Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

bhutto's return headache for musharuff

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    bhutto's return headache for musharuff

    wil bhutto's return another headache for musharuff . he just got rid of one .
    will he arrest her creating sympathy for her

    #2
    if she comes back that is.

    ------------------
    CROIRE A L'INCROYABLE
    You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

    Comment


      #3
      rivkz obviously your claim is your PERSONAL opinion? You haven't provide any proof to back up your claim. Have you not considered that BB will not get such a rapturous reception as you think she will when she arrives in Pakistan (if she does)?

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by rvikz:
        wil bhutto's return another headache for musharuff . he just got rid of one .
        will he arrest her creating sympathy for her
        I don't think Musharraf ever had any headache. If BB is now planning to wind up her self exile, it only depicts that she was not smart enough to battle with Nawaz Sharif. How can she dare to lock horns with someone even mighter?

        CE has yet no betterment plan for the nation he has still to wait for quite sometime to explore & approve a new leadership.

        People of Pakistan have rejected the three, Nawaz, BB and Musharraf! and once again they are "waiting for Allah"!!

        Comment


          #5
          I don't think she will come.
          Like I said elsewhere she has the quickest heels in the subcontinent

          Comment


            #6
            Question is this the same girl who posted that weird stuff about parition eons back???
            Last two para's work that way.

            ------------------
            CROIRE A L'INCROYABLE
            You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

            Comment


              #7
              Bhutto to risk all on return from exile
              Tom Walker, Diplomatic Correspondent


              PAKISTAN'S former prime minister, Benazir Bhutto, is planning a daring return to her country in the spring, defying its military leadership and risking immediate arrest.

              Advisers in her Pakistan People's party (PPP) have told Bhutto her domestic support has grown since she was sacked in 1996 after allegations of corruption. They have calculated that General Pervez Musharraf, Pakistan's military ruler, will not wish to provoke violence by throwing her into prison.

              Aides say Bhutto would have broken her exile earlier had it not been for concerns over the fate of her three children, who are being educated in the Middle East.

              The Oxford graduate moved the family to Dubai from London last year to live with her ailing mother, Nusrat, but has now decided to gamble her future on a political comeback with a coalition dedicated to the removal of the military regime.

              Bhutto has been encouraged to return to the fray after her arch enemy Nawaz Sharif, another former premier, was allowed to slip into luxurious exile in Saudi Arabia last weekend. Inquiries by Sharif's government led to Bhutto's conviction in absentia in April 1999 to five years in jail, a verdict the PPP is appealing before the supreme court.

              Despite the hostility between Bhutto and Sharif, his Pakistan Muslim League (PML) is said to have splintered, with one faction supporting the cross-party coalition, the Alliance for the Restoration of Democracy.

              "Only democracy can save the country from sure collapse," said Wajid Hasan, an adviser to Bhutto and a former high commissioner. "The coalition parties have a one-point agenda for the time being."

              Hasan said Bhutto's return would be "spine-chilling for the generals" and claimed a crowd of 100,000 would greet her at Karachi airport. He said Bhutto would probably drive straight to a local court and apply for bail. "She is a very brave fighter," said Hasan.

              Bhutto has made no comment. Aides say she has been spending up to five hours a day e-mailing instructions to her party faithful in Pakistan, where she estimates her support has reached at least 30%.

              "The party intends to start corner meetings and build up a tempo to prepare the ground for Ms Bhutto's return," said Farhatullah Babar, the PPP's Islamabad spokesman.

              Bhutto's father, Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, was toppled as prime minister in a 1977 army coup and hanged. Her husband, Asif Ali Zardari, has been in jail for corruption since 1996.

              The democracy coalition will be led by Nasrullah Khan, of the Pakistan Democratic party, but PPP officials are confident Bhutto will be its figurehead. Bashir Riaz, the party's London spokesman, said the coalition would demand elections in September, a year before the military leadership is committed to holding them.

              Musharraf, sensing the danger that lies ahead, has been diplomatic about both the PPP and the PML, admitting they are the country's most popular parties. But he warned last week that a return to power for either would be "against the interests of the nation" and said the "very idea [of early elections] never came to my mind. There is a lot of disinformation in this regard".

              He insisted that widespread corruption under the Sharif and Bhutto governments had helped swell Pakistan's foreign debt from $14 billion 12 years ago to $38 billion today.

              Musharraf has promised "revolutionary" reform to establish a new political culture. Under the first phase of the plan, local elections are scheduled in 18 districts for December 31.

              Bhutto's supporters insist the return to democracy cannot be delayed, and Riaz said the PPP wanted to take immediate steps to clear Bhutto's name. He said the party had new evidence that proved the Sharif government had pressured the judiciary to convict Bhutto. "We've got ex-cellent tape recordings," he said.

              Bhutto's children, Bilawal, 11, Bakhtwar, 9, and Aseefa, 7, will remain in Dubai until their mother's chances of a political revival are clearer. "It's the question of what would happen to the children that has stopped her so far, but now the time is right," said one aide.

              Bhutto has rejected a government offer to consider the release of her husband if he follows Sharif's example of surrendering his assets and appealing for a pardon.

              The military regime's anti-corruption agency, the National Accountability Bureau, has claimed the family built up offshore assets worth $1.5 billion.

              "We are ready for arbitration to determine whether Asif has done any wrong or the government is keeping him in jail unlawfully," Bhutto said re-cently. Zardari, a former senator, is also charged over the murder of his wife's estranged brother, Murtaza, who was killed in a police shoot-out in Karachi in 1996.

              Aides say Bhutto may stage her return from exile on April 4, the anniversary of her father's execution.










              Comment


                #8
                rivkz notice how her ADVISORS are telling her all these wild stories of massive crowds etc. Where were the 100,000 strong crowds when she was convicted of corruption in 1998? I think they only managed a few hundred and that was in Sindh - her political stronghold!

                Comment

                Working...
                X