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    US Resumes Massive Re-arming Of Pakistan

    One can clearly see US double standards sanctions and no sanctions only on Pakistan for developing nuclear weapons but US is the main poliferator to countries of its choice.

    First sanctions were imposed in 65 for going to war with India, in 71 they send their aircraft carrier loaded with weapons it still has not arrived yet.

    We have come a long way with these sanctions thanks to China and France we have our own state of the art tank (AL-Khalid) and sub (Agosta 90B). For fighter jets we should explore other posibilities eg.. French Mirage or Rafael or Chinese J10/J11/J12. I think US should shove those F16s coz the sanctions will return when it serves them better.

    The Finanical Express of India

    New Delhi, Aug 6: Recent reports from Washington suggest that the US administration has initiated the process of re-arming Pakistan once again, reminiscent of the mid-80s when the US supplied it billions of dollars worth of arms. After a long gap of more than four years during which no proposals for transfer of defence items to Pakistan was made ¡ª from early 1998 to mid 2002 ¡ª the US State Department has of late been approving licences for transfer of such items to Pakistan in unprecedented numbers.

    In the week of July 15, 2002, the last week for which data is available, 23 license approvals were forwarded to the US Congress, many of them for items relating to F-16, transfers of which had been prohibited by various acts of the Congress from early 90s onwards. In the subsequent weeks, for which public data has not yet been released, indications are that additional approvals for such transfers have been continuing at a similar rate. The F-16s in the Pakistan Air Force (PAF) inventory, for example, are the frontline aircraft of the PAF modified for delivery of nuclear weapons.


    In addition there are a number of other factors that are likely to intensify the US supply of military hardware to Pakistan. The US-Pakistan Defence Consultative Group (DCG) suspended in 1998 has been revived and significantly the US administration has made the first-ever budgetary request for FMF (Foreign Military Financing) assistance to Pakistan, the first-ever such request since 1990.


    The situation will become even more critical in the coming months when the current restrictions on military transfers to Pakistan will all be lifted, after which there will be no bar on any type of military transfers or assistance to Pakistan. The security implications of such unbridled military transfers for Indian security need hardly be emphasised. That being the case it is not difficult to envisage the serious effects of such transfers on the ongoing efforts at improving the bilateral Indo-US relations.


    This evolution of US-Pakistan Military relations ¡ª from one where any type of assistance under any scheme was barred to Pakistan in 1990 to one where all types of military assistance are allowed ¡ª evolved in two stages, both of which were unfortunately not fully appreciated by Indian security analysts. The US sanctions on military supplies to Pakistan was first invoked in April 1979 by President Carter as a result of Pakistan¡¯s violation of Sec 669 of the Foreign Assistance Act (FAA), the so-called Symington amendment. It was followed by sanctions under Glenn amendment as well. As a result, all military supplies to Pakistan had come to a halt in 1979. However, the developments in Afghanistan in 1981 forced the US administration to review its military relations with Pakistan and as a result a new legislation ¡ª Sec 620E of FAA ¡ª was passed in December 1981 to resume such supplies, giving the President authority to waive the existing sanctions. An assistance program worth $4 billion followed it.


    By 1985 it became apparent that Pakistan was embarking on a major clandestine nuclear weapon program, involving among other things, illegal exports from the US of items meant to support its nuclear weapon program. Accordingly in order to discourage Pakistan¡¯s nuclear weapon program, the US Congress enacted far stricter restrictions on the conditions under which the President could offer assistance, including military, to Pakistan. This amendment to FAA, popularly known as the Pressler amendment, required the President to certify that ¡°during the fiscal year in which the US aid was to be furnished or military equipment or technology is to be sold or transferred, that Pakistan does not possess a nuclear explosive device and that proposed the United States assistance program will reduce significantly the risk that Pakistan will posses a nuclear explosive device.¡±


    During the following years the US presidents issued five such certificates covering the fiscal years 1986-90. Thereafter, the US presidents felt unable to issue such certificates and as a result all aid to Pakistan ceased in 1990.


