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    BJP prez Advani resigns for praising Jinnah

    Advani’ double talk days are over. Praising Jinnah as a secular leader is against the RSS guidelines.
    Indians cannot agree that the person who played the communal card for dividing India can be praiseworthy.

    (Web link awaited)

    #2
    Re: BJP prez Advani resigns for praising Jinnah

    Advani said on arrival in Delhi that the trip to Pakistan was historical……He was right.

    http://www.expressindia.com/fullstory.php?newsid=48117

    L.K. Advani quits as BJP chief

    New Delhi, June 7: In a huge fallout following his controversial statements on Pakistan’s founder Mohammad Ali Jinnah, the Partition of India as well as the Babri Masjid demolition has led to BJP president L.K. Advani quitting his post.

    It comes in the backdrop of the RSS virtually ordering him to recant on Monday. Advani had been indicating ever since his arrival from abroad that he would stand by his statements, no matter the consequences.

    The RSS chief KS Sudarshan had also come to Delhi for a crisis meet, and Advani may well have unedrstood what the Sangh was thinking of doing.

    He may have pre-empted the Sangh by taking this huge step, leaving the RSS in a quandarry.

    Comment


      #3
      Re: BJP prez Advani resigns for praising Jinnah

      It is Amazing....

      ADVANI was The Worst of all while its Anti Pak things....

      ANd.. I was Watching his Interview as well on GEO..


      Wondering...... HOW come.... He has Chnaged... 180 Degrees... wat make him take this Turn....

      CURIOUS....


      INVISIBLE HANDS
      FACE OF AN ~.~ANGEL~.~ APPETITE OF A VAMPIRE

      Comment


        #4
        Re: BJP prez Advani resigns for praising Jinnah

        ^agree

        Bechara Adwani

        Article in Urdu:
        http://www.bbc.co.uk/urdu/india/stor...igns_rza.shtml
        Vision comprehends Him not; He comprehends all visions. [Al-Quran]

        Comment


          #5
          Re: BJP prez Advani resigns for praising Jinnah

          even Vajpayee has said that he stands by Advani and agrees with his comments about Jinnah.....so why is there no "Traitor" tag thrown on him?

          Comment


            #6
            Re: BJP prez Advani resigns for praising Jinnah

            Now advani is a secular person ....... just like jinnah
            He was a self made man who owed his lack of success to nobody.
            - Author on Cargill in 'Catch 22'

            Comment


              #7
              Re: BJP prez Advani resigns for praising Jinnah

              advani, the new madhuri dixit. bohut acting maarta hai saala.. wait 2 months and he'll again start his rath yatra crap to inflame people about babri masjid and ram temple.
              Simple ain't easy.

              Comment


                #8
                Re: BJP prez Advani resigns for praising Jinnah

                Its about time Indians started examining the partion more objectively instead of basing it on bias and preconcieved notion. If they could see Jinnah in purely historic terms, minus all the emotionalism, they may see someone who was far more complex then just the bollywood style villain they portray him as.. Its about time they understand the partition from both perspectives...

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: BJP prez Advani resigns for praising Jinnah

                  Poor Indians still have hard time accepting Pakistan and Jinnah as a leader.
                  Pakistan Zindabad

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: BJP prez Advani resigns for praising Jinnah

                    [size=2]To most Indians, Mohammed Ali Jinnah was the architect of the bloody partition of the country on communal lines in 1947. [/size] [size=2] Jinnah - a 'minor conspiratorial figure' to many Indians

                    So when the main opposition Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) leader LK Advani praised the founder of Pakistan as a "secular" leader during his recent trip to the country, it raised the hackles of his fellow Hindu nationalists and the ruling Congress party alike. [/size]

                    [size=2]A hardline Hindu leader even accused Mr Advani of treason for praising Mr Jinnah - "Mr Jinnah was a traitor, is a traitor and will remain a traitor and a person glorifying him is also a traitor," screamed Praveen Togadia of the Vishva Hindu Parishad (VHP). [/size]

                    [size=2]India's grand old party, the Congress, joined issue saying that the secularism of India's freedom movement could not be compared with that of Mr Jinnah's - "It is truly ironic and astounding that Mr Advani considers Mr Jinnah secular," said party spokesman Abhishek Singhvi. [/size]

                    [size=2]Incensed by the row over his encomiums for Mr Jinnah, Mr Advani has now handed in an offer to resign as leader of his party. [/size]

