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Starting with a solid base. Part-1

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    Starting with a solid base. Part-1

    No doubt, very intersteing. Will also post part-2 when its online.

    Somewhere on the Yale University campus, Paul Michael Kennedy must be smiling. Remember Paul Kennedy? Back in 1987 the then relatively unknown history professor published the book The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers, and almost instantaneously introduced the expression "imperial overstretch" into popular discourse. Although it did not take long for right-wing commentators to attack him, saying that it was the Soviet, not the US empire that had overstretched, his basic point remains the same. As he wrote 10 years later in Atlantic Magazine: "The United States now runs the risk, so familiar to historians of the rise and fall of Great Powers, of what might be called 'imperial overstretch': that is to say, decision-makers in Washington must face the awkward and enduring fact that the total of the United States's global interests and obligations is nowadays far too large for the country to be able to defend them all simultaneously."
    http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Front_Page/FB13Aa01.html
    Unity, Faith & Discipline....
    --Jinnah

    #2
    "The United States now runs the risk, so familiar to historians of the rise and fall of Great Powers, of what might be called 'imperial overstretch': that is to say, decision-makers in Washington must face the awkward and enduring fact that the total of the United States's global interests and obligations is nowadays far too large for the country to be able to defend them all simultaneously."

    Well the simple fact is that the United States is unable to win a lasting victory in any of the places it is militarily engaged in at present. If anything it is losing the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and that should make them more apprehensive about intervening in other places.

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