Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Is Inidan Media aware of ground realities in PAKISTAN.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Is Inidan Media aware of ground realities in PAKISTAN.

    Pakistan's future bleak under Musharraf
    By Mahendra Ved
    NEW DELHI: Completing a year in office next Thursday, Chief Executive Gen Pervez Musharraf is "merely surviving," using "carrot and stick" tactics at home. He hopes to benefit from a fear widespread in the world community that unless kept "engaged", through IMF and World Bank doles if need be, Pakistan may disintegrate.
    This is the harsh conclusion of many of India's Pakistan watchers used to scrutinising long periods of military rule in the neighbourhood. They do not think democracy would be restored under Musharraf and are surprised that his promises and announcements are being taken seriously in the Western quarters. It could be prolonged military rule, either under Musharraf or another general who might remove him, they say.
    While it is desirable for neighbours to talk, "there is nothing you can talk at this moment," noted defence analyst Major Gen (rtd) Afsar Karim told TOINS. Former foreign secretary S K Singh urged India to redefine the term "ceasefire" to mean that Pakistan must first end intrusion before any dialogue can be started.
    Former prime minister I K Gujral lamented that the "intimate embrace" of the Taliban and the fundamentalists had taken Pakistan away from the civilised societies. "Sustenance and abetment of terrorism is a double-edged weapon," he warned, adding "I wish people of Pakistan happier times."
    Karim said Musharraf's "PR exercise" at the UN lacked conviction. His drive against corruption looks more like political vendetta, since military officers are not being touched. His placing retired generals in jobs civilians generally do has only made the public think that he is "interfering without being effective."
    Savita Pande, associate professor at JNU's School of International Studies, said: "His good fortune is a good cotton crop". She ridiculed Musharraf's bid to change the political system. Attempts by Ayub Khan and Ziaul Haq had only damaged the polity. Keeping out political parties in elections would not work because Pakistan's not an apolitical society, she observed.
    Musharraf's advent was different from previous military rulers as it was widely welcomed with even sweets distributed, she noted. But "the euphoria has evaporated," said Gujral. He cannot keep the army and the bureaucracy happy for too long, given the economic conditions, Pande said.
    Gujral said: "It is for the people of Pakistan to decide whether they think the army rule has served them better than the previous regime." He had last year said that the Kargil debacle and the Taliban pressures had prompted Musharraf to remove Nawaz Sharif.
    Singh noted that Musharraf has been "obstinate" in his ties with the Taliban and Saudi dissident Osama bin Laden, defying US pressure, because of domestic compulsions. His effort to discipline the trade and industry also were rolled back "once it became clear that the bazaar elements and ulemas are hand in gloves."
    Thanks to the Taliban-Laden factor, Musharraf would continue to be suspected by his two main benefactors --the US, for whom capturing Laden is of paramount importance and China, which finds Musharraf unable to prevent the Taliban from training and arming the Uyghour rebels of Xinjiang province, Singh said.

    #2
    The point I want to make by posting this article is that in this article The Times of India is assessing Pakistan's domestic situation by presenting opionions of former Indian Political and Military leaders.
    An independent newspaper would get opnions of people who are directly affected or people who have nothing to gain and are truly independent.

    Comment


      #3
      Byousaf thanks for posting this quite biased article. But off it goes to the Pakistan Affairs forum!

      Comment

      Working...
      X