                    [size=2]At the root of the antipathy towards Mr Jinnah, who is fondly called Quaid-e-Azam (Great Leader) in Pakistan, is a general reluctance among many Indians to come to terms with the founder of Pakistan and his country. [/size]

                    [size=2]It has been only a little over a year since the two nuclear-armed neighbours have embarked on a peace process after fighting three wars since Independence. [/size]

                    [size=2]'Minor figure'[/size]

                    [size=2]"The dominant Indian historical narrative is that Mr Jinnah was a minor conspiratorial figure who aligned with the British to bring about partition. We simply do not want to accept him as a significant historical figure," says political philosopher Pratap Bhanu Mehta. [/size]

                    [size=2]In most popular Indian accounts of the freedom struggle, Mr Jinnah's role is overshadowed by Mahatma Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru. [/size]

                    [size=2] Jinnah is considered the architect of the partition of India

                    [/size]

                    [size=2]Mr Jinnah is painted as an obstinate villain of the piece, while Mr Gandhi and Mr Nehru are praised as the true leaders. [/size]

                    [size=2]"Jinnah has either been ignored or, as in the case of the hugely successful film Gandhi, portrayed as a cold megalomaniac, bent on the bloody partition of India," says historian Akbar Ahmed, writing in his book Jinnah, Pakistan and Islamic Identity. [/size]

                    [size=2]The truth is more complex - something many Indians still do not accept. [/size]

                    [size=2]After joining the Muslim League in 1913, Mr Jinnah, a natty westernised Muslim with Victorian manners, showed himself as a true liberal who believed in education, rationality, equality of law and democracy. [/size]

                    [size=2]For the first two decades of his political life, he was seen as a secular politician. [/size]

                    [size=2]From 1925, he moved away from the Congress after differences with Mahatma Gandhi over his strategies to gain freedom. [/size]

                    [size=2]Much later, in 1940, he announced the demand for a separate homeland for Muslims. [/size]

                    [size=2]Secular vision[/size]

                    [size=2]British historian Patrick French believes that Mr Jinnah "remained a secularist of sorts until his death, but also at times he was willing to use communal antagonism in a strategic way". [/size]

                    [size=2]After the partition, Mr Jinnah envisaged a secular, liberal and democratic nation serving the needs of the Muslims, says Mr French. [/size]

                    [size=2] Mr Advani after laying a wreath at Jinnah's mausoleum

                    [/size]

                    [size=2]"His vision of Pakistan was that it would be a homeland from which Muslims could come and go at leisure. He never wanted it to become a theocratic state, and hoped that it would co-exist in harmony with India," Mr French has said. [/size]

                    [size=2]But Mr Jinnah also confounded liberals after taking over as the ruler of newly independent Pakistan. [/size]

                    [size=2]He declared Urdu as the national language of Pakistan riding roughshod over the aspirations of the Bengali speaking people in the populous eastern part of the country (which itself separated in 1971 and became Bangladesh). [/size]

                    [size=2]He also backed the tribal invasion of Kashmir in 1947, which led to the first war over the region. [/size]

                    [size=2]"Jinnah was a liberal of the pre-Gandhian variety. He was a never a very democratic mass politician," says analyst Mahesh Rangarajan. [/size]

                    [size=2] At the root of the popular Indian historical narrative of Mr Jinnah as the villain of partition is also the belief that the man and his party - Muslim League - were solely responsible for the division of the subcontinent. [/size]

                    [size=2]What is conveniently forgotten is the British policy of divide and rule and exploiting communal schisms. In addition, the last viceroy Lord Mountbatten has been accused of speeding up independence at the cost of unity. [/size]

                    [size=2]Many Indians also believe that intransigent Islam alone was responsible for the breaking up of India. [/size]

                    [size=2]What is again forgotten that most Muslim theologians did not support division. [/size]

                    [size=2]Muslim scholar Maulana Azad opposed partition and Maulana Hussain Ahmad Madani did not support Mr Jinnah's 'two-nation' theory along religious lines. [/size]

                    [size=2]"The separatist movement was finally led by a westernised leader like Mr Jinnah. Thus politics, not religion was responsible for partition," says Indian historian Asghar Ali Engineer. [/size]

                    [size=2]"It is true that Mr Jinnah spearheaded the movement and he articulated the aspirations of the Muslim elite, specially of the Muslim minority areas," says Mr Engineer. [/size]



