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    Pakistan bans two Afghan TV channels

    Pakistan bans two Afghan TV channels for using “poisonous language”
    (AP)

    16 March 2006

    http://www.khaleejtimes.com/DisplayA...n=subcontinent

    QUETTA, Pakistan - Pakistan on Thursday banned two Afghan TV channels and stopped cable operators from airing their content because they had blamed Pakistani security forces for trying to kill an Afghan politician, an official said.


    The ban was the latest blow in a war of words between Pakistan and Afghanistan amid an increase of Islamic extremist and tribal violence on both sides of these troubled neighbors’ borders.

    The Tolo TV and Ariana TV stations were barred from operating in Pakistan because they “were involved in negative propaganda against Pakistan,” said Abdul Jalal Khan, an official with the state-run Pakistan Media Regulatory Authority that supervises cable and television channels.

    “They used poisonous, undiplomatic language against Pakistan in their programs,” Khan said from Quetta, capital of the southwestern Baluchistan province where many Afghan refugees live.

    The stations stopped airing in Quetta on Thursday, said Khan, who accused both stations of blaming Pakistan’s spy network for a March 12 suicide attack against a senior Afghan political figure in the Afghan capital Kabul. The official lived, but four people were killed. Islamabad has rejected claims of involvement.

    Privately run Tolo issued a statement condemning the banning, saying “it always attempted to present balanced stories on national, regional and international issues.”

    “We are alarmed at news that TOLO has been banned in Baluchistan province as our station is very popular in the province,” the statement said, adding the Pakistani Embassy in the Afghan capital, Kabul, rejected overtures to discuss the ban.

    Mohammed Shahid, a spokesman for the regulatory authority in the capital, Islamabad, declined to confirm the ban, but said the Afghan stations had not applied for permission to broadcast their programs in Pakistan.

    The ban follows tension between them over the issue of cross border terrorism with Kabul saying militants were sheltering in Pakistan, a charge Islamabad denies.
    Don't tell me any of your secrets...even if i am asking you...i would never keep it a secret.

    #2
    Re: Pakistan bans two Afghan TV channels

    Well done. Afghanistan and its tribal drug lords need to know that this BS is not tolerated.

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Pakistan bans two Afghan TV channels

      It seems as though Pakistan and Afghanistan are officially at war.

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Pakistan bans two Afghan TV channels

        They always are

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Pakistan bans two Afghan TV channels

          Yeah that is what happens when you have Afghanistan as a satillete state of the US.

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Pakistan bans two Afghan TV channels

            http://www.voanews.com/english/2006-03-20-voa43.cfm
            Afghanistan's foreign minister says there are Taleban training camps across the border in Pakistan that are sources of terrorism and instability inside his country. Abdullah made his remarks during a speech in Washington.


            Foreign Minister Abdullah says pro-Taleban militants continue to train and hide in Pakistan's tribal areas, and cross the border to launch attacks inside Afghanistan.

            "On the security field, we need to work more together," he said. "Everybody believes that there are some training camps there. Those are not doing well for anybody. Those are sources of instability and terror."

            The Afghan foreign minister called on Islamabad to cooperate more in an effort to eradicate extremists he says are a threat to the region.

            "If we all know that the leaders of the Taleban are there, they are actively acting behind what is happening in Afghanistan, we know it is hurting us to begin with, but it will have implications for all of us in the region," he said.

            Pakistan has repeatedly targeted militants along the Afghan border and has deployed 80,000 troops in the area.

            Senior Taleban fugitives and al-Qaida terrorist leader Osama bin Laden are believed to be hiding in the tribal areas.

            Afghan officials have previously accused Pakistan of not doing enough to stop militants from using Pakistani territory to launch attacks on Afghanistan. Earlier this month, Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf angrily rejected the allegations and accused what he called "some agents" in Afghanistan of attempting to malign Pakistan.

            On his recent trip to South Asia, where he stopped in both Afghanistan and Pakistan, President Bush noted both countries are involved in efforts to catch bin Laden and his associates.

            U.S. military officials have linked violence in Afghanistan with that country's drug trade.

            Afghanistan produces 90 percent of the world's opium, and Foreign Minister Abdullah says controlling illegal drugs is a major problem for his government.

            "Narcotics, it is a big challenge for Afghanistan," he said. "It is a challenge for humanity. All these are areas that Afghans are determined to move forward on, and to overcome these challenges."

            After his speech, Abdullah held talks with Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, who says the country has made major gains since the Taleban regime was ousted more than four years ago.

            "Everyone is impressed with the spirit of the Afghan people and with all that you have accomplished," she said. "I just want to thank you for being here and for the great partnership that you provide."

            Foreign Minister Abdullah says three-and-a-half million Afghan refugees, who fled decades of war have returned to their country, something he says is a strong vote of confidence in Afghanistan's future
            Don't tell me any of your secrets...even if i am asking you...i would never keep it a secret.

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Pakistan bans two Afghan TV channels

              I want to ask the FO how much money he is earning from poppy production this year.

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Pakistan bans two Afghan TV channels

                Look, terrorism by the way of islamic fundamentalism is like a ginn which pakistan have ripped for years and now it is buring pakistan itself

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Pakistan bans two Afghan TV channels

                  Originally posted by Grumpy
                  Yeah that is what happens when you have Afghanistan as a satillete state of the US.
                  Pakistan only helped US to conquer afghanistan. US has praised pakistan so many times as trusted ally on war on terror. now what happened?

