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Can Pakistan Run Away From shadow of India??

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    Can Pakistan Run Away From shadow of India??


    Spell of Hindi on Pakistanis
    Muzaffar Hussain

    When the last time Atal Behari Vajpayee spoke in the United Nations
    General Assembly in Hindi, there was a great uproar raised by the
    self-proclaimed intellectuals and other sundry anglophiles including the
    parasitical among the English journalists, objecting to the great
    expenses it involved to the Indian Government. This time when the Prime
    Minister spoke in Hindi at the august house, the anglopholes were
    nowhere to be heard. Similar is this predicament of the Pakistanis who
    are allergic to anything even remotely associated with word Hindu, as
    also the language Hindi. Since they set their separate house after
    Partition, they try their level best to disabuse their masses of their
    age-old vocabulary full of Hindi words. Thus if fly to Pakistan and ride
    a taxicab from Karachi's Mohammed Ali Jinnah International Airport to
    enter the city then you cannot miss the hoardings on either side of the
    road. Most of them no doubt proclaim the niceties of the wares they
    advertise. But there are smaller boards which publicize government
    organised schemes or programmes. Many of them dilate on the literacy
    campaign or the environment awareness movement lanuched by the
    government.

    On one such was printed Ped pragati ki nishani hai (Tree is a sign of
    progress) another said Ped qudrat ki sampatti hai (Tree is the wealth of
    Nature). When the Pakistan, who never tire of condemning Hindi, Hindu,
    Hindustan all the twenty-four hours of the day, use words like pragati
    (progress) or sampatti (wealth), one wonders why the Urdu equivalents
    like tarakki and daulat have not been used in a country whose declared
    national language is Urdu! Does the Pakistani government not know that
    the country, against which it is busy planning all sorts of incursions,
    has Hindi as its national language? And that the Pakistanis are merrily
    using Hindi expressions without any hesitation. There is no answer to
    this question either with the Urdu enthusiasts in Pakistan or to their
    Indian counterparts who never tire of maligning Hindi language. And the
    fact of the matter is that the magic of Hindi language does not
    recognize man-made artificial barriers, and its fascination influences
    not only its friends but its enemies also.

    If we painstakingly analyse the releases of the Pakistani print and
    electronic media we cannot escape the conclusion that scores of chaste
    Hindi expressions are used without even a dropping of an eyelid. If one
    enters the Pakistani market place one is struck with the typically
    Indian expressions the merchants and the shoppers use without even being
    aware that they are paying an unintended tribute to their "congenital"
    adversaries. When a Pakistani loses his temper he easily lapses into
    Hindi expletives as a duck takes to water, and one is surprised to find
    echoes of Inidan gestures accompanying them. The same sala, gadha and
    suar are interspersed with other much more racy rebukes, all reflecting
    the similar racy reproaches one hears in Indian verbal bouts. Bhai is
    more often used than biradar. A Pakistani of Hyderabad or Lucknow origin
    would suffix it with jan as bhaijan, bhabhijan, etc. But there are some
    Hindi words the Pakistanis cannot do without. They are prem, dakghar,
    bhaiya, dam, ghar, roti, jivan, ghati, dharati, mol, tol, nai, dhobi,
    pinjara, dhandha, etc. Some of the days of a week also are described in
    Hindi: Somvar, Mangalvar and Budhvar. The largest-circulation daily
    Nava-i-Waqt gives Hindi month names and their tithis along with months
    and dates of Gregorian and Arabic calendars.

    Strangely the Urdu newspapers not only use janab as Urdu counterpart of
    Mr, but they also style some persons as Shri. And while mentioning Atal
    Behari Vajpayee they even use Shriman and Sonia Gandhi is Shrimati Sonia
    Gandhi. Do they not know that the term Shri is not only a Hindi
    equivalent of Mr but it also means one of the deities of the Hindus?
    When those who day in and day out condemn Hindu deities do not shy away
    from using words that mean Hindu gods or goddesses, it can only be
    considered a magic spell of Hindi. Hindi and Urdu are quite similar, in
    fact if Urdu is written in the Devanagari script of Hindi it no longer
    remains Urdu, it becomes Hindi. The spoken language and its grammar is
    the same in both. But as the very formation of Pakistan was unnatural,
    there came a very deliberate attempt, an unnatural exercise, to weed out
    all the Hindi words from Urdu. Even the words of dialects such as Braj
    Avadhi, Bhojpuri, Malvi, etc. But like all unnatural schemes this koo
    was bound to fail. Because the masses could not be made to purge their
    common speech of all these "foreign" words. It was most ironic. Because
    all these dialects are part of the soil from ages. It was only after the
    eighth century that the Arabic and Persian words began to trickle down
    into the speech of the masses after the Muslim invaders began their
    inroads into the subcontinent.

