Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Help with Canadian Universities Needed Please

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Help with Canadian Universities Needed Please

    I just finished first year (in May actually) at the University of Calgary with a GPA (for both semesters) of 2.95. I am a psychology major who has already registered for my second year at U of C but I might be switching to another university in Canada, but not in the same province.

    For those in the know, am I too late for registering time or will all the courses I am looking to get into be filled up? I will only be taking courses in Humanities and Social Sciences, so keeping that in mind, as well as my GPA and the fact that I will be paying my own fees and tuition and rent and for food etc, what university should I look into.

    I don't have a job presently and I have only about 200 bucks saved up. I plan on taking loans out etc. but everything I will be doing will be out of my own pocket.

    Please advise accordingly. Thank you!

    Ps. Most of the courses I registered for for next year at the U of C are political science, psychology, law and society, law and society, and women's studies courses. I am looking to get a job immediately after finishing undergraduate in something that caters to these courses.

    #2
    Wow! moving out eh! That is quite a big undertaking. There is a good university here in Guelph, Ontario. Its like an hour's drive from Toronto.
    As I've studied in states so I might not be the best person to give u a suggestion for Canadian universities...but from what I know Guelph is a good school. Its a small town and off campus residence is comparitively cheaper... plus Toronto is not very far off so u can come over and party at anytime u like.

    Here is a link http://www.uoguelph.ca/undergrad_calendar/main.shtml
    Browse through it and see if it suits ur needs. Good luck!

    Comment


      #3
      Since you are looking to pay tution for yourself then you should consider the cheaper schools, preferably a school town since they would be cheaper to live in. Also public schools can be cheaper and sometimes easier to get into.

      If you are serious about moving, I would suggest you spend the next 2 weeks (40 hours) researching and applying to colleges. Call up their admissions offices and ask them what they need from you and what type of classes they have available.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Sarah Splendor:
        ..., but not in the same province.

        For those in the know, am I too late for registering time or will all the courses I am looking to get into be filled up? I will only be taking courses in Humanities and Social Sciences, so keeping that in mind, as well as my GPA and the fact that I will be paying my own fees and tuition and rent and for food etc, what university should I look into.

        I don't have a job presently and I have only about 200 bucks saved up. I plan on taking loans out etc. but everything I will be doing will be out of my own pocket.

        Please advise accordingly. Thank you!

        Ps. Most of the courses I registered for for next year at the U of C are political science, psychology, law and society, law and society, and women's studies courses. I am looking to get a job immediately after finishing undergraduate in something that caters to these courses.

        I'm not in the same field as you and so do not have concise information on my fingertips on universities that cater to your specific needs. There are some tidbits that I can add however.

        From your post it seems that you are looking for a relatively cheap university. That should naturally restrict your choices and knock out big city universities like U of T (because of higher rent, and so on). An easy thing to do is to just browse the university webpages and check out their fees section and then try to determine what is too much for you.

        About loans, I haven't applied for one so far. But I had a friend who came from Vancouver and apparently he had to wait for some time (like a year) before he could apply for OSAP (Ontario student loan). This is because you will not be considered a resident of Ontario but of Alberta. So, you might want to keep that in mind too.

        About U of Guelph (Boss' suggestion), it is a decent university nothing exceptional. If you're looking for academic excellence in your area, the only realistic choice in Ontario has to be the University of Toronto. If you're looking for a decent university then you might consider one of many like York, Guelph, Western Ontario....

        Some links that I dug up:

        1) http://www.artsandscience.utoronto.c...transfer.shtml

        This is UofT's section on how to tranfer from another university to Toronto's arts and science faculty.

        2) http://osap.gov.on.ca/eng/not_secure/contents.htm

        This link details OSAP requirements. And yes, you do have to be a resident of Ontario for over a year in order to be eligible for a loan. You might wanna read the details too. I just skimmed over them.

        3) http://arts.uwaterloo.ca/arts/prospective_students.html

        This is my uni, UW. I just thought I'd put the link in even though your area is not the area of expertise of this uni. Another reason why I included this link is because this university offers a co-op program in Arts. This is quite a useful option if you are willing to take it because you won't be incurring as deep a debt as you would be without any co-op job. Also, you get experience so it's not a bad thing. I'm not too sure if their Arts co-op program is a huge success or not but other programs are huge.

        So, if you dug up similar links from other Ontario univerities, you'll find a wealth of information which should help you make an informed decision.


        Note: I have given the information on the assumption that you are intersted in coming to Ontario plus that is the only information that I have.

        Comment


          #5
          Sorry I forgot to address the most important question that you asked.