                    [size=2]Legacy [/size]

                    [size=2]Some commentators believe that Mr Advani's endorsement of Mr Jinnah has more to do with his own political ambitions of becoming a truly acceptance pan-Indian leader and an obsession to leave behind a legacy. [/size]

                    [size=2]In a way, the 77-year-old leader was trying to do what former prime minister Atal Behari Vajpayee has done rather successfully in the past - appealing to the non-Hindu nationalist constituency. [/size]

                    [size=2]"But it is going to be more difficult for Mr Advani. He can't simply walk away from his past," says Mahesh Rangarajan. [/size]

                    [size=2]Mr Rangarajan is referring to communal riots in India after Mr Advani's rathyatra (motorised chariot) journey in the early 1990's to whip up support for a temple at Ayodhya that culminated in the destruction of the Babri mosque there. [/size]
                    Pakistan Zindabad

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: BJP prez Advani resigns for praising Jinnah

                      Originally posted by PaKpatriot1
                      Its about time Indians started examining the partion more objectively instead of basing it on bias and preconcieved notion. If they could see Jinnah in purely historic terms, minus all the emotionalism, they may see someone who was far more complex then just the bollywood style villain they portray him as.. Its about time they understand the partition from both perspectives...
                      what perspective do u really want us to have ..... as far as my understanding / knowledge (limited) goes i think partition was a fall out of political rivaraly between nehru and Jinnah and at the same time indecisiveness on the part of gandhi.

                      I dont accept that the reasons for partition were religious.
                      He was a self made man who owed his lack of success to nobody.
                      - Author on Cargill in 'Catch 22'

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: BJP prez Advani resigns for praising Jinnah

                        ^Most Indians have a very negative image of Jinnah, while over looking the faults of Nehru and Gandhi... I respect Gandhi alot, but to single one person out for partition is unfair..
                        Refer to this article in BBC...
                        http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/4617667.stm
                        To most Indians, Mohammed Ali Jinnah was the architect of the bloody partition of the country on communal lines in 1947.

                        Jinnah - a 'minor conspiratorial figure' to many Indians
                        So when the main opposition Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) leader LK Advani praised the founder of Pakistan as a "secular" leader during his recent trip to the country, it raised the hackles of his fellow Hindu nationalists and the ruling Congress party alike.

                        A hardline Hindu leader even accused Mr Advani of treason for praising Mr Jinnah - "Mr Jinnah was a traitor, is a traitor and will remain a traitor and a person glorifying him is also a traitor," screamed Praveen Togadia of the Vishva Hindu Parishad (VHP).

                        India's grand old party, the Congress, joined issue saying that the secularism of India's freedom movement could not be compared with that of Mr Jinnah's - "It is truly ironic and astounding that Mr Advani considers Mr Jinnah secular," said party spokesman Abhishek Singhvi.

                        Incensed by the row over his encomiums for Mr Jinnah, Mr Advani has now handed in an offer to resign as leader of his party.

                        At the root of the antipathy towards Mr Jinnah, who is fondly called Quaid-e-Azam (Great Leader) in Pakistan, is a general reluctance among many Indians to come to terms with the founder of Pakistan and his country.

                        It has been only a little over a year since the two nuclear-armed neighbours have embarked on a peace process after fighting three wars since Independence.

                        'Minor figure'

                        "The dominant Indian historical narrative is that Mr Jinnah was a minor conspiratorial figure who aligned with the British to bring about partition. We simply do not want to accept him as a significant historical figure," says political philosopher Pratap Bhanu Mehta.

                        In most popular Indian accounts of the freedom struggle, Mr Jinnah's role is overshadowed by Mahatma Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru.


                        Jinnah is considered the architect of the partition of India

                        Mr Jinnah is painted as an obstinate villain of the piece, while Mr Gandhi and Mr Nehru are praised as the true leaders.

                        "Jinnah has either been ignored or, as in the case of the hugely successful film Gandhi, portrayed as a cold megalomaniac, bent on the bloody partition of India," says historian Akbar Ahmed, writing in his book Jinnah, Pakistan and Islamic Identity.

                        The truth is more complex - something many Indians still do not accept.

                        After joining the Muslim League in 1913, Mr Jinnah, a natty westernised Muslim with Victorian manners, showed himself as a true liberal who believed in education, rationality, equality of law and democracy.

                        For the first two decades of his political life, he was seen as a secular politician.

