Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Islamabad Ranked Top S.Asian City -No.1 WoW

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Islamabad Ranked Top S.Asian City -No.1 WoW


    http://www.asiaweek.com/asiaweek/fea...cities.intro.h

    kha Email | Random Photo | Random Article
    Dec 11 Islamabad ranked top S Asian city ~ Jang (via Asiaweek) ~
    Islamabad has moved up two places, from 26th last year to 24th this
    year, in Asiaweek's new rankings of the top 40 key cities in Asia, ahead
    of Bangalore (27th, down one place from last year), Colombo (29th, down
    eight places from last year), Delhi (co-ranked 29th, up one place from
    last year), Bombay (33rd, up seven places from last year), Kathmandu
    (34th, up one place from last year), Chaittagong (unchanged at 37th),
    Karachi (37th, up one place from last year) and Dhaka (39th, down one
    place from last year). That makes Islamabad the top-ranked key city in
    the South Asian region on Asiaweek's quality of life index. Asiaweek's
    article is at http://www.asiaweek.com/asiaweek/fea...ities.intro.ht
    ml [

    ------------------

    "The greatest trick that the devil played was to convince that he doesn't exist"movie-Usual Suspect

    #2
    Sory guys ,these firangi of Asia week are not happy with that ,so they"moved" it somewhwee ,You can read the reporting of that in our JANG

    http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/dec20...0/world/w3.htm


    Islamabad up two places in

    new ranking of Asia's top 40 cities

    By Kaleem Omar

    Islamabad has moved up two places, from 26th last year to 24th this
    year, in Asiaweek's new rankings of the top 40 key cities in Asia, ahead
    of Bangalore (27th, down one place from last year), Colombo (29th, down
    eight places from last year), Delhi (co-ranked 29th, up one place from
    last year), Bombay (33rd, up seven places from last year), Kathmandu
    (34th, up one place from last year), Chaittagong (unchanged at 37th),
    Karachi (37th, up one place from last year) and Dhaka (39th, down one
    place from last year). That makes Islamabad the top-ranked key city in
    the South Asian region on Asiaweek's quality of life index.

    Islamabad is also ranked ahead of Manila (unchanged at 25th), Bandung
    (26th, up two places from last year), Jakarta (28th, up one place from
    last year), Chongoing (co-ranked 29th, up eight places from last year),
    Phnom Penh (co-ranked 29th, up two places from last year), Sarabaya
    (35th, down four places from last year), Yangon (36th, down two places
    from last year) and Vientiane (40th, down four places from last year).

    The Asiaweek rankings, which appear in the Hong Kong-based weekly
    magazine's issue of December 15, 2000, use a total of 27 indicators to
    determine which are the best cities to live in. These indicators
    include: average life expectancy; hospital beds per 1,000 people;
    per-capita state spending on education; average class size in primary
    school; university-educated people as a percentage of the total
    population; sulfur dioxide in the air (parts per million, ppm); nitrogen
    dioxide in the air (ppm); dust/suspended particles in the air -
    micrograms per cubic metre; average monthly rental per square metre;
    average price of a house or price range; and ratio of housing price to
    income.

    Other indicators include: square metres of parks and fields per capita;
    vehicles per kilometre of city roads; existence of mass transit railway
    system; number of movie theatres per 100,000 population; unemployment
    rate; gross domestic product (GDP) growth; annual urban inflation rate;
    vacation and public holidays per year; criminal cases for every 10,000
    people; number of telephones per 1,000 people; number of mobile phones
    per 1,000 people; Internet usage per 1,000 people; average time taken to
    commute to work; number of TV sets per 1,000 people; percentage of
    population with sewerage; and average income.

    Each indicator carries a different score according to its weighting in
    the various categories: economic conditions (total of 15 points
    available); quality of education (15); law and order (5); housing costs
    (10); healthcare and sanitation (15); transport and communications (15);
    and leisure (10). A slide down the chart isn't always a slip in absolute
    terms. But it is a nudge for cities to look more closely at areas where
    they can do better.

    Islamabad is ranked 27th in average income ($ 3,173), 25th in per-capita
    state spending on education ($ 74.72); 23rd in ratio of house price to
    income (45.46); 28th in hospital beds per 1,000 people (2); 37 th in
    dust/suspended particles in the air (2,385 micrograms per cubic metre);
    20th in vehicles per kilometre of city road (230); 34th in TV sets per
    1,000 people (100); and 2nd in least number of criminal cases per 10,000
    people (0.2). That makes Islamabad the second safest of the 40 key
    cities in Asia, behind only Bombay with 0.198 criminal cases per 10,000
    people.

    Islamabad scores a total of 51 points (out of a maximum of 100),
    Bangalore 45, Colombo 43, Delhi 43, Bombay 40, Kathmandu 39, Chittagong
    36, Karachi 36 and Dhaka 34. For all the hype about Bangalore's
    information-technology economy, its average income, at $ 1,789, is only
    56.38 per cent of Islamabad's, at $ 3,173. Although it is India's
    richest city, even Bombay's average income, at $ 2,515, is well below
    Islamabad's. In the average income category, Islamabad is also ahead of
    Colombo (only $ 216), Delhi ($ 2,944), Kathmandu ($ 2,091), Chittagong
    ($ 1,820) and Dacca ($ 1,820).

    Islamabad is also way ahead of Delhi, Bombay, Kathmandu, Chittagong and
    Dhaka in per-capita state spending on education. The figure for
    Islamabad is $ 74.72 per capita versus only $ 0.99 per capita for Delhi,
    $ 11.70 per capita for Bombay, $ 32.67 per capita for Kathmandu, $ 1.56
    per capita for Chittagong and $ 1.56 per capita for Dhaka. That means
    that state spending on education per capita in Islamabad is 75 times
    higher than in Delhi and more than 6 times higher than in Bombay.