    By mid-1990s, the US administration was feeling the far-reaching effects of the Pressler amendment. Because the Amendment banned aid and arms transfers to Pakistan under FAA or any other Act, it had effectively brought to a stop all official bilateral aid or assistance from the US to Pakistan in all spheres of activities.


    Efforts were made, therefore, by the US Congress and the US administration to find a way out. Accordingly amendments were made to Sec 670E of FAA in 1996. Known as Brownback Amendment it restricted prohibitions on the US assistance to Pakistan to only military assistance (Brown Amendment); and allowed for transfer to Pakistan of military equipment, technology or other services other than F-16 aircraft, pursuant to contracts or cases entered into before October 1990. Subsequent to this, transfers of military supplies to Pakistan resumed in 1996. Such transfers were once again stopped as a result of the sanction that was imposed on Pakistan in May 1998 as a result of its nuclear test.


    The US Congress gave the President the authority to waive the sanctions on India and Pakistan in October 1999. However, while the only India-related sanctions were in respect of the May 1998 nuclear tests, the then existing sanction on Pakistan were not only in respect of the May 1998 tests but many which were in force because of the pre-May 1998 violations of the US laws by Pakistan. The Congressional waiver authority did not differentiate between India and Pakistan and as a result gave the President authority to waive all sanctions on Pakistan i.e., the Symington, Glenn and Pressler sanctions.


    While President Clinton exercised partially his waiver authority on October 27, 1999, allowing for civil bilateral and multilateral aid, he did not waive the sanctions relating to military transfers. Meanwhile, Pakistan came under additional sanctions, first for democracy-related sanctions in 1999 as a result of the military coup and then again in November 2000 for MTCR (Missile Technology Control Regime) violations. Thus in early pre-Sept 11, 2001, the following military supply related sanctions were in place against Pakistan: i) The Symington sanctions of April 1979; ii) the Pressler sanctions, as amended in 1996; iii) the Glenn sanctions of May 1998 and iv) the MTCR-related sanctions of November 2000.


    Once again as a result of events in Afghanistan, the US President waived all these sanctions operating on Pakistan based on the waiver authority of October 1999 and the Brownback Bill of October 2001 (P.L. 107-57). As a result, limited one-time supplies of military items were allowed till November 2002 and thereafter, the complete range of military supplies and assistance, unencumbered by any legislative restriction. In short after November 21, 2002 there will be no restriction whatsoever on any type of military assistance or supply from the US to Pakistan.



    [This message has been edited by Abdali (edited August 08, 2002).]

    #2
    Abdali, our F16s make our PAF invincible, and we thats an American creation. I just wish the yanks would give us the F16s that were rightfully ours, and we could really use those to make our PAF alot stronger, even though considering our neighbours impressive crash rate, we might not need them. Like it or not, American weapons are state of the art, and I wouldnt mind our country employing them to keep a balance of power with India.

    [This message has been edited by Spock (edited August 08, 2002).]

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Spock:
      Abdali, our F16s make our PAF invincible, and we thats an American creation. I just wish the yanks would give us the F16s that were rightfully ours, and we could really use those to make our PAF alot stronger, even though considering our neighbours impressive crash rate, we might not need them. Like it or not, American weapons are state of the art, and I wouldnt mind our country employing them to keep a balance of power with India.

      [This message has been edited by Spock (edited August 08, 2002).]
      American weapons are useless without spares think long term not short term. Beside the best bet would be to develop our own or ask for transfer of technology like Agosta which is very unlikely US will do.

      One bird in hand is better than two in the bush.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Abdali:
        American weapons are useless without spares think long term not short term. Beside the best bet would be to develop our own or ask for transfer of technology like Agosta which is very unlikely US will do.

        One bird in hand is better than two in the bush.
        I saw we get weapons from where we can... I mean look at those F16s, what a beautiful piece of machinery. Have you had the chance to see one closely? No other fighter plane comes close to it!!! (except the B2s etc, but they are out of the question).

