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Stories Of Abuse..........

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  • Bobby1
    replied
    Originally posted by decentGuy View Post

    Don’t underestimate verbal abuse. Sure, the bruises don’t show on the body but those bruises damage humans emotionally. Salary alone is not an indicator of emotional well being. I was the happiest when I was earning near minimum wage. Also the bruises on the body heal way faster. I’ve had some bosses who only hired international students because they knew only international students would put up within their work environment. Later on I realized that employees on work visas are worse off than international students. They have far more de facto restrictions on their ability to change jobs, to travel home and basically on every major life decision. People do not talk about it because of fear of further exploitation. For example, a lady I knew casually told her boss that her husband lost his job and their entire family’s presence in the country was dependent upon her visa. Her boss used that information to exploit her by giving her tighter deadlines from then on and to routinely scold her in front of her coworkers. She started coughing blood due to the stress that built up. Several migrant workers have blogged about their ordeals anonymously but it never gets traction. The ironic thing is that some people who have been through all that and later on no longer need visas turn into the same exploiters themselves rather than showing compassion.
    Looks like you need your boss to give you a hug lol, can you be specific as to what was said to you? That you did not do your job as expected? Does that equate to getting paid 200 dollars a month, laboring 18 hours, getting slapped, kicked, raped, humiliated?
    There are strict laws against verbal abuse, HR departments act very swiftly against any form of abuse.
    I deal with hundreds of people on work visa and they have grins on their faces from ear to ear, both husband wives making 70 k together, also working additional part time jobs making a good life here, most are from India, Nepal, Philippines hardly anyone from Pak, my guess is previous experiences have discouraged employers from immigrating workers from there. Thanks to bad employees who ruined it for the rest, Many employees can be bad employees also, would you agree?

    Leave a comment:


  • decentGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by a7mado View Post

    Dude, no offense but verbal abuse hardly qualifies you to compare yourself to the beaten and the downtrodden, lol. Life is difficult if you're a migrant worker in the middle east. especially if you have no trade skills. Unlike in the west, where people doing "dirty jobs" get remunerated handsomely, a garbage man in Kuwait earns less than $200 a month, has his passport confiscated upon arrival, is forced into a 3 year contract with his employer, is crammed into a roach infested studio apartment with about 19 other people all of whom share the same toilet, has no say in when he gets to go back home, gets routinely mistreated by his superiors, etc... and $200 is not even remotely enough to survive here, let alone be sending money back home to your family.

    Unless you're working upper management or run a successful business, life in this region can be very, VERY difficult.
    Don’t underestimate verbal abuse. Sure, the bruises don’t show on the body but those bruises damage humans emotionally. Salary alone is not an indicator of emotional well being. I was the happiest when I was earning near minimum wage. Also the bruises on the body heal way faster. I’ve had some bosses who only hired international students because they knew only international students would put up within their work environment. Later on I realized that employees on work visas are worse off than international students. They have far more de facto restrictions on their ability to change jobs, to travel home and basically on every major life decision. People do not talk about it because of fear of further exploitation. For example, a lady I knew casually told her boss that her husband lost his job and their entire family’s presence in the country was dependent upon her visa. Her boss used that information to exploit her by giving her tighter deadlines from then on and to routinely scold her in front of her coworkers. She started coughing blood due to the stress that built up. Several migrant workers have blogged about their ordeals anonymously but it never gets traction. The ironic thing is that some people who have been through all that and later on no longer need visas turn into the same exploiters themselves rather than showing compassion.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bobby1
    replied
    Originally posted by navzzz View Post
    Imagine what if a son or daughter of a black/Indian immigrant becomes the president or vice president of the Saudi or UAE or Qatar!!

    oh wait, those places do not have presidents or vice presidents, just hereditary leachers! never mind.....
    Let alone a leadership position just imagine if a Bengali worker fell in love with a Saudi girl? Saudis and Emirates have imprisoned their own princesses and they fear for life from their fathers and brothers. I think they are abusing their own daughters and sisters as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • krash
    replied
    Originally posted by Bobby1 View Post

    It is my understanding that US forced the Europeans out of colonizations, US also played a big role to end apartheid from South America
    Colonization - yes. They opposed it, though not very actively.
    Slavery - no. They were one of the last Western countries to abolish it, after a civil war.
    Apartheid - no. They supported the apartheid regime as an ally in the Cold War. Only after the Cold War ended they let it go.

    Leave a comment:


  • navzzz
    replied
    Imagine what if a son or daughter of a black/Indian immigrant becomes the president or vice president of the Saudi or UAE or Qatar!!

    oh wait, those places do not have presidents or vice presidents, just hereditary leachers! never mind.....

    Leave a comment:


  • Bobby1
    replied
    Originally posted by batameez View Post
    Cant beat Guantanamo Bay

    while middle eastern countries are still somewhat stuck in medievial times

    countries which claim to be all good and poking their nose into others are far worse , especially the dumb ones
    They were enemy combatants who chose war on civilization who believe gang raping little captive girls and selling them is permissible as per their faith. It was a service to humanity to annihilate ISIS, wouldn’t you agree?
    The biggest favour done to the Islamic world was to free them from clutches of barbaric murderous ISIS

    Leave a comment:


  • batameez
    replied
    Cant beat Guantanamo Bay

    while middle eastern countries are still somewhat stuck in medievial times

    countries which claim to be all good and poking their nose into others are far worse , especially the dumb ones

    Leave a comment:


  • Bobby1
    replied
    Originally posted by krash View Post
    US didn't force anyone to abolish slavery. It was the British that played a major role.
    It is my understanding that US forced the Europeans out of colonizations, US also played a big role to end apartheid from South America

    Leave a comment:


  • krash
    replied
    US didn't force anyone to abolish slavery. It was the British that played a major role.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bobby1
    replied
    Originally posted by decentGuy View Post
    The exploitation of migrant workers is not limited to Saudi Arabia, however oftentimes the sympathy is. As a migrant worker myself, I’ve always been told to shut up or go back whenever I complained. So it makes me kind of envy those exploited in Saudi Arabia who at least get a fanfare when they talk of their mistreatment.