                        From 1925, he moved away from the Congress after differences with Mahatma Gandhi over his strategies to gain freedom.

                        Much later, in 1940, he announced the demand for a separate homeland for Muslims.

                        Secular vision

                        British historian Patrick French believes that Mr Jinnah "remained a secularist of sorts until his death, but also at times he was willing to use communal antagonism in a strategic way".

                        After the partition, Mr Jinnah envisaged a secular, liberal and democratic nation serving the needs of the Muslims, says Mr French.


                        Mr Advani after laying a wreath at Jinnah's mausoleum

                        "His vision of Pakistan was that it would be a homeland from which Muslims could come and go at leisure. He never wanted it to become a theocratic state, and hoped that it would co-exist in harmony with India," Mr French has said.

                        But Mr Jinnah also confounded liberals after taking over as the ruler of newly independent Pakistan.

                        He declared Urdu as the national language of Pakistan riding roughshod over the aspirations of the Bengali speaking people in the populous eastern part of the country (which itself separated in 1971 and became Bangladesh).

                        He also backed the tribal invasion of Kashmir in 1947, which led to the first war over the region.

                        "Jinnah was a liberal of the pre-Gandhian variety. He was a never a very democratic mass politician," says analyst Mahesh Rangarajan.

                        At the root of the popular Indian historical narrative of Mr Jinnah as the villain of partition is also the belief that the man and his party - Muslim League - were solely responsible for the division of the subcontinent.

                        What is conveniently forgotten is the British policy of divide and rule and exploiting communal schisms. In addition, the last viceroy Lord Mountbatten has been accused of speeding up independence at the cost of unity.

                        Many Indians also believe that intransigent Islam alone was responsible for the breaking up of India.

                        What is again forgotten that most Muslim theologians did not support division.

                        Muslim scholar Maulana Azad opposed partition and Maulana Hussain Ahmad Madani did not support Mr Jinnah's 'two-nation' theory along religious lines.

                        "The separatist movement was finally led by a westernised leader like Mr Jinnah. Thus politics, not religion was responsible for partition," says Indian historian Asghar Ali Engineer.

                        "It is true that Mr Jinnah spearheaded the movement and he articulated the aspirations of the Muslim elite, specially of the Muslim minority areas," says Mr Engineer.


                        Legacy

                        Some commentators believe that Mr Advani's endorsement of Mr Jinnah has more to do with his own political ambitions of becoming a truly acceptance pan-Indian leader and an obsession to leave behind a legacy.

                        In a way, the 77-year-old leader was trying to do what former prime minister Atal Behari Vajpayee has done rather successfully in the past - appealing to the non-Hindu nationalist constituency.

                        "But it is going to be more difficult for Mr Advani. He can't simply walk away from his past," says Mahesh Rangarajan.

                        Mr Rangarajan is referring to communal riots in India after Mr Advani's rathyatra (motorised chariot) journey in the early 1990's to whip up support for a temple at Ayodhya that culminated in the destruction of the Babri mosque there.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: BJP prez Advani resigns for praising Jinnah

                          Pakistan leadership has turn around 180 from Taliban support and from Kashmir issue, continued kicking the asses of mullahs. What Advani wanted from Pakistani leadership has since been accomplished. Advani was successful in his aim and missission to force Pakistan to bow before India. It does not matter whether he remained in politics or not!

                          FARID

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: BJP prez Advani resigns for praising Jinnah

                            This is all very sad...the trip proved to be very expensive for Advani. He had a nice time and was welcomed with great warmth in all cities he visited in Pak.
                            His changed stance says enough about the chnages on all sides of the border inside all sorts of minds...so those claims of some 'compromises' and 'sell outs' seem more comic. Indeed the current administrations on both sides deserve huge credit for these changes which will prove significant in the long run. The Advani who was the major reason for lack of understanding in Agra now seems to know better when he says "the peace and better ties should be irreversible..."

                            The fuss that's being made by the extremist Hindu faction the RSS over the matter is truly disheartening...Pakistanis consider Gandhi a great leader, he is held in respect, but the kind of hatred Indians have shown for Jinnah is very sad...

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Re: BJP prez Advani resigns for praising Jinnah

                              I think Advani is playing politics.. i can never believe him..He had and his party had promised in parliament that Babri masjid will not be brought down.. but the next day it was down. How can u believe such a guy.

                              Comment

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