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    Indian Brigadier sold secrets in 1965 to Pak

    Ayub’ son has made a sensational news item, can be a marketing trick or …….

    Pak bombshell: Indian brigadier sold us 1965 war plan for Rs 20,000

    PAK He needed money to keep wife happy, rose to top position and is still alive, says Ayub Khan’s son Gohar; ‘You will know his name in my book soon’

    #2
    Re: Indian Brigadier sold secrets in 1965 to Pak

    If it's true..Gohar Ayub would be an idiot to give the mans name..
    How can a man die better than facing fearful odds for the ashes of his fathers and the Temple of his Gods?

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Indian Brigadier sold secrets in 1965 to Pak

      Fantasy from a nobody who wants to sell his book.

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Indian Brigadier sold secrets in 1965 to Pak

        I would say Ayub would have been a bigger idiot if he had told his son about it.
        بِن دانا پانی میں جی لواں
        بِن انَک میں جی نہ سکاں

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Indian Brigadier sold secrets in 1965 to Pak

          I was thinking of posting a thread to discuss this.

          Apparently this is whats been happening;

          http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/may20...main/main4.htm

          Diaries of a field marshal

          Gohar lifts curtain on pages of history

          By Rauf Klasra

          ISLAMABAD: After five decades, dozens of Field Marshal Ayub Khan’s secret personal diaries are being unveiled by his son Gohar Ayub Khan.

          These explosive diaries, which have the potential of stirring heated debates in the military, political and social circles, are written in Ayub’s own hand.

          Ayub imposed the first martial law in Pakistan in 1958 after then-president Sikandar Mirza ordered his arrest along with other generals. Unveiling the secrets of these notes might provide an insight into the most volatile days of the country’s history leading to the dismemberment of its eastern wing in 1971.

          Ayub started recording his daily routine and important events in his personal diaries from August 1966 and this extraordinary exercise continued till November 1972, shortly before his death.

          A young lieutenant, Gohar Ayub Khan, promoted as temporary captain, served as Aide de Camp (ADC) to his father after he assumed power in 1958. Gohar is also witness to many important political events of the country’s history as ADC to his father. The former speaker National Assembly and ex-foreign minister has tirelessly collected dozens of personal diaries of his father lying safely in the cupboards of the family house; read each and every word written by Ayub for at least six years following his death.

          The extraordinary book is expected to hit the market in the near future and might stir new political debates in Pakistan as a lot of new information has been retrieved out of it.

          Ayub took up this Herculean task with a view to enabling the people to have a glimpse into his father’s personal, political and social life when he was calling the shots in Pakistan.

          Talking to The News, Gohar shared many important aspects of his father’s life particularly the days when Ayub started writing his personal notes while lot of changes were taking place around. Gohar said first he sent these diaries to a publisher to retrieve important material from the entire personalised stuff of a former president. But the publisher expressed his inability to read the handwriting of the general. Subsequently, Gohar took the task of reading the entire material from these diaries.

          Gohar also knows the details of many important political events as well as top notch political and military personalities whose very mention is made in the personal notes. The book in its final stages of publication by a prominent publisher has been named as "Diaries of Field Martial" and would have all details of the period from 1966 to 1972.

          The 1966-1972 period was significant in that absolute power was gradually slipping from the hands of the once mighty Ayub. The most trusted minister of his cabinet, Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, whom Ayub was grooming to replace him at one stage, was bent upon rebellion after signing a peace agreement with India in Tashkent. The diaries also include many important international events.

          After talking to Gohar, it transpired that in these crucial years, Ayub made one of the most important appointments in the military by elevating his other trusted soldier General Yahya to replace Gen Musa. But the "trusted soldier" assumed power after forcing Ayub to resign following falling health in the late 1960s.

          The same years saw the decline of Ayub and dramatic rise of Yahya followed by the start of a strong agitation by opposition parties led by the fiery Bhutto, who actually weakened Ayub and strengthened the hands of Yahya to replace Ayub at one stage.

          When Ayub was writing his personal diaries, massive unrest had already started in East Pakistan and Yahya had decided to use military force to subdue the defiant Bengalis.

          To the utter disappointment of Ayub in the last days of his power, a cruel history was repeating itself ... Ayub was being sent messages from the top military brass led by Yahya not only to resign but also leave Pakistan as he (Ayub) did the same with General Sikandar Mirza in 1958.

          Mirza, who was otherwise a personal friend of Ayub, was forced by the military generals of Ayub like Gen Burki, Gen Sheikh and Gen Hameed to resign and settle down in London following the imposition of martial law.

