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    Chinese warships for Pakistan Navy

    In a major revamp of the Navy costing some $630 million, Pakistan is to acquire Chinese warships to replace its old British stock.

    Good news for the Navy and godd news for PAK-China relations!


    http://www.timesofindia.com/today/12worl2.htm

    Chinese warships for Pakistan Navy


    ISLAMABAD: Pakistan Navy in a US$ 630 million modernisation plan is to acquire a frontline Chinese warship and build three others indigenously under technology transfer, according to Chief of Naval Staff Admiral Abdul Aziz Mirza. Declaring that the process of acquisition of the four warships would be completed by the next decade, Admiral Aziz said that procurement of warships from China would be cost-effective in comparison with the purchase of ships from other western countries.

    The Pakistan naval chief was quoted by The News as saying that induction of Chinese warships was part of moves by the Navy to phase out British built destroyers in a phased manner in the next ten years. Aziz, the paper said also hinted at moves to develop Gawadar Port on the Makran coast in Baluchistan as an alternatiive to country's main seaport Karachi, which he said was vulnerable to Indian warships.

    The naval chief said that building of an alternative seaport was also a must keeping in view plans to lay gas pipelines from Central Asian states via Afghanistan. He also said that Malaysia, Saudi Arabia and Qatar had shown interest in acquisition of French built Agosta submarines from Pakistan.

    Aziz also said that Pakistan would soon acquire a survey ship at a cost of $70 to 75 million



    #2
    Malik Bhai that is a very good news, but I think the 10 year time should be cut down to 6 years.

    [This message has been edited by Musalman (edited January 11, 2001).]

    Comment


      #3
      Excellent news.
      Post something more after namaz.

      ------------------
      CROIRE A L'INCROYABLE
      You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

      Comment


        #4
        Its another massive step in the increasing economic and military cooperation between the next leading power of the world, and Pakistan.

        And unlike the sad state of the Indian Navy it should make our Navy one of the strongest in Asia.

        Comment


          #5
          More news from Malik about China. Poor ZZ will be choking on his egg noodles.

          Comment


            #6
            More news from Malik about China. Poor ZZ will be choking on his egg noodles.

            http://www3.pak.org/gupshup/smilies/dixsi.gif

            Man you are the best! A true leader!

            [This message has been edited by Malik73 (edited January 12, 2001).]

            Comment


              #7
              I was just checking out BK and i really think we need a forum for Military info board.
              Here is something cool and bad.
              More help from the chinese and not the west.

              =============================================

              G-7 sanctions retard Super-7 project

              ISLAMABAD - The Pakistan Air Force (PAF) is on the verge of downgrading the specifications
              for its next-generation multi-role combat aircraft, the Super-7, because of the Group of
              Seven's enforcement of an informal ban on weapons sales since last year's military take-over,
              a ranking PAF source said Thursday. "We will soon reach the point where we may be forced to
              take a decision to adopt a Chinese avionics suite, instead of the more advanced technology
              we had hoped to procure from the West," he told The Nation.

              "Air Command has already been instructed to draw up alternate plans," he said. The political
              fall-out of the G-7 sanctions is also expected to upset the development schedule of the
              Super-7, delaying delivery of the first prototype beyond its 2003 deadline, the PAF source
              said. The revelation comes a week after India sealed a contract with Russia for the supply of
              140 Sukhoi Su-30 Mk1 fighters, along with a complete transfer of technology and production
              licence. The combination of India's latest acquisitions and the downgrading of the Super-7's
              technology are a major blow to the PAF, which has been seeking to re-establish a qualitative
              edge over its Indian counterpart and expected the new combat plane to fulfil about 70 per
              cent of its future operational requirements.

              The hi-tech version of the Super-7 was viewed as the ideal replacement for the PAF's ageing
              medium-tech fleet of F-6s, F-7s, A-5s and Mirages, which are to be retired over the next
              decade. It is now obvious that its Air Staff Requirement of 150 Super-7s will have to be
              revised to take into account its inability, in the short-to-medium term, to procure advanced
              Western avionics, including a multi-mode Pulse Doppler Radar, a mission computer, INS and
              multi-function displays. The Western arms embargo also means that the PAF will have to
              revise the Super-7's weapons package, which was to have included a variety of conventional
              and guided weapons, a potent SRAAM and an active MRAAM.

              The PAF will have little choice but to press the government for a much larger number of the
              Chinese version of the combat plane, known as the FC-1, which is to have basically the same
              airframe as the Super-7, but would have to be equipped with Chinese-manufactured avionics
              and weapons systems. There are also small differences in aircraft systems and equipment.
              Pakistan has had to struggle to find an overseas partner for the Super-7 venture. Its earlier
              overtures to Turkey and the United Arab Emirates were rebuffed. Ankara remains committed to
              the production under licence of the F-16, while the UAE has preferred off-the-shelf purchases.
              Beijing, too, had hesitated to form a joint venture, because of its belief in more affordable
              options and weaponry, and had sought to place the responsibility for the procurement of
              avionics with the PAF.

