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    Indonesia to buy supercomputer from India instead of US.

    India is likely to finalise the sale of locally built supercomputer to Indonesia during President Abdurrahman Wahid's visit next week. There has been growing interest in the international trade community for Indian supercomputers. Traditionally US has been a major player in the trade of super computers.

    "We have been holding talks with Indonesia since 1998," said R.K. Arora, chief of the state-owned Centre for Development of Advanced Computing which has built and so far sold two supercomputers to Singapore and Russia.

    "We expect to sign the agreement when the delegation headed by President Wahid comes to India," Arora told, adding the equipment could cost 100 million rupees (2.3 million dollars).

    The Indian supercomputer could be used in seismic data processing, weather forecasting, geomatrics, biotechnology, power and telecommunications.

    India hopes the two-day state visit by Wahid, to begin February 8, would open a new chapter in warming bilateral relations.

    Wahid will meet President K.R. Narayanan, Vice President Krishan Kant, Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee and other leaders.

    His visit comes four years after then Indonesian president Suharto visited India in 1995.

    Some 70 Indonesian businessmen will accompany Wahid for talks to bolster trade between India and Indonesia.

    Australia, Egypt, Brazil and Malaysia have also shown interest in buying Indian supercomputers. A West Australian trade delegation headed by Commerce and Trade Minister Hendy Cowan and comprising representatives from 14 private sector organisations will also be travelling to India.

    The five-day Australian mission was aimed at building trade and investment links with India, WA's 10th largest export market, a spokesman for Mr Cowan said.

    The state's exports to India were valued at $A431 million ($US274.2 million) in 1998-99.



    [This message has been edited by mohabbat (edited February 07, 2000).]

    #2
    Despite whipping India for the past 52 years in every OIC , Commonwealth and UN meeting,
    by playing the Islamic card on Kashmir issue, Pakistan has failed to isolate the second largest Muslim country India with other OIC members. In the past Pakistan has strongly opposed India's admittance to OIC (Organisation of Islamic countries). Islamic countries like Egypt, Indonesia, Bangladesh,
    Malaysia and Turkey are keen to improve their ties with India. So has Pakistan failed in it's foreign policy
    or Economics/Business plays a far more important role than religion. After all India is a much bigger market than Pakistan!

    -- Related story
    Indonesian president urges close alliance with India, Russia and China

    Indonesian President Abdurrahman Wahid Wednesday urged India, Russia and China to form a trade grouping with his country to stay afloat in world business.
    "In order to stay strongly in the world market, we have to develop the so-called close alliance with China, Russia, India and Indonesia. This will be important for us in the long run," Wahid told the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry, without giving further details.
    Wahid said his two-day visit to India was "too-short" but stressed his extended Europe-Asia tour was important for Jakarta.
    "We would like to stress our interest for dialogue with many countries for the possibility of expanding investment ... and preserving the territorial integrity of Indonesia."
    Wahid underlined India's historic links with Indonesia and said one-third of the Indonesian language was derived from Sanskrit.
    "My belief that India and Indonesia can go a long way economically, culturally and politically is vindicated now," he said, referring to the "warm welcome" accorded to him here.
    The president also witnessed the signing of an agreement on trade cooperation between India's state-owned Mining and Metallurgical Trading Corp. and the Indonesian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, and another pact on joint railway projects in Indonesia.
    Indonesian Industry and Trade Minister Yusuf Kalla, meanwhile, told the meeting Indian businessmen should not be fazed by political, economic and social turmoil in Indonesia.
    He also urged India to step up investments in Indonesia, saying the current level of bilateral trade, fluctuating around one billion dollars, was well below the potential.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    India signed a series of pacts with the Indonesian government and companies to expand business ties in Southeast Asia, the government said.
    Abdurrahman Wahid, Indonesia's first democratically elected President in three decades, who concluded a two-day visit to India, witnessed the inking of an agreement between MMTC Ltd. -- India's biggest trading company -- and Kadin, Indonesia's main business association. The aim is to ``multiply'' trade between two former allies of the Non-Aligned Movement.
    Since the end of the Cold War, India has drifted away from countries formed out of the Soviet Union and moved to strengthen ties with Europe, the U.S. and other countries in Asia. Last year, it became a full-fledged dialogue partner of the Association for Southeast Asian Nations, or Asean.
    India stressed ``the strategic importance of Indonesia as a gateway to Asean,'' said an Indian government statement citing Vallabhbhai Kathiria, minister of state for heavy industries and public enterprises.
    India offered to sell machinery, railway locomotives and equipment to Indonesia. It also offered to set up plants in Indonesia to produce industrial machines, fertilizers, tin, palm oil, paper, chemicals, sponge iron, animal feed, synthetic fibers, cotton dyes, automobile parts and power equipment.
    The minister also ``offered Indian expertise in the software sector to Indonesian businessmen.''
    India could use Indonesia as a base to export to other countries in the Asean region, as the Southeast Asian nation emerges out of its worst recession in decades, said President Wahid.
    ``India can assist us in overcoming'' the fallout of the economic slump, the president said at a media conference. His visit could lead to as much as $200 million worth of Indian investments in Indonesia's agriculture and fisheries, he said.
    Indonesia is looking for new business partners after relations were strained with Australia, one of the country's largest business partners, after East Timor voted to break away from the Southeast Asian nation last year.
    India has demand for Indonesia's rich natural resources such as coal, crude petroleum oil, natural gas and other agricultural commodities, said MMTC, a state-controlled company. MMTC controls most of the Indian government's commodities trading.
    Indonesia plans to sell natural gas from its Sabang islands to India, said President Wahid.