          How Ayub resigned and watched from the sidelines his own hand picked military general (Yahya) and politician (Bhutto) assuming an entirely a different role than what he as president and field martial had envisaged for them in the mid-60s would make for interesting reading.

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Indian Brigadier sold secrets in 1965 to Pak

            and;

            http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/may20...main/main9.htm


            Rs 20,000 changed course of 1965 war: Gohar

            By Rauf Klasra

            ISLAMABAD: Former president Ayub Khan bought an Indian secret plan to attack Pakistan in 1965 from an Indian army brigadier for only Rs 20,000, revealed former president’s son Gohar Ayub Khan in an exclusive interview to The News.

            Indian brigadier, according to Gohar, needed the money for his wife who wanted to buy equipment for fulfilling her hobby of canning fruits and vegetables.

            He said Pakistani agents active in New Delhi exploited this passion of Brigadier’s wife and bought the plan.

            Gohar Ayub is now 68-year old and writing his autobiography that would hit the market in December this year.

            He is an eye-witness to imposition of first martial law by his father General Ayub and has been attending many important meetings during his father’s 10-year rule. He also remained as Speaker of the National Assembly and foreign minister of Pakistan.

            When asked about the name of Indian army brigadier, Gohar said he would give clear indications in his book to expose identity of the Indian military officer, who is still alive.

            This would be a ‘bomb shell’ for the Indian army as the same officer later served at a very top position before retiring ‘honourably’. He said he met the Indian officer in London in 1967.

            Gohar said Ayub Khan was preparing the Pakistan army to fight a war with India to get Kashmir liberated. For this very purpose, he followed a long term policy, he said.

            He said the first thing Ayub did was to join the Baghdad pact as it enabled Pakistan to get American military aid in the shape of ammunition, guns, tanks, submarines, fighter planes, naval ships that otherwise Pakistan could not afford at all.

            The equipment given to Pakistan by the Americans was more advance in technology than that available to the Indian army, he said.

            He claimed that the Pakistani army was secretly saving the ammunition to dodge the Americans who were keeping the record of military equipment being given to Pakistan.

            Secondly, he said, Ayub Khan deputed his intelligent network active in New Delhi to penetrate into Indian Directorate of Military Operations to get their war plan.

            Giving details of the purchase of the war plan, Gohar said a brigadier was traced who agreed to sell the war plan against payment of Rs 20,000. After initial secret negotiations, it was agreed between the Pakistani agents and the Indian army officer that payment would be made in London and he would deliver the war plan in New Delhi after getting confirmation of receipt of the money.

            Gohar claimed that Pakistani military attache in London Brigadier Said Ghaus made the payment. When the GHQ in Pakistan received the secret plan of the Indian army, every body, including Ayub Khan, was surprised to know the comprehensive details mentioned in the plan. Pakistani generals even doubted its credibility by assuming that Indian officer might have planted these secrets with the collaboration of Indian high command. The plan was rechecked from other intelligence sources in New Delhi and it turned out to the actual plan.

            Gohar said Ayub Khan issued instructions to his own military command that in future the Pakistan army should not keep its own plans with so much details as Indians had done so that these plans were not leaked to the enemy. Ayub Khan deployed Pakistani forces on those fronts where Indians planned to attack and also sent some forces to those areas that Indian army did not plan to attack.

            According to Gohar, it was decided that reinforcement would be ensured on those fronts where Indian army was expected to launch attacks. That was why, when Indians launched attacks on Pakistan they found its forces fully prepared. The Lahore military commander, however, failed to implement the plan as he moved his forces late to the much disappointment and annoyance of the top military brass, Gohar said.

            He said initially, the Pakistan army defended its positions when Indians launched attacks. After stabilising those fronts, the Pakistan army launched its attack at Chamb Jorian that was left unguarded by Indians as indicated in their secret war plan. No Indian soldier was found to defend the border and the Pakistan army started its advance secretly.

            Gohar said the Pakistani forces were supposed to cross River Bias bridge to besiege the Indian army in east Punjab and other three division forces that had no idea that the Pakistan army was advancing. When Pakistani forces launched the attack, the Indian fighter jets monitored their movements. Pakistani strike force had been hiding in that area since January 1965, without being noticed by the Indian army.

