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    Devoted Followers?

    Desecration of any holy book is horrendously disrespectful and just as stupid.

    In reading other posts we are to believe that the Afghan riots were ajustifiable reaction or even the very duty of the offended party.

    We are told, "knowing this is a grave offense to any Muslim, we should expect such a dutiful reaction" to sort of paraphrase.
    It reminds me of the "Don't you ever talk about my mama!" conventional wisdom among some urban groups in the U.S.

    Which brings me to my question. Are the rioters truly aggrieved defenders of the Holy Koran and Islam? So devoted, they are compelled to this violent action? More offended than by the desecration of childrens bodies by Iraqi insurgents who indiscriminately blow them up?

    Or are they simply rioters-caught up in mob mentality? Or more likely something inbetween.

    I guess I'm of the opinion that it's kind of a cop out to simply pass off this riot as the legitimate expression of a truly devout bunch. I'm sorry to single you out Faisal, but it was in one of your posts where I felt you were an unquestioning apologist for this mass reaction. I think there is an undeniably huge socio-political element that spawned the riots-having much to do with an opportunity to express rage at the Americans with the alleged desecration of the book serving as a convenient catalyst.


    That said, this desecration is a serious matter not to be taken lightly, but death and riots?

    #2
    Re: Devoted Followers?

    Death and riots are always a two-way street. Protesters are protesting on the street. Security forces indulge in use of force. People die. Not limited to Afghanistan or Pakistan only. Even highly trained and sophisticated police forces in cities like Seattle and LA got into similar situations not too long ago.

    Point is people have always protested on the streets where they feel they need to make a strong statement. There are invariably leaders amongst them who use mass anger for their own purpose. Additionally, there are many "professional" protesters who will show up in all places, were they to be compensated enough. All these are valid points and are not limited to illiterate nations of Asia.

    However, my point was, and remains that Muslims and non-Muslims should all use common sense and respect for each other's faiths and religious texts (and symbols). These are important for many people. And if allegations surface about desecration, condemn the alleged insult and empathize with those who feel outraged. Not to go around comparing them to two-bit common smugglers, thugs and basically humiliating them even further.

    If the tables were reversed and some moronic mullah burns a cross in Jakarta, and resultant riots in Rio De Janeiro claim lives of 15 Brazilians, you will not see me mocking the "stupid Latin Americans", but you will see us condemn the guys who allegedly burnt the cross, and sympathy for people who lost their lives. Its just common sense and respect for all faiths.
    "Let your friends underestimate your virtues. Let your enemies overestimate your faults." - Godfather.

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      #3
      Re: Devoted Followers?

      Why you say "muslims and non-muslims should all use common sense and respect for each other's faiths and religious texts (and symbols)", it is not so in most Muslims socieites. The Bible has been outlawed in Afghanistan. In some Muslim societies those who convert are put to death. It is against the law to outwardly express your faith in downtown Islam (SA). Non-Muslims aren't even allowed in your Holy Cities. It is commone sense for this respect to not be one-sided.

      Decent Americans do empathize with those who are offended, but not to the extent that it gives them freedom to start riots, kill people and start a Holy War. I empathize with the father whose son got called out on a bad call at home plate, but not to the extent that he is free to strangle the umpire. Perhaps a silly comparison, but an over reaction nonetheless. Who is to judge this man's devotion to t-ball and his son? It could be as protective and emotional as some are with the Quran.

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        #4
        Re: Devoted Followers?

        Yeah but Faisal Bhaijan, if you think that the protesters really give a shyt about Quran, you are na´ve. These a bunch of lowlife idiots who have nothing better to do than to shout crap. Their misery is self inflicted. Poverty combined with illiteracy with a dressing of imported Wahabism, and you have a recipe for disaster.

        They really think that Quran is just a piece of paper, and is only worth what it is written on.




        Faisal Bhaijan, no Molvi will come out to protest if a non-Msulim (or even a Muslim that they dont like, e.g., Shia) is killed. Where have you been living since 1979?

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          #5
          Re: Devoted Followers?

          Originally posted by Faisal
          If the tables were reversed and some moronic mullah burns a cross in Jakarta, and resultant riots in Rio De Janeiro claim lives of 15 Brazilians, you will not see me mocking the "stupid Latin Americans", but you will see us condemn the guys who allegedly burnt the cross, and sympathy for people who lost their lives. Its just common sense and respect for all faiths.

          Perhaps, but I think the Rio crowd might not riot on a story that was part of a small section of a magazine that didn't happen in their midst.

          It seems like we are expected to give a lot of leeway where Muslim religious sensitivities are involved. No doubt all people's personal religious notions deserve respect, and I have no doubt that on the whole Muslims lives are less "secular" than the average Westerner, but I don't totally buy the universality of it-that we are supposed to "understand a little more" the importance of the Holy Koran to a Muslim. I think that what drives the type of mindset that spawns the riots is the perpetuation of the previous statement. And you have exemplified that somewhat,
          as your initial reaction seems to communicate that a Muslim should be outraged and the reaction/riots were somehow expected and understandable.

          I do empathize with the men who rioted-to a point. But I think that they continue to receive a strong message in effect that "enemies of Islam have defiled your religion, and you should act accordingly". This message is rooted far more in political incitement than any true defense of Islam-which after all need not be defended by men in the street burning flags and throwing rocks.

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            #6
            Re: Devoted Followers?

            In the course of history, religious fervor on this scale has always ended badly.

            Always.


            The fervor always spins out of control, and rests on a hair trigger to every perceived slight. This is the equivalent of a doctor tapping a patients knee, and being punted into the next county by a nervous system out of control. The response is disproportionate to the input.
            Boycott Venezuelas State owned Citgo.

            Buy Royal Dutch Shell gasoline!

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