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    how can pakistan defend against drone attacks

    The author suggests an interesting defense against these drones in what he calls "predator killer". The question still remains: will our civilian govt. or military take initiative to protect our airspace.

    Just wanted to share this article.

    Predator Killer

    Sat, 2008-11-29 02:14 By Adnan Gill for Asian Tribune

    Obama or no Obama, Predator/UAV/drone attacks on Pakistani interests will remain a common theme for the foreseeable future. Because, itís the Think Tanks that shape the American foreign policy and not the presidents. Presidents merely execute those policies with a tinge of their own flavor.

    We need to come with terms that Americans are not going to vacate from Afghanistan. Obamaís picks for the foreign policy team is a clear indication, it will be business as usual, minus NeoCon rhetoric. Obama is already taking national security advice from the Republican heavyweights, like Brent Scowcroft, who was national security adviser in the Bush seniorís administration. Scowcroft also happens to be close to the current Defense Secretary Robert Gates, who is will be staying in Obamaís Cabinet. Obamaís pick for the Secretary for State, Hillary Clinton is equally hawkish over Afghan and Pakistan policies. All of them want to beef up American presence in the Afghan theater.

    Since all the indicators suggest, Americans will not pull out of Afghanistan anytime soon; therefore, Predator strikes in the future too look quite plausible. Another reality we can bank on is that Pakistani leadership will not develop spine to tell the Americans, in no uncertain terms, to stop the attacks immediately.

    Obviously, Pakistan is politically and technologically too weak to pick a full-fledged fight with the sole superpower. Nobody is fending off the bloody attacks on the Pakistanis, because all the Zardari government does is wink and nod every time a predator attacks.

    However, that does not mean Pakistani military too cannot adopt middle of the road strategy; meaning, neutralize the threat without engaging the Americans or waiting for Zardariís foot-dragging to end. So how do we do that? By beating them at their own game.

    Americans plainly deny and the Pakistani government readily accepts their denials that the UAVs ever violated the Pakistani airspace. In a diplomatic jargon itís called Ďplausible deniabilityí. Therefore, if Pakistani military was to shoot down a UAV, that the Americans refuse to own to begin with, then how the Americans or the Zardari government could react against the action?
    However, contrary to the general perception, shooting down a stealthy Predator, and that too during the pitch dark nights, is not as easy as most people imagine it to be. Considering its aeronautical characteristics and its radar cross-section, currently the PAF has no tool in its shop to consistently shoot them down.

    The problem is: the Predators have a small heat and radar signatures, which makes them hard to detect. They fly above the range of anti-aircraft guns and short range anti-aircraft missiles, and too slow for any of PAF fighters to intercept. For example, the Predatorís typically fly at altitudes between 20,000-24,000 ft, they can loiter over an area of interest for up to 40 hours, cruise at speeds ranging 81-03 mph, and most significantly they can fly as slow as (stall-speed) 62 mph. In contrast, PAFís best fighter, F-16ís stall-speed is approx twice as of Predatorís.

    Fortunately, not all is lost. If Pakistanis can build a nuclear bomb and rewire its aircrafts to deliver the nukes, surely, they could come up with a solution to stop the Predator attacks too. One such solution could be jerry-rigging the domestically produced Mushshak with a gun and/or missiles.

    Mushshakís flying characteristics are compatible with the Predatorís. It can fly close to the altitudes Predators fly at (or even higher if weight is reduced). Its stall-speed is better then Predatorís and maximum speed of 146 mph is also higher than Predatorís; meaning it can successfully catch up and shoot the target without overshooting it. Its low-tech design, superior mission-readiness rate, and ability to use makeshift dirt strips makes it ideally suitable for deployment in the forward areas, without a long and complicated support-chain. Mushshakís range of 500 miles, with two missiles and three drop tanks, enables it to remain on station (in a race track patron) for long periods. Finally, its low cost of maintenance gives the commanders ample flexibility to deploy them in large numbers.

    All the PAF engineers will have to do is slap a gun and/or a wire guided missile on its external pylons. Attach NVDs (Night Vision -- Thermal Imaging -- Devices) to the helmets and shazam: you have a Predator Killer in your arsenal.