              They were finally convinced by former chief of the air staff, Air Marshal Abbas Khattak, to
              collaborate in the avionics venture on strategic grounds. It took three years of negotiations
              between 1995 and 1998 to finalise the two sides' selection of equipment, statement of work
              and cost evaluation. A memorandum of understanding was signed by the governments of
              Pakistan and China during the visit of the then prime minister, Nawaz Sharif, to Beijing in
              February 1998. This was followed by the inking of a formal contract during his next visit to
              China in June last year. Appropriately, Thursday's revelations about the Super-7's development
              came on the sidelines of a ceremony at Air Headquarters to launch The Story of the PAF
              (1988-98) - A battle against the odds, a book that details the retarding effect of international
              sanctions on Pakistan's air defence capability over the last decade.

              The book, drafted by a team led by retired Air Marshal Rasheed Sheikh, candidly relates the
              difficulties encountered by the PAF since October 1990, when the Bush administration
              adjudged Pakistan to have crossed the nuclear threshold. This resulted in the cancellation of
              the Peace Gate-IV programme, under which Pakistan was to have spent US$1.4 billion on the
              induction of 60 new F-16s between March 1993 and February 1997. The enforcement of the
              Pressler Amendment was reflected within a year, when the PAF's fleet of F-16s was hit by
              engine-related problems and all aircraft had to be grounded. The PAF's Project Falcon initiated
              engine inspections and depot level work at the Sargodha Air Base, but it took two years to
              recover the 32 aircraft.

              Washington also resisted the implementation of the Falcon-Up F-16 upgrade programme,
              saying it was prohibited under the Pressler Amendment, but were eventually convinced to
              relent on the grounds that programme was a safety-related one, and did not enhance the
              aircraft's operational capability. The earlier enforcement of the Pressler Amendment also
              prompted the PAF to launch efforts to procure a non-American hi-tech aircraft.

              Between late 1990 and 1993, it evaluated and rejected the British Tornado, took a close look
              at the Mirage 2000E, and received a misleading offer from Poland for the supply of MiG-29s
              and Su-27s. In 1992, the PAF revived an 11-year-old proposal to acquire 20-40 Mirage 2000s,
              but Paris was reluctant to sell a fully capable version for political reasons. A possible
              alternative appeared in August 1994, when Sweden's SAAB conglomerate offered to supply its
              JAS-39 Grippen aircraft, but the deal was killed because of its 20 per cent American
              component content.

              Meanwhile, France had offered the Mirage 2000-V and upon re-evaluation, the PAF concluded
              that model incorporated the technological jump that it had been looking for. The French offer
              was not based upon the PAF's the operational requirement vis-a-vis its operational deployment
              in the event of war, but Paris agreed to remove the plane's deficiencies. The negotiations
              began to become unstuck when it came to the price tag of $3 billion for 32 aircraft, a figure
              that shot up to $4.1 billion when the cost of a 10-12 year financing package was included.
              The PAF continued to press for the technical package, but had to combat both tough French
              negotiating tactics and the Pakistan government's reluctance to pay for such a large
              purchase. The deal was ultimately killed in late 1996 by the caretaker government of Malik
              Meraj Khalid, who was scared off by a distorted media campaign against the Mirage
              acquisition. During this difficult period, the PAF had little option but to take steps to maintain
              its fleet size and operational capability.

              This involved the induction of additional F-7 aircraft and the launch of two major upgrade
              programmes, the most important involving the upgrade and overhaul of existing Mirage III and
              Vs, as well as F-7s, A-5s and T-37 basic trainer aircraft. The PAF is currently taking delivery
              of 40 upgraded Mirage III and V aircraft under a $118 million contract finalised in February
              1996.

              This followed the procurement of 50 mothballed Mirages from Australia under a A$27 million
              deal finalised in April 1990, from which a total of 45 aircraft have been recovered, upgraded
              and inducted into the PAF. Unfortunately, the imposition of fresh sanctions by the United
              States in May 1998, following the tit-for-tat nuclear tests conducted first by India and then
              Pakistan, has again hit the PAF's maintenance of its F-16 fleet. These sanctions, imposed
              under the Glenn Amendment, has also affected the serviceability of the PAF's fleet of 12
              C-130s, reduced the availability of its automated air defence network, and rendered unusable
              the six TPS-43 radar employed to provid high-level coverage over Pakistan.