    I dislike those who habitually exploit a migrant worker regardless of the country. Let me talk a bit about the plight of migrant workers in the US to add some perspective to this issue. This country had the largest slave-system in history. There are many lessons in the institutional memory of this country. The long term cost of slavery is the main highlight. The huge black population in the US now is what is actually regretted, not the slavery. South America is the South Asia here. So the various migrant worker programs aimed at bringing in workers from South America are designed to keep the ‘good’ parts of slavery without the ‘bad’ parts. Saudi Arabia is 500 years behind in this sophisticated approach so looks worse than it actually is, and the US looks better than it actually is for such workers.
    Sometimes playing victim is easier than taking responsibility of our bad attitude, CEOs of corporations like Google, Microsoft, Master Card are Indians, Obama was son of an African immigrant, Kamala Devi is of Indian decent. The world owes USA the debt of gratitude for forcing the world to abolish slavery. We are not talking about past but present.

    Even in present the Ssudi influenced ISIS and Boko Haram took little girls as slaves and gang raped them.

    There are laws against discrimination and no employer can use those words.

    It really is obvious that you hate this society so why do you find it offensive when people question why you are here? We just had PIA
    disappear here, is it because they hate us?

    Trouble makers of any ethnicity are not appreciated in any organization they like to hire people who cooperate and are not insubordinate and don’t bring the morale of the entire team down.

    Leave a comment:


  • a7mado
    replied
    Originally posted by decentGuy View Post
    The exploitation of migrant workers is not limited to Saudi Arabia, however oftentimes the sympathy is. As a migrant worker myself, I’ve always been told to shut up or go back whenever I complained. So it makes me kind of envy those exploited in Saudi Arabia who at least get a fanfare when they talk of their mistreatment.
    Dude, no offense but verbal abuse hardly qualifies you to compare yourself to the beaten and the downtrodden, lol. Life is difficult if you're a migrant worker in the middle east. especially if you have no trade skills. Unlike in the west, where people doing "dirty jobs" get remunerated handsomely, a garbage man in Kuwait earns less than $200 a month, has his passport confiscated upon arrival, is forced into a 3 year contract with his employer, is crammed into a roach infested studio apartment with about 19 other people all of whom share the same toilet, has no say in when he gets to go back home, gets routinely mistreated by his superiors, etc... and $200 is not even remotely enough to survive here, let alone be sending money back home to your family.

    Unless you're working upper management or run a successful business, life in this region can be very, VERY difficult.

    Leave a comment:


  • SindSagar
    replied
    Yes we can blame most of the Abuse of Domestic Servants and Laborers or for that Matter all foreign Workers on the Iqama system in Saudi Arabia!

    Well now I hear from a friend in Saudi that the Kingdom is doing away with the need for Iqama i.e. or the Sponsor who holds your Iqama....

    so Like MLK said free at last! free at Last! thank God Almighty the Foreign Workers are free at last!...

    So what is the situation on the ground inside Saudi Kingdom I can not say!

    Leave a comment:


  • decentGuy
    replied
    The exploitation of migrant workers is not limited to Saudi Arabia, however oftentimes the sympathy is. As a migrant worker myself, I’ve always been told to shut up or go back whenever I complained. So it makes me kind of envy those exploited in Saudi Arabia who at least get a fanfare when they talk of their mistreatment.

    I dislike those who habitually exploit a migrant worker regardless of the country. Let me talk a bit about the plight of migrant workers in the US to add some perspective to this issue. This country had the largest slave-system in history. There are many lessons in the institutional memory of this country. The long term cost of slavery is the main highlight. The huge black population in the US now is what is actually regretted, not the slavery. South America is the South Asia here. So the various migrant worker programs aimed at bringing in workers from South America are designed to keep the ‘good’ parts of slavery without the ‘bad’ parts. Saudi Arabia is 500 years behind in this sophisticated approach so looks worse than it actually is, and the US looks better than it actually is for such workers.

    Leave a comment:


  • a7mado
    replied
    Originally posted by navzzz View Post

    It does not matter who is calling out who, if in the end the plight of helpless and vulnerable people is highlighted in any way or form.
    It does. This is straight up exploitation.

    Leave a comment:


  • a7mado
    replied
    Originally posted by Bobby1 View Post
    Unjustified arrogance is part of many societies, we find the term menial very offensive, even billionaires here will not use that term to describe anyone’s work.
    I don't find the term 'menial jobs' to be degrading. It literally translate to unskilled jobs.

    You are right about human rights abuses in many ME countries, there are harrowing stories about domestic workers abuse from Pakistan also.

    Societies get punished for collective bad decisions of allowing corruption, rights abuses, not valuing educations, allowing extremists to take control, the ensuing poverty leads to prostitution. Child abuses and all other evils
    I don't know man, people get harassed, assaulted, raped & killed everywhere, be it the slums of Liberia or within the grounds of Harvard.

    Leave a comment:

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