        I saw you declare me the ameer of controlling the F16s, then we are in business.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Spock:
          I saw we get weapons from where we can... I mean look at those F16s, what a beautiful piece of machinery. Have you had the chance to see one closely? No other fighter plane comes close to it!!! (except the B2s etc, but they are out of the question).

          I saw you declare me the ameer of controlling the F16s, then we are in business.

          Spock you are living in the past F16 is an old plane. And you cannot compare F16 with B2s they have different roles. French Mirage 2000-5, rafael, Russian SU35, Chinese J10 etc..are far more capable than F16s.

          Instead of falling in the same trap again it will be wise for us to go to Ukraine and get SU27s instead they are on offer and SU27 is far more capable than F16 if armed with western avionics.

          In the past we had to get spares from the black market at marked up prices and we had to canablise few F16s to keep others flying..
          I am sure no militay planner would want to repeat that.

          Fool me once shame on you fool me twice shame on me.

          Comment


            #6
            Yar, F16s are the best!!! Just have a look at one fly!!! It rox!!! Its the only one that can deep thrust. Does India have F16s?

            Btw, what about my promotion to the ameer of F16s?

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Spock:
              Yar, F16s are the best!!! Just have a look at one fly!!! It rox!!! Its the only one that can deep thrust. Does India have F16s?

              Btw, what about my promotion to the ameer of F16s?
              I would like you to search the web for the specifications of:-

              F16 (the latest block)
              SU35
              Mirage 2000-5
              Rafael
              J10

              And draw your own conclusions.... BTW you already have a position in my khalifat you cannot have two. http://www3.pak.org/gupshup/smilies/smile.gif

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Abdali:
                I would like you to search the web for the specifications of:-

                F16 (the latest block)
                SU35
                Mirage 2000-5
                Rafael
                J10


                yara can yo do that for me, Im no good at finding military stuff on the net, and you can pm me. I talked to my cousin in PAF, he tells me the F16s are the sweetest, and since Ive not flown one of those http://www3.pak.org/gupshup/smilies/frown.gif I wouldnt no how good they are. But when it comes to design, specs etc, they are sweeet!! Nothing can beat Americans at making fighter jets. look at the B series.

                And draw your own conclusions.... BTW you already have a position in my khalifat you cannot have two. http://www3.pak.org/gupshup/smilies/smile.gif
                I thought I already had two positions!!! RD's position of clubs was handed to me!!!!

                Comment


                  #9
                  No it was not beside RD will never relinquish such an honorable position.

                  P.S: There was a long discussion on PakDef a while back with all the links I will have to dig em out.


                  [This message has been edited by Abdali (edited August 08, 2002).]

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Abdali:
                    No it was not beside RD will never relinquish such an honorable position.

                    Good to see my ministerial portfolio is still safe! http://www3.pak.org/gupshup/smilies/wink.gif ..I won't make a dash for Dubai,London, or SA just yet! http://www3.pak.org/gupshup/smilies/wink.gif

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Stick to the topic.

                      [This message has been edited by outlaw (edited August 08, 2002).]

                      Comment


                        #12
                        The final nail has been put on the coffin. No more of those F-16s for us.

                        Pakistani F-16 Jets Going to U.S. Navy, USAF

                        Charles R. Smith
                        Thursday, June 13, 2002
                        Fighters Find New Top Gun Home After 10 Years

                        The U.S. Navy "Top Gun" school, long neglected and nearly disbanded during the Clinton years, is finally getting some new life. The Naval Air Station at Fallon, Nev., is slated to obtain 14 of 28 F-16 Lockheed-Martin Fighting Falcons originally sold to Pakistan.

                        The 1992 sale of the 28 Falcons to Pakistan was canceled during the last days of the Bush Sr. administration because Islamabad had openly purchased nuclear weapons technology from China. The sudden appearance of Chinese nuclear-tipped M-11 ballistic missiles brought a swift embargo of U.S. arms sales on Pakistan, including the previously ordered F-16 Falcons.