              ------------------
              CROIRE A L'INCROYABLE
              You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

              Comment


                #8
                Thank you Malik, have a spring roll on me. ZZ isn't around at the moment, he's watching his favourite video..."Enter the Dragon".

                Comment


                  #9
                  Thanks Xtreme I'm off to lunch, think I'll try the local Chinese - wonder what the fortune cookies hold for me? http://www3.pak.org/gupshup/smilies/smile.gif

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Hmm do the same rules apply for the general???
                    If so.
                    Then you two better stop making out and get back to the topic. http://www3.pak.org/gupshup/smilies/biggrin.gif

                    ------------------
                    CROIRE A L'INCROYABLE
                    You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Why don't you join in the fun CM? http://www3.pak.org/gupshup/smilies/smile.gif

                      I think that a separate thread should be started as a folder to bring together all the PAK-China military cooperation?

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by CM:
                        I was just checking out BK and i really think we need a forum for Military info board.
                        Here is something cool and bad.
                        More help from the chinese and not the west.

                        =============================================

                        G-7 sanctions retard Super-7 project

                        ISLAMABAD - The Pakistan Air Force (PAF) is on the verge of downgrading the specifications
                        for its next-generation multi-role combat aircraft, the Super-7, because of the Group of
                        Seven's enforcement of an informal ban on weapons sales since last year's military take-over,
                        a ranking PAF source said Thursday. "We will soon reach the point where we may be forced to
                        take a decision to adopt a Chinese avionics suite, instead of the more advanced technology
                        we had hoped to procure from the West," he told The Nation.

                        "Air Command has already been instructed to draw up alternate plans," he said. The political
                        fall-out of the G-7 sanctions is also expected to upset the development schedule of the
                        Super-7, delaying delivery of the first prototype beyond its 2003 deadline, the PAF source
                        said. The revelation comes a week after India sealed a contract with Russia for the supply of
                        140 Sukhoi Su-30 Mk1 fighters, along with a complete transfer of technology and production
                        licence. The combination of India's latest acquisitions and the downgrading of the Super-7's
                        technology are a major blow to the PAF, which has been seeking to re-establish a qualitative
                        edge over its Indian counterpart and expected the new combat plane to fulfil about 70 per
                        cent of its future operational requirements.

                        The hi-tech version of the Super-7 was viewed as the ideal replacement for the PAF's ageing
                        medium-tech fleet of F-6s, F-7s, A-5s and Mirages, which are to be retired over the next
                        decade. It is now obvious that its Air Staff Requirement of 150 Super-7s will have to be
                        revised to take into account its inability, in the short-to-medium term, to procure advanced
                        Western avionics, including a multi-mode Pulse Doppler Radar, a mission computer, INS and
                        multi-function displays. The Western arms embargo also means that the PAF will have to
                        revise the Super-7's weapons package, which was to have included a variety of conventional
                        and guided weapons, a potent SRAAM and an active MRAAM.

                        The PAF will have little choice but to press the government for a much larger number of the
                        Chinese version of the combat plane, known as the FC-1, which is to have basically the same
                        airframe as the Super-7, but would have to be equipped with Chinese-manufactured avionics
                        and weapons systems. There are also small differences in aircraft systems and equipment.
                        Pakistan has had to struggle to find an overseas partner for the Super-7 venture. Its earlier
                        overtures to Turkey and the United Arab Emirates were rebuffed. Ankara remains committed to
                        the production under licence of the F-16, while the UAE has preferred off-the-shelf purchases.
                        Beijing, too, had hesitated to form a joint venture, because of its belief in more affordable
                        options and weaponry, and had sought to place the responsibility for the procurement of
                        avionics with the PAF.

                        They were finally convinced by former chief of the air staff, Air Marshal Abbas Khattak, to
                        collaborate in the avionics venture on strategic grounds. It took three years of negotiations
                        between 1995 and 1998 to finalise the two sides' selection of equipment, statement of work
                        and cost evaluation. A memorandum of understanding was signed by the governments of
                        Pakistan and China during the visit of the then prime minister, Nawaz Sharif, to Beijing in
                        February 1998. This was followed by the inking of a formal contract during his next visit to
                        China in June last year. Appropriately, Thursday's revelations about the Super-7's development
                        came on the sidelines of a ceremony at Air Headquarters to launch The Story of the PAF
                        (1988-98) - A battle against the odds, a book that details the retarding effect of international
                        sanctions on Pakistan's air defence capability over the last decade.