    Malaysia also plans to increase economic and business ties with India. It plans to open new refineries in India to maintain market share there in the face of higher import duties, said an industry official.
    Malaysian Primary Industries Minister Lim Keng Yaik on Monday said Malaysian refiners might move to India from China, the Malaysian Business Times reported.
    Malaysian exporters need to set up refineries in India as it's now the largest market for Malaysian palm oil, said Norfadilah Hashim, economic officer at the country's Palm Oil Registration and Licensing Authority, or PORLA.
    "India is now our largest market with 1999 imports of 2.3 million tons, almost double the 1998 level,'' Hashim said.
    Malaysia, the world's biggest palm oil producer, exported 17.8 billion ringgit ($4.7 billion) worth of the edible oil in 1998, its second-largest export after electronics parts. The product is used as a cooking oil, food additive and in cosmetics.


    Comment


      #3
      when your economy has been devestated like Indonesia's and when you are strapped for cash you can't afford the original stuff so you go for the next best thing --- cheap imitations. There is a difference between a genuine Rolex and one made in Hong Kong. The Indian supercomputer is the cheap Rolex made in Hong Kong.

      Comment


        #4
        How about Singapore?

        Comment


          #5
          Ehsan....on what basis are you saying that the Indian supercomputer is a cheap imitation ? Do you have the specs to compare the Indian and the US one. Do you have any reports of customers who have used these machines ? I don't think without that you can make a qualified judgement. There's no point in critisizing it just because it's been made by Indians. The "Param" can match if not exceed any supercomputer in the world !

          Comment


            #6
            Ok.. How many Megabytes? And what about cache? And what about display?

            What Indonesia needs is a super Calculator. I was in Jakarta a few months ago, and Indonesians don’t know their ass from their elbows from when it comes to managing their economy. Their fiscal infrastructure is 100% dependent on foreign markets.

            Indians have made a name for themselves in software development and supercomputer is not about hardware but about software. US supercomputers are only a little superior to Indian ones but cost 20 times more. Indonesia is smart to go Indian.

            Comment


              #7
              Why do u say that the supercomputer is not about hardware but software? It has more to do with hardware than software

              Comment


                #8
                Alright..Alright !! I admit it -- I went a little overboard with the praises
                However, we believe it can match up to US standards in a couple of years. But, you're right as of now, the Americans definitely have an edge over us. In a way it's unfair to even compete with the US given their enormous economic clout. But I feel under the circumstances, we have done pretty well. I have a friend working at "CDAC" (the people who made the "Param" supercomputer) in India and he swears by the "Param", but I guess he can be biased. They have a website -- http://www.cdac.org.in . There's some info in there about their latest offering -- the Param 10000. But I am not sure which one is Indonesia buying !

                Comment


                  #9
                  Dear Mohabbat,

                  Yes you are right. I wasn’t clear. It is as much to do with hardware as it is to with software that designs the hardware. The new IBM, Blue Gene, designed to be 500 times faster than its Deep Blue, posed challenges from software point of view, because Hardware development has its limitations and what you can’t see can be developed beyond one’s imagination. Designs exist to make supercomputer the size of a “tear-drop” but the challenge is to write the software to compute at a speed faster than that of light. I am no engineer, so I only know from reading newspapers and mags, and the little laptop or PC that I have at home is super enough for me to do anything that I want.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Dear Indians


                    Use your brains, which you keep bragging about. USA is a capitalist country. Capitalists don't believe in giving money away for nothing. If USA is courting India you need to ask yourselves why? Maybe they want to give you all their hard earned dollars? They must be dying to make India rich at their own expense

                    [This message has been edited by sabah (edited February 10, 2000).]

                    Comment


                      #11
                      .

                      [This message has been edited by sabah (edited February 10, 2000).]

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Cause they were secular puppets. Is that so hard to understand?

                        Comment


                          #13
                          No one commented on the main issue
                          --
                          Despite whipping India for the past 52 years in every OIC , Commonwealth and UN meeting,
                          by playing the Islamic card on Kashmir issue, Pakistan has failed to isolate the second largest Muslim country India with other OIC members. In the past Pakistan has strongly opposed India's admittance to OIC (Organisation of Islamic countries). Islamic countries like Egypt, Indonesia, Bangladesh,
                          Malaysia and Turkey are keen to improve their ties with India. So has Pakistan failed in it's foreign policy
                          or Economics/Business plays a far more important role than religion. After all India is a much bigger market than Pakistan!

                          Comment


                            #14
                            >>After all India is a much bigger market than Pakistan!<<

                            yes I agree. Enjoy being exploited.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Japan got help (aid, etc) from USA after WWII, and became a trading partner of USA. Japan today has the second largest economy in the world.

                              Pakistan too got help from USA. What did Pakistan do with it ???

                              Comment

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