                  Pakistan have helped US to irradicate taliban from afghanistan. May allah save pakistan from taliban and their other radical outlets.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Pakistan bans two Afghan TV channels

                    Don't worry as taliban will make a comeback once US is gone!

                    there is no other alternatives that pashtuns have.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Pakistan bans two Afghan TV channels

                      Navtech when you know something about the situation please come back and discuss it. Till then don't waste my time with BS. Firstly the US set up the Taliban. Funded them, as did the Saudis and 90% of the Islamic world. While India funded the NA. Yes they funded them.

                      You had your own hand in the mess that is Afghanistan.

                      Navtech unlike India we do not let racist parties win elections. Ones that are responsible for massacres like Gujrat.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: Pakistan bans two Afghan TV channels

                        grumpy u seem to be what ur nick says.
                        where did he say anything about gujarat and massacares and things like that..
                        How many muslims did pakistan massacre.. tell me.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: Pakistan bans two Afghan TV channels

                          afghanistan has every reason to complain.. pakistan has been ruining that nation from the word go.....

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: Pakistan bans two Afghan TV channels

                            Originally posted by vineshvk
                            grumpy u seem to be what ur nick says.
                            where did he say anything about gujarat and massacares and things like that..
                            How many muslims did pakistan massacre.. tell me.
                            None. But lets stick to the subject, victim of an escaped brain.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Re: Pakistan bans two Afghan TV channels

                              Border Battles Strain Pakistan-Afghan Ties By PAUL GARWOOD, Associated Press Writer
                              http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060322/...ghan_tension_1
                              ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Raging violence along the rugged Pakistan-Afghan border has sent relations between the two countries to new lows and underscored U.S. difficulties in containing a troubled region crucial to winning the war on terror.


                              The tensions are placing increasing pressure on Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, a U.S. counterterror ally who has been forced to defend his government against claims by Afghan President Hamid Karzai that Pakistan hasn't been doing enough to stem the flow of militants into Afghanistan.

                              "If the violence in Afghanistan escalates in the spring, then I think we are going to see this relationship become even more tense," said Samina Ahmed, an Islamabad-based expert with the International Crisis Group. "And Pakistanis are really concerned about how this affects their relations with the Americans."

                              Marine Gen. Peter Pace, chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, met Pakistani officials in Islamabad on Monday and Tuesday and discussed terrorist incursions into Afghanistan, a senior U.S. defense official said on condition of anonymity because the talks were private. His visit followed one earlier in the month by Gen. John Abizaid, chief of the U.S. Central Command.

                              More than four years after the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan, an intensifying campaign of bombings, including 30 suicide attacks since the fall, have targeted foreign troops, Afghan security forces and local authorities. Afghan officials claim the attackers operate out of Pakistan.

                              In addition, insecurity only appears to be growing along the mountainous border, where Osama bin Laden and other al-Qaida and Taliban leaders are believed to be hiding. In the past month, Pakistani forces have fought several battles with pro-Taliban militants in the tribal region of North Waziristan, leaving scores of soldiers and many more suspected militants dead.

                              On Tuesday, Afghan security forces killed at least 15 suspected Taliban rebels after they crossed the border from neighboring Pakistan, said Abdul Razak, the Afghan frontier security commander. Among them was a midlevel Taliban commander, Mullah Shien, whose followers regularly attacked foreign and Afghan troops and bomb trucks hauling gasoline for the U.S.-led coalition, Razak said.

                              But Pakistani Information Minister Sheikh Rashid Ahmed denied the militants came from Pakistan. "It's nonsense: just another allegation. We have our security forces there who are guarding the border," he said.

                              Such disputes have raised serious doubts about whether the two governments can work together to fight Islamic militants, let alone track down bin Laden and his associates.

                              "What the U.S. is trying to do is encourage Afghanistan and Pakistan to have the best possible relationship," said Teresita Schaffer, director of the South Asia program at the Washington-based Center for Strategic and International Studies. "But it seems that President Bush hadn't realized the sensitive nature of Pakistan-Afghan relations."

                              Both Afghanistan and Pakistan became top U.S. allies in the war on terror after the 2001 invasion that ousted Afghanistan's Taliban regime. But the two countries have never shaken off mutual distrust over Pakistan's former support of the Taliban.

                              Last month, Karzai presented Pakistan with locations of alleged terrorist training camps and a list of extremists his government says are at large inside Pakistan.

                              When Afghan officials then leaked details of the intelligence, Musharraf was outraged. He accused Karzai in a televised interview of providing outdated information and not doing enough to stop militants entering Pakistan in the first place.

                              "With Karzai and Musharraf going at it, nobody can back down without losing face," said Patrick Cronin, an Asia-U.S. expert for the Center for Strategic and International Studies. "It is important these disagreements be dealt with at lower levels. Their own survival is at stake and these countries are at the front line of the struggle against terror."

                              Afghan and U.S. officials acknowledge that Musharraf has been trying to contain militants in the lawless border regions. But the Bush administration is also urging Pakistan to do more.

                              Diplomatic pressure on Musharraf could grow as NATO expands its peacekeeping operation into southern Afghanistan, bringing the forces of more nations under threat of attack.
                              Don't tell me any of your secrets...even if i am asking you...i would never keep it a secret.

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