                        The book, drafted by a team led by retired Air Marshal Rasheed Sheikh, candidly relates the
                        difficulties encountered by the PAF since October 1990, when the Bush administration
                        adjudged Pakistan to have crossed the nuclear threshold. This resulted in the cancellation of
                        the Peace Gate-IV programme, under which Pakistan was to have spent US$1.4 billion on the
                        induction of 60 new F-16s between March 1993 and February 1997. The enforcement of the
                        Pressler Amendment was reflected within a year, when the PAF's fleet of F-16s was hit by
                        engine-related problems and all aircraft had to be grounded. The PAF's Project Falcon initiated
                        engine inspections and depot level work at the Sargodha Air Base, but it took two years to
                        recover the 32 aircraft.

                        Washington also resisted the implementation of the Falcon-Up F-16 upgrade programme,
                        saying it was prohibited under the Pressler Amendment, but were eventually convinced to
                        relent on the grounds that programme was a safety-related one, and did not enhance the
                        aircraft's operational capability. The earlier enforcement of the Pressler Amendment also
                        prompted the PAF to launch efforts to procure a non-American hi-tech aircraft.

                        Between late 1990 and 1993, it evaluated and rejected the British Tornado, took a close look
                        at the Mirage 2000E, and received a misleading offer from Poland for the supply of MiG-29s
                        and Su-27s. In 1992, the PAF revived an 11-year-old proposal to acquire 20-40 Mirage 2000s,
                        but Paris was reluctant to sell a fully capable version for political reasons. A possible
                        alternative appeared in August 1994, when Sweden's SAAB conglomerate offered to supply its
                        JAS-39 Grippen aircraft, but the deal was killed because of its 20 per cent American
                        component content.

                        Meanwhile, France had offered the Mirage 2000-V and upon re-evaluation, the PAF concluded
                        that model incorporated the technological jump that it had been looking for. The French offer
                        was not based upon the PAF's the operational requirement vis-a-vis its operational deployment
                        in the event of war, but Paris agreed to remove the plane's deficiencies. The negotiations
                        began to become unstuck when it came to the price tag of $3 billion for 32 aircraft, a figure
                        that shot up to $4.1 billion when the cost of a 10-12 year financing package was included.
                        The PAF continued to press for the technical package, but had to combat both tough French
                        negotiating tactics and the Pakistan government's reluctance to pay for such a large
                        purchase. The deal was ultimately killed in late 1996 by the caretaker government of Malik
                        Meraj Khalid, who was scared off by a distorted media campaign against the Mirage
                        acquisition. During this difficult period, the PAF had little option but to take steps to maintain
                        its fleet size and operational capability.

                        This involved the induction of additional F-7 aircraft and the launch of two major upgrade
                        programmes, the most important involving the upgrade and overhaul of existing Mirage III and
                        Vs, as well as F-7s, A-5s and T-37 basic trainer aircraft. The PAF is currently taking delivery
                        of 40 upgraded Mirage III and V aircraft under a $118 million contract finalised in February
                        1996.

                        This followed the procurement of 50 mothballed Mirages from Australia under a A$27 million
                        deal finalised in April 1990, from which a total of 45 aircraft have been recovered, upgraded
                        and inducted into the PAF. Unfortunately, the imposition of fresh sanctions by the United
                        States in May 1998, following the tit-for-tat nuclear tests conducted first by India and then
                        Pakistan, has again hit the PAF's maintenance of its F-16 fleet. These sanctions, imposed
                        under the Glenn Amendment, has also affected the serviceability of the PAF's fleet of 12
                        C-130s, reduced the availability of its automated air defence network, and rendered unusable
                        the six TPS-43 radar employed to provid high-level coverage over Pakistan.

                        Pakistan got over this hurdle, thanks inpart to the Italian defense electronics manuafaturer; FIAR. They have tranferred technology for assembling 'Grifo radars' to Pakistan. This radar features look down capability within a radius of 27-30 kms. Other avionics for F-7 and Super-7 will be supplied by FIAR or Marcon Electronics of France.

                        PS, I have some more info on the frigates being manfuctured in Pakistan. Most of the assitance will come from Ukraine. I'll post it in detail..great post..http://www3.pak.org/gupshup/smilies/smile.gif

                        Comment


                          #13

                          And yes malik lets start a thread on China - Pak military trade.
                          And outlaw could you provide some of those sites where you get all of this military information???
                          I am a novice but a big fan of military tech and info.

                          ------------------
                          CROIRE A L'INCROYABLE

                          [This message has been edited by Mursalin (edited January 14, 2001).]
                          You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Yep let's make this a project of sorts? Outlaw is our resident military advisor so he can help us on gathering on all the info?

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Ok fine, anything in the news these days on military info?
                              Plus you have any links on military info?

                              ------------------
                              CROIRE A L'INCROYABLE
                              You can't fix stupid. So might as well troll them!

                              Comment

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