    Islamabad is also well ahead of Bangalore and Bombay in the number of TV
    sets per 1,000 people. The figure for Islamabad is 100 TV sets per 1,000
    people, as against 80 sets per 1,000 people for Bangalore and 77 sets
    per 1,000 people for Bombay. Karachi, too, has 100 TV sets per 1,000
    people.

    Fukuoka, in Japan, and Tokyo are the top-ranked key cities in Asia, both
    scoring 73 points in the Asiaweek rankings. Tokyo has improved its
    ranking by three places from last year, when it was ranked 4th.
    Singapore is ranked 3rd (72 points); and Osaka and Taipei are co-ranked
    4th (71 points). Hong Kong (70 points) is ranked 6th, up three places
    from last year. Bandar Seri Begawan and Kuala Lumpur are co-ranked 7th
    (69 points); George Town 9th (68 points); Pusan and Seoul are co-ranked
    10th (63 points); Kaoshiung 12th (62 points); and Chiangmai 13th (59
    points).

    Macau , a former Portugese colony which reverted to China in 1999, has
    jumped ten places in the rankings, from 24th place last year to 14th
    this year (58 points) - the biggest gain for any city in the survey.
    Shanghai, on the other hand, has dropped six places, from 9th place last
    year to 15th this year (58 points). Beijing is up one place, from 17th
    place last year to 16th this year (56 points). Bangkok is down four
    places, from 13th place last year to co-ranked 17th this year with Davao
    City, Hanoi, Ho Chi Minh City and Kuching (55 points). Cebu City is
    ranked 22nd (54 points); and Guangzhou 23rd (53 points).

    As mentioned above, Islamabad is ranked 24th (51 points). Manila is
    ranked 25th (50 points); Bandung 26th (48 points); Bangalore 27th (45
    points); and Jakarta 28th (44 points). Colombo is down eight places,
    from 21st place last year to 29th this year (43 points). Chongoing,
    Delhi and Pnom Penh are co-ranked 29th (43 points). Bombay has jumped
    seven places, from 40th place last year to 33rd this year (40 points).
    Kathmandu is ranked 34th (39 points); Surabaya 35th (38 points); Yangon
    36th (37 points); and Chittagong and Karachi are co-ranked 37th (36
    points). Dhaka is ranked 39th (34 points), while Vientiane, the capital
    of Laos, is ranked 40th, with only 7 points.

    Old Tokyo is undergoing a renaissance, says the Asiaweek report. The
    report says crafts people, designers and other professionals are
    discovering the pleasures of living in a neighbourhood that still
    retains much of its heritage. "It's funny, but traditional Japanese
    culture is fresh to young people in Tokyo. They've grown up surrounded
    by new, mostly Western things. Rediscovering old Tokyo has become
    fashionable," Itoh Takao, a fifth-generation Edokko, or Tokyo native,
    was quoted as saying.

    In a number of Asia's most livable cities, "a love affair with the past
    is in full swing," says the Asiaweek report. It says conservationists
    can hardly believe how things have changed. For decades, anyone
    campaigning to preserve a community's links with the past was routinely
    dismissed as a sentimentalist, or worse, condemned as being against
    progress, says the report.

    As the report notes, urban preservation cane low on the list of
    priorities of governments scrambling to build modern nations. After
    spending budgets on better infrastructure and social programmes, there
    was often little left for restoration work. And with big fortunes to be
    made in real estate, old neighbourhoods were razed to make way for
    characterless high-rises. Highways rolled out across cityscapes. It took
    the economic crisis of the late 1990s to slow the relentless march of
    glass and concrete blocks in Asia, says the report.

    In major cities, economic pressures mean conservationists have a far
    tougher fight to preserve traditional cores. Road improvements, too,
    exact their price. One likely victim, according to the report, is the
    Jim Thompson House in Bangkok, named after the man who put Thai silk on
    the world map. The complex of half a dozen traditional wooden homes was
    relocated from the ancient city of Ayuthaya during the 1950s and has
    since become a cultural icon. "But plans to construct an expressway
    through the district where the property stands spell its demise," says
    the report.

    The good news is that awareness of heritage issues is growing among
    Asia's city governments. That, however, is clearly not the case in
    cities like Karachi and Dhaka where city governments are often in
    cahoots with unscrupulous real estate developers and turn a blind eye to
    their tearing down old buildings to make way for concrete monstrosities.

    NEWSWORLD

    -

    Comment


      #3
      Transferred to Pakistan Affairs.

      Comment


        #4
        It's such a boring city..not to mention rude people who live there
        Lahore is way better.
        That was my personal opinion

        ------------------
        Who says nothing is impossible? I've been doing nothing all my life!

        Comment


          #5
          Islamabad is extremely boring!!!!

          ------------------
          CROIRE A L'INCROYABLE
          You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

          Comment


            #6
            Hey,you could use the PR from such publications.I doubt i 'll ever go to Islamabad either,but somthing to make some neigbour feel bad ,that they are not.LOL he he he

            Being a hip town for youngsters like n.y. karachi ,mumai is different ,they look at amenities & i know u want young crowd ,restaurant hangouts,university ambiance ,but thats not we are talking about.You 'll need after u r married with 21/2 kid & no time to party.!!

            Comment


              #7
              Not suprised at all,Islamabad is definitely the best city in South Asia.

              Hopefully next time it's on the top of the list

              And hey don't say another about my city, warna.....

              [This message has been edited by kaki#1 (edited December 12, 2000).]

              Comment

              Working...
              X