          Unfortunately it is hard to put a finger on course selection and enrollment data. Apparently you are quite late applying to other univerities as you will know yourself (hopefully). However, I know many a people who have made last minute switches, acceptances to different universities and programs including myself. All you need is a sympathetic/helpful admissions/program advisor on the other end. If the guy is nice enough, he will pull a couple of strings and get you in. So it's just a matter of contacting the appropriate admissions staff from various universities and finding out how accomodating they are.

          As a rule of thumb, contact the program advisor for the program that you're interested in applying to. Normally these folks are quite helpful and if they feel that you'll be an asset to the university they will get you in. I'm just saying that because it worked for me a couple of years back and a couple of my classmates.

          Yes, you might not get into that easy bird course that everybody wants to take but there will always be a bit of give and take. After the first semester I think people tend to settle in quite nicely as far as the course selection is concerned.

          Comment


            #6
            I would agree with Sambrialian...
            U of T would be the first choice given your program/course interests. I've personally taken a couple of psych courses out of self-interest and the Pysch Program enrollment is quite competitive.

            However, since you'd only be eligible for OSAP after 12 months of stay within Ontario, it may be a lil hard to support yourself with a Canada Student Loan at U of T.

            I would suggest applying to universities where:
            1) its relatively easier to get in
            2) there are more possibilities of financial aid such as in-course bursaries etc.

            Keeping this in mind, may I suggest either
            York University or McMaster University... both with fairly well reputed Faculties of Arts & Science, and very accessible to students. That's actually another difference between U of T and other Univs. ... you have to go through different channels before you get to the right person whereas at Mac or York its relatively simpler.

            Having said that, student loans from banks such as TD or BMO are comparable to OSAP and may be a reasonable choice if you did want to apply to U of T or elsewhere where the tuition may be higher. One more thing to remember would be to check out the proposed tuition increase for upcoming years. For my brother entering Univ. this year, this simply meant eliminating a couple of obvious choices like Western and Queens.

            I'm a U of T graduate (Software Eng.) and am currently at Mac completing my MBA/PhD - I'd be more than happy to answer any other questions or help in any way possible.

            Ciao,
            Umar.
            For reason, ruling alone, is a force confining - and passion, unattended, is a flame that burns to its own destruction - Khalil Gibran

            Comment


              #7
              ..ooh you may be able to get some scholarship money @ www.studentawards.com



              ------------------
              "O people! Muhammad has no sons among ye men, but verily, he is the Messenger of Allah and the last in the line of Prophets. And Allah is aware of everything." (33:40)

              "The Hour will not come ... until nearly thirty "dajjals" (liars) appear, each one claiming to be a messenger from Allah." (Sahih Bukhari, Sahih Muslim)
              22.1 . O mankind! Fear your Lord . Lo! the earthquake of the Hour ( of Doom ) is a tremendous thing .

              Comment


                #8
                Thanks guys. You've been very helpful.

                Since I am not quite sure who to ask regarding this, I am asking here.

                Would it be a bad decision to take a year off, live and work in Ontario, and then enter second year in the fall of 2003? Would it be harder getting into university then as opposed to now? I am mostly thinking in terms of getting loans and getting the courses I want since my GPA happens to be quite low.

                Right now, I'm just kicking around options. I'd like to take the fool's way out and take a year off, move to Ontario, work and save up money so that I am on more surer footing before I enter university.

                Would taking a year off work to my disadvantage?

                Please advise. Thanks again.

                Comment


                  #9
                  On the contrary Sarah, I think its a better option! Youd definitely take some load outa ur cargo and also mitigate the ominous mind which is always good when you wanna go to skule. Besides you can apply to all the skules you want and hopefully get in where you actually wanna go!

                  Taking a year off and doing something constructive like working and may be perhaps taking a part time course at college would be useful and realistically practical and assuming you would wanna work after you graduate from skule it just adds to your portfolio and gives u a competitive advantage over the other grads who only have the academic background.
                  For reason, ruling alone, is a force confining - and passion, unattended, is a flame that burns to its own destruction - Khalil Gibran

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Just in terms of saving money, dont do the year of work for that. i would highly doubt that you would save any money in one year... especially your first year of work.

                    it is however great to do work, if it is related to what you want to do in the future and helps you in your career. It would definately help you get into another school. However if you do a job just to make it through the day then it would more then likely hurt your getting back into school.

                    Also if you do take a year off make sure you tell your existing college. generally they will let you take a year off without kicking you out.. great just in terms of options for the future. Also if you do take a year off, remember you will have to start applying for new schools just 6 months into the year cause of time for applications.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X