            A panicked Indian army chief, General Chaudhry, in a meeting told his high command that India should withdraw its forces from Bias as the Pakistan army was advancing from this side and might slaughter his soldiers. However, bad luck struck the Pakistani troops when they were crossing the Bias bridge as one of their tank hit the bank of the bridge that collapsed and blocked the advance into Indian areas.

            According to Gohar, this development put Ayub Khan and other military commanders in a fix as every body was solely depending on this attack but all of a sudden the operation had come to a halt. Major General Sher Bahadur was sent from GHQ, Rawalpindi, by a helicopter to ensure the immediate repair of the bridge. But the bridge could not be repaired even in three days and it enabled Indians to breach their canals to flood the entire area to stop the Pakistan army advance.

            Gohar said Pakistan lost one of the biggest chances of conquering Indian territories because of a small fault of a tank driver and it greatly disappointed Ayub Khan as despite the availability of the secret plan of Indian aggression, Pakistan failed to utilise its advantages in the war. But, he said, payment of Rs 20,000 at least enabled Pakistani forces to defend the massive Indian attack.

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Indian Brigadier sold secrets in 1965 to Pak

              Originally posted by Zakk
              If it's true..Gohar Ayub would be an idiot to give the mans name..
              Exactly! it'd be a shame, even more so since he himself has been a soldier and would know spies are a norm. He'd make a fool out of everyone.

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Indian Brigadier sold secrets in 1965 to Pak

                most stupid thing in his claim is that india wanted to attack pakistan and pakistan defended them self for 20000.

                other thing i felt that at dinner ayub khan used to discuss days happnings with his family.
                He was a self made man who owed his lack of success to nobody.
                - Author on Cargill in 'Catch 22'

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Indian Brigadier sold secrets in 1965 to Pak

                  Originally posted by Haris Zuberi
                  The extraordinary book is expected to hit the market in the near future and might stir new political debates in Pakistan as a lot of new information has been retrieved out of it.
                  I do not make any claim, but I think that nothing will happen and his autobiography book will be a flop.

                  Originally posted by Haris Zuberi
                  He said he met the Indian officer in London in 1967.
                  This one statement is enough to identify the Brigadier........I can say that the Ayub 'son is playing a foolish game in a foolish hope to make money.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Indian Brigadier sold secrets in 1965 to Pak

                    I have one question. Will Gohar Ayub make the original diaries public before publishing the book, so that public can verify the claims he will make in his diaries?
                    I know that you believe that you understood what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
                    - Robert McCloskey

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Indian Brigadier sold secrets in 1965 to Pak

                      I am sure some of Paki generals also sold some secrets as well as their behinds for some ruppess.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: Indian Brigadier sold secrets in 1965 to Pak

                        Its all crystal clear now, makes total sense to me... But if this is what Ayub wrote in his Diary, then shouldnt this give the Indians atleast a reason to be suspicous?

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: Indian Brigadier sold secrets in 1965 to Pak

                          How many Indian officers were in London in 1967 and had a wife who can keen on canning? This guy, if he exists, will be under arrest by now.

                          [QUOTE=Haris Zuberi]. Ayub Khan deployed Pakistani forces on those fronts where Indians planned to attack and also sent some forces to those areas that Indian army did not plan to attack.

                          According to Gohar, it was decided that reinforcement would be ensured on those fronts where Indian army was expected to launch attacks. That was why, when Indians launched attacks on Pakistan they found its forces fully prepared. [QUOTE]

                          Pakistan's forces were unprepared for war all along the front , not just at Lahore. Only in Kashmir was the army on a military footing, due to the heavy skirmishing thre in late summer 1965.
                          Muslims are so good at dividing that they can divide the atom. If you see two Muslims, probably they belong to 3 parties.
                          Al-Ghazali

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: Indian Brigadier sold secrets in 1965 to Pak

                            AJ: I doubt that...Ayub Khans sons were a key factor in his downfall...again as far as the report of Intell bought from an Indian officer ..whether it's true or false is another issue but either way it'll directly effect a whole load of senior officers now as Indian spooks start questioning all sorts of people ...that to be frank is quite a cruel act by Gohar Ayub
                            How can a man die better than facing fearful odds for the ashes of his fathers and the Temple of his Gods?

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Re: Indian Brigadier sold secrets in 1965 to Pak

                              No one Brigadier could have access to "master plans." IA's plans were and still are based at the Corps level and only the COAS, DGMO and GoC of the Corps have access to each Corps role. A Brigadier may have at most known what his component Corps may be doing.

                              There is no evidence that PA knew IA will attack in the Lahore-Sialkot axis.

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