    If we keep on waiting for Mr. Zardariís parliamentary committee to come up with some sort of recommendations then we should prepare ourselves for unchecked Predator attacks in the foreseeable future too. Wonder, if one day India is to attack Pakistan, how many days it will take for Zardariís committees to give permission to the Pakistani military to defend the motherland?

    Pakistani military brass should take advantage of Ďplausible deniabilityí to save the Pakistanis from both the Predators and Mr. Zardariís committees. Because life of each and every Pakistani is as precious and worth defending, as of any of Americanís or as of any Pakistani ministerís.
    I am only responsible for what I say, not for what you understand.

    #2
    Re: how can pakistan defend against drone attacks

    And what does Adnan Gill recommend for defence after the USAF bombs the Mushshak bases in retaliation?

    Also, Mushshak has no radar. Good luck flying it at night and trying to shoot down a drone.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by 5Abi View Post
      The author suggests an interesting defense against these drones in what he calls "predator killer". The question still remains: will our civilian govt. or military take initiative to protect our airspace.
      Dreaming with our eyes open is not going to get us anywhere. We need to stop all help to US until all the attacks stop. No need to float fancy technical ideas which work only on internet. We just need to discover a simple thing which we lost: SPINE

      Comment


        #4
        Re: how can pakistan defend against drone attacks

        lol at using Mushak for predator killing... this so called media freedom put jokers in front of us..
        I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.

        Comment


          #5
          Re: how can pakistan defend against drone attacks

          Well i think john mccan's meeting with pakistani officials todays was very diplomatic and hopeful, Allah karey iss sab ki zaroorat hi na parey
          KON DETA HAI OMAR BHAR KA SAHARA FARAZ
          LOG TU JANAZAY MAIN BHI KAANDHAY BADAL'TE REHTE HAIN

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by 5Abi View Post
            The author suggests an interesting defense against these drones in what he calls "predator killer". The question still remains: will our civilian govt. or military take initiative to protect our airspace.
            Do you seriously think Pakistan dont have ability to take down these drones . Its in Pakistan best interest to pin point and kill the wild animals for the sake of humanity not just Pakistani's.
            I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by 5Abi View Post
              The author suggests an interesting defense against these drones in what he calls "predator killer". The question still remains: will our civilian govt. or military take initiative to protect our airspace.

              Just wanted to share this article.
              ....
              Calm down guys. USA knows it and so do Pakistanis that the use of drones is like "Chutki katna" even for a small airforce.

              Using drones to kill terrorists (or suspected terrorists) is like using bow and arrow to hunt dear. Sure you can use nukes to kill whole lot more dear but that won't be nice. The streams would get bad, and the land won't be good to grow food.

              Using nuclear strike to kill dear was just to show two extreme ways to kill your objective. It really depends how nice you want to be with your target (or things around your target). That's all.

              USAF can easily use bombs from F-15s, daisy cutters, Apaches, stealth bombers, cruise missiles etc. But they don't! Because deep down they still have hope and they do want Pakistan to survive and take care of its people.

              I mean President Clinton used the same weapons to defeat Serbian terrorist aka Melosovich. President Reagon used these against Libyan terrorist Qaddafi, President Bush-I and II used the same weapons against Saddam. They never wanted to use lesser force or "chutkis". Sure the drones were not advance back then, but that's not the point. The point is that if you have a "big Mukkah" and you still use chutki, there is some mutual respect or at least feeling of such care.

              There are many many reasons that keep USA from using the "big Mukkah" in FATA instead of using pin-pricks or chutkies? think about it brothers!

              It is time to use some aqal, and to civilize FATA if we really think they belong to Pakistan, and FATA arispace is ours. Remember though, to claim a space to be yours you must be able to protect it agasinst the outlaws, smuglers, gun runners, kidnappers, and killers of your law enforcement agents.

              If you have gun slingers "dirty harrys" aka Masoods challenging the very concept of Pak borders, then who are you to claim that Pakistan must defend the airspace using "Mushtaqs" and "Khans".

              Comment

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