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    Is Everbody Going To Be I.T.Engineers

    http://search.hotwired.com/search97/...uild%20indias% 20bridges

    "Once I finish my engineering course, I definitely don't want to be a
    chemical engineering trainee. I want to be absorbed by an IT company,"
    Nautiyal said.

    "There is nobody in my class who wants to become a chemical engineer. I
    attribute this attitude not just to a trend, but also to the simple
    truth that while as a chemical engineering trainee I will get a stipend
    of about Rs 16,000 (about $350) a month, as an IT trainee I will earn
    twice or thrice that figure. My prospects of going abroad too will be
    much better as a software engineer than a chemical engineer."

    That attitude has resulted in a situation where electrical engineering
    firms are finding it hard to make good hires.

    "A common problem I seem to share with executives from firms like
    General Electricals and ABB is that there are not many talented fresh
    electrical, mechanical or civil engineers around," said Rajesh Jain,
    president of the Indian Electrical and Electronics Manufacturers'
    Association (IEEMAM).

    "Almost all engineering students, no matter which discipline they have
    chosen, are joining the IT industry.

    "We try to visit colleges and inform the students about the bright
    prospects in other fields. But since we cannot match up with the IT pay
    packets, the students don't seem to find us very convincing.... IT is
    swallowing all the young kids."

    However, the IT revolution may yet prove to have more casualties than
    success stories. Jobs in the United States are disappearing every week,
    and there are countless stories of Indians who get trained in software
    only to find jobs nonexistent or low-paying once they enter the
    workforce.

    One possible solution is for those in other engineering fields to
    convince students that they can use their software engineering skills in
    more traditional fields. It could lead to higher-paying jobs down the
    road.

    "Not many seem to realize that engineers who can combine conventional
    engineering skills with programm

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    But Who'll Build India's Bridges?
    by Manu Joseph
    2:00 a.m. Mar. 27, 2001 PST
    MUMBAI, India -- As revolutions go, the IT revolution was said to be
    relatively bloodless. But in India, it's killing other disciplines like
    mechanical, chemical and civil engineering.

    Bright young students are opting for courses that will take them to some
    Silicon Valley or another. The situation in almost all technical
    colleges in India is that even students who study mechanical or chemical
    engineering eventually learn programming skills so that they can end up
    in an IT firm in India or the United States.


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    Manoj Nautiyal is a good example of what many see as a trend. A
    third-year student in the chemical engineering department of the premier
    Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) in Mumbai, Nautiyal is simply
    biding his time, hoping for the day he can move into an IT program.
    His entrance exams were good enough to place him into the chemical
    engineering department, but not good enough to find a seat in computer
    science.

    He's taking his classes diligently, and in his spare time studies
    software programming by himself, from books and CDs.

    "Once I finish my engineering course, I definitely don't want to be a
    chemical engineering trainee. I want to be absorbed by an IT company,"
    Nautiyal said.

    "There is nobody in my class who wants to become a chemical engineer. I
    attribute this attitude not just to a trend, but also to the simple
    truth that while as a chemical engineering trainee I will get a stipend
    of about Rs 16,000 (about $350) a month, as an IT trainee I will earn
    twice or thrice that figure. My prospects of going abroad too will be
    much better as a software engineer than a chemical engineer."

    That attitude has resulted in a situation where electrical engineering
    firms are finding it hard to make good hires.

    "A common problem I seem to share with executives from firms like
    General Electricals and ABB is that there are not many talented fresh
    electrical, mechanical or civil engineers around," said Rajesh Jain,
    president of the Indian Electrical and Electronics Manufacturers'
    Association (IEEMAM).

    "Almost all engineering students, no matter which discipline they have
    chosen, are joining the IT industry.

    "We try to visit colleges and inform the students about the bright
    prospects in other fields. But since we cannot match up with the IT pay
    packets, the students don't seem to find us very convincing.... IT is
    swallowing all the young kids."

    However, the IT revolution may yet prove to have more casualties than
    success stories. Jobs in the United States are disappearing every week,
    and there are countless stories of Indians who get trained in software
    only to find jobs nonexistent or low-paying once they enter the
    workforce.

    One possible solution is for those in other engineering fields to
    convince students that they can use their software engineering skills in
    more traditional fields. It could lead to higher-paying jobs down the
    road.

    "Not many seem to realize that engineers who can combine conventional
    engineering skills with programming skills have a great future," said J.
    Vasi, a professor in the electrical department of IIT.

    ------------------

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    When was i for real?
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    #2
    To reply to yur question in the subject....

    Yes they are!!! .... or it looks like it... to me...

    while I have VERY CLOSE links in IT sector in pak .... I still chose Robotics and Automation as my Engineering degree....

    But I also believe in another concept..... If yur good at what you do...... what ever you do...... theres a place for you ...

    Comment


      #3
      hiya
      im a chemical engineering student in the uk, and i know what u mean, but in the uk there is a real prospective for chemical engineers and they are more well paid compared to any engineering field, as far as i know
      becoz every 1 is going into it there seems to be a shortage of chem engineers in the uk and companies have realised this and are trying top promote chemical engineering in the uk
      visit this website www.whynotchemeng.com

      ------------------
      people are lonely because they build walls instead of bridges
      I love deadlines. I especially like the whooshing sound they make as they go flying by

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