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Pak history of Bangladesh war misses out the SURRENDER part

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    Pak history of Bangladesh war misses out the SURRENDER part


    The official Pakistani history of the Bangladesh war does not mention the surrender of its Eastern Command along with 91,000 personnel at Dhaka on December 16, 1971. In fact, the narrative, written by Maj Gen Shaukat Riza and published in the late 1980s, simply peters out around December 13-14. The tone and tenor of the book is summed up in the foreword which says that, "We blundered into military action in East Pakistan on wrong premise i.e. the bulk of East Pakistanis were on our side... we failed to appreciate the Indian reaction in all its dimensions".

    So truncated is Riza's account of the war that he does not do justice to many of the smaller Pakistani units that fought hard -- and often to the end --against a much superior enemy. Among the actions that he glosses over is the ambush of a company of 22 Rajput Regiment and a tank unit in Kusthia town. Though a relatively minor action, in the context of the larger war, this event was to have portentous consequences. The commander of the Indian Army's II Corps, Lt-Gen T N Raina, ordered the 4 Mountain Division to halt its advance to Faridpur and the ferry at Golaundo Ghat leading to Dhaka, and move northwards to Kusthia, where the Pakistanis had already cleared out after blowing a span of the Hardinge Bridge.

    But Riza's account does bring out the desperate attempts by the Pakistani commanders to create a worthwhile strategy to deal with the East Pakistani revolt. Riza himself commanded the 9 Division headquartered in Jessore for a brief period during June 1971. This is the same formation that came apart at the beginning of the war on December 7 when one of its brigades headed north to Kusthia and the other to Khulna, leaving the way open for the Indian Army's 4 Moutain Division to move to Faridpur that would have taken them to Dhaka. That the Indian commanders failed to see this opportunity is another story.

    Needless to say, Riza does not mention anything about the atrocities committed by the Pakistani forces in suppressing the East Pakistani revolt. According to the Indian official history, some 50,000 persons had been butchered in the crackdown of March 25, 1971. Some of the principal targets were students and faculty of Dacca University. Pakistani forces did not hesitate to use air-strikes, artillery and tanks to attack population centres around Dhaka. In subsequent fighting anything up to a million civilians and former East Pakistani Army personnel were killed in the March-December period.

    Not surprisingly, Riza's history dwells in more detail on the events in the West where the Pakistan Army fared better. But this was only so in a relative sense of the term. The Pakistanis lost ground in north Kashmir. Their ambitious offensive to capture Poonch failed. Even the Chamb offensive that took the Indian forces by surprise made, at best, limited gains. It was not even able to match the success of what Maj Gen Akhtar Hussain Malik's identical 1965 attack achieved. Its attack towards Jaisalmer, daring enough that it was, became a fiasco at Longewala. The only consolation for Pakistan was that despite a favourable situation, the Indian performance just about matched theirs.


    #2
    So, you guys still think you won the 1965 war!!!!
    Even though your govt says YOU LOST!!!!!!!!!!!!

    ------------------
    CROIRE A L'INCROYABLE
    You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

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      #3
      Chilli are you our old friend Mohabbat by the way?

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        #4
        Did I ask you if u were a mental case ?

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          #5
          You can if you want and I will to give you a mentally-balanced answer to the best of my mental abilities

          But please tell us are you Mohabbat or Mohabbat2 or a relation of Mohabbat's?

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