    Therefore, truly speaking, the Arabic and Persian words can be termed as
    "foreign" to the subcontinent. While the words of Braj, Bhojpuri, Avadhi
    or Malvi are indeed very much indigenous. The Pakistanis along with
    their Hindi-baiter Indian cousin should shun the Arabic or Persian words
    if at all they are so averse to "foreign" words. But blind dogma can
    never be countered with reason. This chauvinism went to such an extent
    that the Pakistanis began saying Allah Hafiz when they realised that
    Khuda in Khuda Hafiz hails from Iranian culture, which today belongs to
    the Shias of Iran, a bete noire for all Sunnis. Thus the Pakistanis'
    inability to do away with Hindi words from their "living speech is an
    indication that Hindi indeed is a natural speech, a "living speech" of
    the subcontinent. What keeps Hindi and Urdu apart is the "left-going"
    script of Urdu. If this dividing factor is removed then Pakistan has
    forty million Hindi-speaking population. Pakistani schools do not teach
    Hindi. But it is part of the "Indian studies". At one time Lahore
    University had courses in Hindi up to post graduate level.

    But now in Pakistan only Karachi University has provision of Hindi
    studies. In the Karachi University building under the picture of Panini
    on the wall his name is given in English, Urdu and also Hindi. Pakistan
    proudly mentions Panini as its national hero. Many postal stamps sport
    Panini's pictures. The Hindi-lover in Pakistan Dr Shahida Habib says
    that if the Pakistanis intend to counter Indians in the field of
    ideology and thinking, Pakistanis will have to learn Hindi. In the Dayal
    Library in Lahore there are some 14,000 Hindi titles. Many Sanskrit
    manuscripts are lying there gathering dust of ages. Many people from
    Uttar Pradesh and Bihar had migrated to Pakistan. They now even read
    poems by Ghalib and other Urdu stalwarts in Devnagari script published
    by Rajpal Publishing Co. Shahila Habib follows Ahmedia sect. Some years
    back when she visited Qadiyan in Gurdaspur district, she expressed her
    desire to translate in Urdu, Dinkar's Sanskriti ke Char adhyay. Hindi
    people are in the forefront in politicizing a language. They organise
    world Hindi conventions in Fiji, Trinidad and Mauritius. But when people
    of Indian origin are threatened in Fiji, these Hindi lovers cannot spare
    a word of sympathy for these overseas brothers. This apathy of
    Hindi-speaking people is the biggest impediment in the development of
    the languag

    ------------------


    #2
    What are you trying to say ?
    That all Hindi speaking people are one nation ?
    I don't agree.There are 14 main languages alone in India, not to speak of sub dialects ?
    If you are saying there is 'Pure' Hindi you are wrong again.
    AS for the Allah Hafeez business, it is hilarious.
    I don't think Pakistanis started it because of Iranians.
    They started it because Khuda means God for both Hindus and Muslims
    Finally I always found Urdu pleasing on ears.
    Sanskritised Hindi is unnatural because Sanskrit never was a living language.
    Believe me, I grew up learning Sanskrit.It is like Latin.

    Comment


      #3
      Urdo is different to hindi because of so many words of turkish, mongol, persian and arabic in it.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Azad Munna:

        But now in Pakistan only Karachi University has provision of Hindi
        studies. In the Karachi University building under the picture of Panini
        on the wall his name is given in English, Urdu and also Hindi. Pakistan
        proudly mentions Panini as its national hero. Many postal stamps sport
        Panini's pictures. The Hindi-lover in Pakistan Dr Shahida Habib says
        that if the Pakistanis intend to counter Indians in the field of
        ideology and thinking, Pakistanis will have to learn Hindi. In the Dayal
        Library in Lahore there are some 14,000 Hindi titles.

        A most interesting post. But I personally find URDU a very rich and "charming" language and I don't know why the present generation Pakis should fall prey to Hindi.May be due to over-exposure to the "Hindi" media ...

        Comment


          #5
          persian and hindi is members of same family
          of languages

          Comment

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