to the opposite side, ie China, Iran, etc.
          Libya has done really well without western help.

          ------------------
          CROIRE A L'INCROYABLE
          You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

          Comment


            #6
            rivkz as if India doesn't need money from the outside world to fund its 10 billion dollar defence budget? You guys are borrowing some 4 billion dollars from the World Bank this year, and a further 2 billion dollars in aid from the west.

            Comment


              #7
              CM: they DO interfere in our internal affairs and will continue to do so, directly, through NGOs, IMF, etc. We basically have to learn to live with it until we decide to tighten our belts and live within our budget. Then we will be able to withstand their pressures. If they really want our well being, all they have to do is return the billions of $ looted by our politicians, etc., which are stashed away in their banks and they know it.

              Malik 73: thanks for posting the article - just one request: could you please not bring India into (almost) every discussion concerning Pakistan. Let us try and do what is best for us without continuously comparing with India.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Awam ki Awaz:
                Malik 73: thanks for posting the article - just one request: could you please not bring India into (almost) every discussion concerning Pakistan. Let us try and do what is best for us without continuously comparing with India.
                With this as you are well aware malik sahab,I agree completely.
                But awam ki awaz to be fair,malik's comments generally donot mention india until the indians come in a thread.So I think his comments are aimed at indians which is quite fair.That is so because generally the indian attitude towards pakistan remains contemptuous until they are reminded of their own home relities.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Awam I hear what you are saying and if you notice it is some jealous Indians who always have to to contribute their two annay of envy/jealousy in every good thread about Pakistan. As Ahmed has said they deserve a befitting reply to show them were they are from, what their position is and where they are going.

                  [This message has been edited by Malik73 (edited January 12, 2001).]

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Its nice.

                    But Pakistan should get out of debt as soon as possible. If Pakistan continues to be under the debt and under billions of IMF $$$ we will never be able to recover. It will be just the same after 100 years. WE MUST PAY OFF THE DEBT, its the only way out!!!

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                    *V~V~V*He came, He saw, He conquered*V~V~V*
                    ______________
                    -_-_-_-High Priest_-OF-_Painful Truth-_-_-_-

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Very true Watcher we have to work towards being less dependent on foreign loans. But we can not have that if only 1% of our population pay taxes and half our economy remains undocumented. And that sadly has been the case until recently.

                      But when he came to pwer General Musharraf promised action on this front and he has kept his promise. He announced a programme to document the economy and to increase the tax base of the country. And despite fierce opposition from selfish trader interests he has successfully moved forward on this front.

                      The tax revenues of Pakistan are rising and with the widening of the tax base they will increase rapidly over the years. It may take 3 to 5 years before we see breakthrough results but if the tax widening/documentation of the economy continues then sure enough we will become less dependent on foreign loans.

                      [This message has been edited by Malik73 (edited January 12, 2001).]

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Malik73:
                        Very true Watcher we have to work towards being less dependent on foreign loans. But we can not have that if only 1% of our population pay taxes and half our economy remains undocumented. And that sadly has been the case until recently.

                        But when he came to pwer General Musharraf promised action on this front and he has kept his promise. He announced a programme to document the economy and to increase the tax base of the country. And despite fierce opposition from selfish trader interests he has successfully moved forward on this front.

                        The tax revenues of Pakistan are rising and with the widening of the tax base they will increase rapidly over the years. It may take 3 to 5 years before we see breakthrough results but if the tax widening/documentation of the economy continues then sure enough we will become less dependent on foreign loans.

                        [This message has been edited by Malik73 (edited January 12, 2001).]
                        mallik i dont blame the people of pakistan
                        not paying taxes because they think money ends up somewhere else or they used to buy
                        expensive arms. but they should pay electrical bill atleast

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by The Watcher:
                          Its nice.

                          But Pakistan should get out of debt as soon as possible. If Pakistan continues to be under the debt and under billions of IMF $$$ we will never be able to recover. It will be just the same after 100 years. WE MUST PAY OFF THE DEBT, its the only way out!!!

                          This I think is the only solution but(there is always a big butt in the way)how will the gvt. get the taxes paid as we have seen what happened when they made people pay by force(strikes, rallys ect..)

                          But I hope Pakistan gets into Shape soon as we are runnin outta time(as Watcher has stated)and once the clock goes hay wire we will be neck deep in debt!!!


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                          my best friend is he who critizes my faults

                          Imam jaffar-Saddiq

                          Comment


                            #14
                            rvikz you would be surprised at the level of tax collection across South Asia. If you look at the figures for India and Bangladesh you will see their performance on tax collection is abysmal as well. This a particular curse of all South Asia due to the corruption and poverty of our region.

                            But apart from the enforcement of a tax regime there are other ways to increase national revenues e.g. foreign investment, economic cooperation with neighbours e.g. Iran and Central Asia and the exploitation of the enegry sector. And whatever the doomsayers may say Pakistan is moving ahead in leaps and bonuds in these area's.

                            There has been unprecedented NEW foreign investment in Pakistan, especially in the last few months.


                            http://www.nation.com.pk/daily/today/business/bn4.htm

                            Major Cos to invest over Rs 12b in Pakistan: Atta

                            KARACHI (APP)-During the last four weeks alone investment over Rs. 12 billion have been announced for Pakistan by major companies from across the world.
                            This was stated by the Federal Minister for Science and Technology, Prof. Dr. Atta-ur-Rehman, while delivering Convocation address at the Convocation 2001 of NED University of Engineering and Technology Karachi at its campus on Friday.

                            He said that these companies include Cisco, Oracle, IBM, Cern in Geneva, and Matorolla."Its beginning to happen. We have a long way to go", the Minister remarked.

                            However, he made it clear that the real problem that we have to address is education as without a very large number of highly educated, talented people in the area of computer sciences things will not'change.
                            Prof. Atta declared that 70 per cent of the budget allocated to his Ministry would be invested in education.

                            "We will invest in people, in libraries, equipment and real technology", he said adding that seven IT universities are being set up this year. Faculty from abroad would also be inducted.

                            A large number of training programmes have also been launched in various areas.
                            The Minister said that if we maintain to sustain this momentum in the next three to five years, we will see Pakistan moving forward as one of the major players in the IT area.

                            He stated that he has tremendous faith in the students and in the creativity that we have in our people.

                            Prof. Atta pointed out that till six months ago only 29 cities and towns had internet in the country.

                            On August 15 the Indian Prime Minister had announced a 10 year programme to spread internet across India. Two days later we announced a four month programme to spread internet across Pakistan.

                            "I am pleased to tell you that we have done it. It is a fact that today 325 towns, cities and villages have internet facility and PTCL has worked hard to make it possible", Prof. Atta remarked adding that some 70 to 80 per cent of the population of the country has internet access now.
                            The Minister said that we are setting up a whole series of internet kiosks at petrol stations, post offices, airports and railway stations so that access to internet is possible.




                            [This message has been edited by Malik73 (edited January 13, 2001).]

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Awam, do you see the US interfering in Saudi politics??
                              NO!!
                              Why?
                              Because SA controls oil.
                              What we need to do is get rid of the only thing they can control us with and that is the debt we owe them.
                              After that it is clear sailing.
                              I am sure of it.
                              Many nations work like that.
                              With no money or trade influence on us, they can't do ****.
                              And since the 1998 detonations trade with the west is minimal thus they don't have any leverage to force us to do anything.

                              And that is excellent news malik - the article at the bottom.

                              ------------------
                              CROIRE A L'INCROYABLE
                              You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

                              Comment

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