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38pc Pakistan adults prefer to settle abroad

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Also in the same study Gallup Pakistan found out that 90% of pakistani are proud to identify themselves as pakistanis.

    Leave a comment:


  • PJ
    replied
    Indians outnumber Pakistanis two to 1 in
    asylem applications, in the uk.

    Leave a comment:


  • CM
    replied
    Fine chilli my bad.
    Lets discuss pakistan on its own.
    Yes it is true.
    But the Govt is doing its best.
    Most of the problems have occured during the "democratic rule".
    Did you know that at the end of Zia's rule, in 1989 2 years after he had died, the exchange rate with the dollar was 12 to 1.
    That is with all the aid debt as well.
    The US provide all help on aid.
    Meaning it had to be paid back.

    Pakistan is in a weak position, but the people are more do want to move, but can't.
    Every tom dick and harry wants to move the US.
    Half of them don't know where the US is.
    That adds to the 38% - many of them from rural areas, and thinl the US is the heaven on earth.
    While 72% do not wish to leave.
    Means the CE is doing a good job.

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    CROIRE A L'INCROYABLE

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  • chilli
    replied
    That report was from Khaleej Times and has got nothing to do with India.
    The refernece to the migration of Indian IT experts is totally out-of-context and uncalled for.It does not justify anything !!

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  • CM
    replied
    Lets take indian figures.
    In the next 2 years, Indian will have more IT experts out of the country than actually in the country.
    Also Sajjadm the same is for india.
    I will bet my money on it.

    ------------------
    CROIRE A L'INCROYABLE

    Leave a comment:


  • sajjadm
    started a topic 38pc Pakistan adults prefer to settle abroad

    38pc Pakistan adults prefer to settle abroad

    http://www.khaleejtimes.com/subcont.htm#story1

    From our correspondent
    ISLAMABAD - There has been a continuous brain drain from the country over the past one decade, and a survey report released here says that nearly two thirds of those still living in the country would prefer to go abroad for work. Still alarming is the revelation that 38 per cent of adults would like to go abroad not only for better job prospects; they would prefer to permanently settle outside the country.

    The report of an opinion survey released by Gallup-Pakistan, an affiliate of Gallup International, yesterday says that this marked increase in the number of people thinking of going broad is primarily because of their diminishing confidence in the country's economic future.

    According to the report, 38 per cent of a national sample of adults said they would like to permanently settle abroad if such an option was available.

    "This is more than twice as many as those who expressed such a desire in a comparable survey by Gallup in 1984, when only 17 per cent gave this response," says the report.

    According to Gallup-Pakistan, the survey was carried out in October and it asked a series of questions regarding working abroad and reasons underlying people's desire to migrate.

    The survey was conducted among more than 1,500 statistically selected households in both rural and urban areas in the four provinces of the country, comprising a cross-section of people with varying income, educational and linguistic backgrounds.

    According to the report, nearly two-third of the respondents - 62 per cent - said they would like to work abroad. Out of them 38 per cent said they would like to settle outside the country. Comparable figures in a similar survey conducted 15 years ago were 49 per cent for working abroad and 17 per cent for settling overseas.

    The survey also shows that nearly five per cent of households in Pakistan have at least one person of their immediate family members settled abroad.

    These households were asked to give reasons which led to their kin to leave the country. The report says that 70 per cent cited better economic prospects while 12 per cent said their kin were not motivated to go abroad for immediate economic benefits, but out of fear of poor "future economic prospects of the country".

    Another six per cent cited poor law and order situation in Pakistan as the reason for their kin to leave the country, while the remaining 12 per cent cited miscellaneous reasons.

    Analysts at Gallup have linked the rising migration levels to two principal causes.

    Firstly, a declining hope in the country's economic future. They pointed out that in 1986, 72 per cent of the respondents to the survey agreed with the statement that "Pakistan will make tremendous progress in the next 10 years".

    The report went on to state that now this figure has dropped to 54 per cent.

    Secondly, the Gallup report says, new technologies have facilitated globalisation and constant telecom links.

    Moreover, small communities of Pakistanis and Muslims have developed in countries of immigration.

    But despite this growing trend to seek jobs outside the country, or to try to settle abroad, nearly 90 per cent of the people interviewed for the survey said they still took pride in being citizens of Pakistan.

    According to the report, two per cent said it was not a matter of pride, and one per cent went to the extent of saying that they felt ashamed of calling themselves Pakistanis.

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    Why not? when they are suffering economically and the CE is busy touring the world on the country's expense. what will the poor people do.
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