Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Pakistani society looks other way as gay men party

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Pakistani society looks other way as gay men party

    Pakistani society looks other way as gay men party

    Homosexuality 'thriving' despite strict criminal code
    Marriage and cultural factors offer camouflage


    Declan Walsh in Lahore
    Tuesday March 14, 2006
    Guardian


    A ban on kite-flying failed to dampen the spirits of party-goers in Lahore at the weekend, where hundreds of parties took place to celebrate the age-old Basant festival. But one gathering stood out.
    Under a starry sky filled with fireworks, about 150 gay men clambered to the roof of an apartment building for an exuberant party. Bollywood music spilled into the streets as dress-wearing men twisted and whirled flamboyantly.
    Some older men with moustaches and wearing traditional shalwar kameez stared silently from the sidelines. But most of the party-goers were in their 20s, dressed in jeans and T-shirts, and looking for a good time. "We just want to have fun," said one of the organisers, known as the "hot boyz".
    Homosexuality is taboo in Pakistani society, where sexual orientation is rarely discussed and the gay rights debate is non-existent. Sodomy is punishable by up to life in jail, and religious leaders condemn gay men as an aberration of western corruption.
    When President Pervez Musharraf boasted of empowering minorities, during a press conference with George Bush in Islamabad 10 days ago, he was unlikely to have been referring to gay emancipation. Yet many homosexuals say their community is quietly thriving, often with the tacit acceptance of a society which prefers to look the other way. Assaults on gay men are rare; sodomy laws are seldom invoked.
    Communities of Hijra - a transsexual group, with roots which stretch back to the Mughal empire - are found in all major cities. "In a bizarre way homosexuality is condemned but not opposed," said a gay man from Karachi. "There is an indulgence here, a cultural ability to live and let live."
    Such matters gain little political capital. When Urdu-language newspapers accused a former chief minister of Sindh province of being a cross-dresser two years ago, the storm quickly blew over and the politician kept his job.
    The apparent open-mindedness is at odds with Pakistan's austere and socially conservative image abroad. Last year Punjabi authorities briefly banned female participants in marathon races, while sex outside marriage between men and women is punishable by death.
    Cultural factors offer one explanation - gay men can easily camouflage their relationships because public displays of affection between men, such as holding hands, are widely accepted. "Western gays are gobsmacked about how easy it is to pick up guys here, how often they are approached," one gay man said.
    Nevertheless, homosexuality, like anything related to sex, is practised with great discretion. Internet chat rooms provide a safe and anonymous forum for middle- and upper-class gay men. Cohabiting couples are rare, and most gay men still marry to avoid scandalising their families.
    An Afghan refugee sparked controversy in the Khyber tribal agency last September when he was "married" to a 16-year-old boy. A tribal council ordered the pair to leave, or be stoned for breaking religious and tribal values.
    And many Pakistanis ignore their existence, seeing homosexuality as an abhorrent, western practice. "It is not allowed in Islam and is surely against the laws of nature; it is one of the signs of the end of the world," a contributor to a BBC Online debate recently wrote.
    Unlike vocal gay rights activists in western countries, many Pakistani gay men feel that the lack of debate suits them. "If we were being actively persecuted, then we might fight in public," said a gay man in Islamabad. "But you don't want to pick a fight you can't win."


    http://www.guardian.co.uk/gayrights/...730228,00.html

    #2
    Re: Pakistani society looks other way as gay men party

    Homosexuals and hijras were always considered more of a mild amusement than a threat; there is nothing surprising in this article.

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Pakistani society looks other way as gay men party

      Originally posted by LuxuryItem
      Under a starry sky filled with fireworks, about 150 gay men clambered to the roof of an apartment building for an exuberant party. Bollywood music spilled into the streets as dress-wearing men twisted and whirled flamboyantly.
      Some older men with moustaches and wearing traditional shalwar kameez stared silently from the sidelines. But most of the party-goers were in their 20s, dressed in jeans and T-shirts, and looking for a good time. "We just want to have fun,"
      In a homo-social soceity such as Pakistan, again, this is neither alarming or out of character. Heck, go to any wedding and you'll find boys/men bhangra-pao'ing with each other.