                        The 28 Falcons were mothballed, sitting for nearly a decade in the U.S. Air Force Aerospace Maintenance Regeneration Center at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. The Block 15 A and B models are upgraded with advanced Head's Up Displays (HUDs) avionics and improved engines intended for foreign military sales.

                        In June 2002, the Bush administration determined that 14 of the 28 Falcon jet fighters should be turned over to the Navy's Top Gun school and serve as part of the adversary squadron. The F-16s are slated to replace aging F-18 and F-5 jets at the Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center.

                        All 28 of the F-16 jets have had their Pakistani star and crescent moon insignia painted out and engines reconditioned. The remaining 14 F-16 Falcons are slated to be transferred to Edwards Air Force Base to serve with the 412th Test Wing as chase planes. The planned transfer of the ex-Pakistani F-16s to the U.S.A.F. has run into opposition from a variety of sources.

                        Marine Corps Left Out

                        One suggestion that has topped the list for the ex-Pakistani F-16s is to send the Falcons to the U.S. Marine Corps aggressor squadron VMFT-401 in Yuma. VMFT-401 is currently equipped with Vietnam-era vintage F-5 fighter jets. The aging U.S.M.C. aircraft are described as "about to become pumpkins."

                        The Pakistani F-16 jets have had a checkered past and have frequently been used as a political softball. New Zealand was the last country to make a bid for the mothballed Falcons but changes in its government canceled the deal. Prior to the possible New Zealand sale, the Clinton administration offered the mothballed Falcons to Indonesian dictator Suharto. In April 1994, Indonesia replied to Clinton's offer and agreed to pay cash to buy 11 of the original order of 28 Pakistani F-16s, with delivery by the end of 1994.

                        Indonesian F-16 Deal

                        At the November 1994 APEC conference, Commerce Secretary Ron Brown convinced Indonesia that it could get a great deal on the remaining 17 F-16 jet fighters. Thus, Indonesia committed itself to purchase the entire lot of 28 jets, with delivery scheduled for 1997.

                        Indonesia was then tightly controlled by the brutal dictatorship of President Suharto and his family. Because of the documented human rights abuses of the Suharto regime, the Clinton administration had openly declared a policy barring small arms and crowd control equipment.

                        Yet, according to the same Clinton administration, there was no law banning the sale of the jet fighters to Indonesia.

                        "The sale to Indonesia would not conflict with U.S. policies on human rights because it is unlikely that Indonesia would be able to use the aircraft to suppress legitimate dissent, as it might with small arms," noted the official Clinton State Department policy on Indonesia.

                        Human rights abuses were not the only problem inside Indonesia. In August 1996, riots erupted in Jakarta when police raided the headquarters of the Indonesian Democratic Party, the main pro-democracy opposition. At least five people died and scores of buildings and vehicles were set on fire.

                        As a result of the unrest, the Clinton administration decided to put the F-16 sale on hold until later in the year, but then reversed itself, giving the green light for Suharto to acquire the F-16s.

                        "A regionally respected [Indonesian] armed forces with credible defense capabilities that trains and operates in a non-threatening manner is an important contributor to the regional stability," noted the official Clinton State Department announcement on the renewed sale.

                        F-16 Sale Linked to Illegal Clinton Donations

                        By late 1996, the F-16 sale seemed relatively certain. However, this all changed after the 1996 U.S. elections when allegations arose concerning illegal campaign contributions by Indonesian nationals to the Democratic Party.

                        Congress began looking at the relationship between the sale of these planes and the campaign contributions. Both Democrat and Republican Senate leaders called upon the Clinton administration to delay the sale until after such an investigation could be completed.

                        Yet President Clinton continued to support the sale, which was to be completed in the latter part of 1997. Congressional criticism strengthened as the brutal Suharto regime continued to crack down on all opposition.

                        Finally, the F-16 sale was canceled by Indonesia after political questions were raised in the U.S. Senate on Suharto's close financial relationship with Clinton, John Huang and Webster Hubbell. In a letter sent to President Clinton, Indonesian officials cited the "wholly unjustified criticisms in the United States Congress against Indonesia."

                        In apparent retaliation to the congressional inquiries, Indonesian dictator Suharto renewed contacts with Moscow and cut a low-cost deal with Russia for 30 Sukhoi SU-27 jet fighters. The Russian fighter deal eventually failed due to Suharto's overthrow and final Indonesian economic collapse.

                        Pakistan Still Wants Jets

                        In November 2001, the Pakistani F-16 deal came back to haunt the new Bush administration. The president of Pakistan, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, made the F-16 transfer a major political issue with Washington as part of the new war against terrorism.

                        Musharraf said transferring the fighters would be an important symbolic gesture of American gratitude for his nation's strong support in the war in Afghanistan.

                        "I did take up this case, frankly, not because that much of it was significant from a defense point of view. It has its significance, certainly, but not as much as I should have highlighted it. It's more for public perceptions in Pakistan," stated Gen. Musharraf.

                        In November 2001, President Bush and Secretary of State Colin Powell discussed the matter with Gen. Musharraf in meetings in New York, and then decided against making the fighters a part of renewed ties with Pakistan.

                        "They would like to have the planes, but at the moment we are restarting our military-to-military relationship in a more serious way, and the planes are not an issue that we expect to be discussing in the very near future," stated Secretary Powell.

                        Despite the rejection, Gen. Musharraf said Pakistan still wants the planes as a visible sign that the United States is restoring Pakistan to the status of a genuine ally. Having his public request turned down flat was an embarrassing setback that Musharraf said would be "received negatively" in Pakistan.

                        The Bush administration, however, denied the transfer because of the tense situation between Pakistan and India. According to Bush officials, transferring the F-16s could upset that delicate balance, especially because the Falcons are capable of dropping nuclear weapons.

                        "Any transfer of advanced weapons would get everyone all riled up," a State Department official said.

                        ------------------
                        But now I have learned to listen to silence. To hear its choirs singing the song of ages, chanting the hymns of space and disclosing the secrets of eternity..
                        Khalil Gibran


                        [This message has been edited by 5Abi (edited August 09, 2002).]
                        I am only responsible for what I say, not for what you understand.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by 5Abi:
                          The final nail has been put on the coffin. No more of those F-16s for us.

                          Pakistani F-16 Jets Going to U.S. Navy, USAF

                          5Abi,
                          The original F16 are not in question the money for those was refunded along with one time waiver for spares etc.....I remember US refuned $380M + Harpoon missiles and spares for F16s and Orion PC3s and yes don't forget the soya bean oil. Since the sanctions will be removed after 1st Nov 2002 should we fall in the same trap again and pay for F16s and get Soya bean instead.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Abdali, thanks for clarification. I am not sure how much of tactical weaponry US would be willing to give Pakistan w/o much resistance in Congress. Congressmen here, supporintg much influential Indians, will certainly lobby against it. They certainly dont wanna upset the delicate military balance in the region.
                            Pakistan should certainly look for other options as well as u mentioned above.

                            ------------------
                            But now I have learned to listen to silence. To hear its choirs singing the song of ages, chanting the hymns of space and disclosing the secrets of eternity..
                            Khalil Gibran
                            I am only responsible for what I say, not for what you understand.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              My bet is that Pakistan will get the F-16 (Block 15) from the US soon.

                              Recently US offered India the same F-16s that it denied to Pakistan - Source (Orbat.com)

                              This reuslted in India getting pi$$ed off because Block 15s are old stuff. India would only even look at Block 50s, nothing older. B

                              My sources (from Indian MoD - My Dad is a senior MoD official) tell me that this was a deliberate move on the Pentagon side to clear the decks for the transfer of these old F-16s to Pakistan. US knows India will raise a big hue and cry, so they can say - "We offered to you, you did not take it because they are old. So if it is old tech, then why are you worried that Pakistan is having it"

                              India knows that Pakistan will easily re-fit these to carry nukes.

                              Unkle is playing the same double game...

                              Comment

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