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Pakistani society looks other way as gay men party

        Originally posted by LuxuryItem
        In a homo-social soceity such as Pakistan, again, this is neither alarming or out of character. Heck, go to any wedding and you'll find boys/men bhangra-pao'ing with each other.
        If they are bhangra-paaing togather doesn't mean they are homo-sexual. It is more of a cultural thing.
        May Allah bring peace in Pakistan. Ameen
        Aray Logo Tumhara Kiya
        Main Jano Mera, Mera Khuda janay-

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Pakistani society looks other way as gay men party

          i hate it when guys hold hands in pak...freaks me out....
          "Seek Allah's help with patient perseverance and prayer. It is indeed hard except for those who are humble." (2:45)

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Pakistani society looks other way as gay men party

            ^
            Why does it freak you out, sounds like you have an underlying issue.

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Pakistani society looks other way as gay men party

              Originally posted by LuxuryItem
              Homosexuals and hijras were always considered more of a mild amusement than a threat; there is nothing surprising in this article.
              true. however hijras have it bad in pakistan. they cant get jobs. they are forced into dancing, begging and prostitution. gay men dont have it as bad...they can 'hide' their sexual preferences and continue to function in society as any other man..
              "Are you Laiiiiike .....Chaaicking me Aoout?"

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Pakistani society looks other way as gay men party

                Originally posted by underthedome
                ^
                Why does it freak you out, sounds like you have an underlying issue.
                i just dont like it...i have no other issues...just my own opinion...why does everything think thier dr phil all the time?
                "Seek Allah's help with patient perseverance and prayer. It is indeed hard except for those who are humble." (2:45)

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Pakistani society looks other way as gay men party

                  ^lol
                  [Everything looks so perfect from far away..*]

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Pakistani society looks other way as gay men party

                    Bah. Off with their freaking heads. They should have just gone in with guns blazing and killed the 150 sodomizing *******s.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Pakistani society looks other way as gay men party


                      Jism bhi aur jaan bhi nahin

                      Ragoon kai andheroon ko, insaf chahiya
                      Ranjish-e-khoon ko bhi, makan chahiya

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: Pakistani society looks other way as gay men party

                        I still fail to understand how a guy could ever want to be with another guy.

                        Homosexuality is taboo in Pakistani society, where sexual orientation is rarely discussed and the gay rights debate is non-existent

                        ^ Oh yeah its definately not as 'taboo' as some people believe it to be.
                        "Today in heaven they opened up a new chest dedicated to charity. It's name ?"

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: Pakistani society looks other way as gay men party

                          Quoting these foreign papers , and showing the stuff as an exposŤ of the society, in it's own is pretty naÔve. I mean it's the usual rant -- Pakistanis intolerant, gun toting, bomb-exploding dastards. We're a lot more "tolerant" as this "gay" issue illustrates. Sexuality isn't really a big deal in Pak and so is rarely talked about. Unlike them, we don't have skinhead gangs killin the poor hijras!

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: Pakistani society looks other way as gay men party

                            yeah we vent all our hatred and frustration on discussion forums. its the healthy way. we're all really good people in real life. really!
                            "Are you Laiiiiike .....Chaaicking me Aoout?"

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Re: Pakistani society looks other way as gay men party

                              The reason people turn a blind eye to it is because we are not to take the law into our own hands and those that are suppose to enforce the law in our country are useless anyway.

                              It doesn't mean to say our society approves of it, it is looked down upon more than it is in the west. It might be easier for gay couples to go unnoticed in Pakistan because public displays of non-sexual brotherly affection such as hugging, holding hands and sometimes pecks on the cheek between heteroseuxal friends of the same gender are considered acceptable and normal, Pakistanis are not paranoid so the few gay couples here and there go unnoticed.

                              An Afghan refugee sparked controversy in the Khyber tribal agency last September when he was "married" to a 16-year-old boy. A tribal council ordered the pair to leave, or be stoned for breaking religious and tribal values.
                              That report was proven to be a lie, there was no gay marriage it was just a rumour, I don't know why people keep reiterating something which did not happen, just shows how trustworthy this journalist is.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X