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    Pakistani Law

    I have a question for anyone who may know the answer. Is Pakistani Law Sharia law or common law? My impression is that it is some type of mixture of both. What is the truth?


    #2
    Dear Vision
    The Answer is strange. In Pakistan there are three sort of systems. British law, American Law and Islamic law. If you do not believe then why we have different Shariat Courts and regular courts like high or supreme. Plus another system of courts is bieng developed recentle that is speedy courts.

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      #3

      Pakistan.. Law? hmmmm when did this happen? J/K

      Pakistani Law is essentially based on the British court system with some influences from the American system and then the sharia system.

      Ze Uno Ze Only
      The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing the world he did not exist. And like that... he is gone.

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        #4
        VISION : there is no such thing as law in Pakistan. The word law means everybody has to obey it and there is no such animal in Pakistan. There are some rules that are applied selectively depending on who you are, whats your family status, how much money you have, and if you have any powerful freinds.
        If you don't have any of the above and are just ordinary citizen you are subject to all the rules that might be called laws. If you are are rich, have freinds or family who can pull srtings, there is no law for you, islamic or unislamic. If you are deemed Anti-government and Anti-establishment you are guaranteed to be tried under islamic law just to make sure your conviction and total destruction. So whether there is a law or not and which laws you are subject to depends on who you are. Ohh yeah there is one law and there is one and only one man that every body sucumbs to just the sight of this man. The law followed the most in Pak is the MONEY and the man that every body succumbs to, is Mohammad Ali jinah, OOps not Mohammad Ali Jinah, I mean his Picture on the money bills.

        [This message has been edited by J M Khan.]

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          #5
          You know, there is one so called law that exists. Its birthplace is Pakistan, and its being exercised upto the full extent in Pakistan. The law is
          "Might Is Right"
          What d'ya think

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            #6
            Hate to disagree, but I really think that we Americans have the not so auspicious title of head war monger. I think we pretty much put the icing on the "might makes right" cake when we dropped the big one on Hiroshima.

            Then again, Mao's "power comes from the barrel of a gun" is as old as humanity. You folks do seem to have an interesting breed of lawlessness, though!

            Thanks for the response!

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              #7
              Kahn:

              Thanks for the thoughtful reply. So, if I am a single American Christian woman working for a development agency in Pakistan, which law applies to me?

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                #8


                Vision

                That depends if you fall under the diplomatic protection protocol or not. If you dont fall under it, then Pakistani law applies to you fully just as a pakistani student in USA would be liable to all US laws.


                Best Regards
                The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing the world he did not exist. And like that... he is gone.

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                  #9
                  Fraudz:

                  No diplomatic immunity here.

                  Does that mean that if I (a single woman) am out shopping alone in the bazaar in, say, Quetta, I can be picked up by the police and thrown in jail for prostitution?

                  My main concern is my safety and my personal rights. Does that sound funny?

                  Also, with 3 different systms of law, how do they define when which law will be used? Is Sharia law used for family law and American law for business law?

                  [This message has been edited by vision.]

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                    #10
                    Hi miss Vision,
                    Not at all. I think what you are talking about here is the viel that Muslim women take usually, or the fact that normally a muslim woman does'nt go out alone.
                    These are the things that one can undrestand gradulally rather than in a day. If you study Islam closely, you'll understand why Muslim women tend to cover them selves up.
                    As far the question of prostitution goes, I think you were influenced to ask that question due to the strict laws of Islam in Afghanistan. Those laws, sorry to say are moulded laws of Islam. My mother for instance, takes a scarf and that does'nt stop her from going out alone, on foot or car.
                    Enterprise out

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                      #11
                      Vision : Well let me tell you about this strange tendency Pakistani people and government has. The tendency is if you are a foriegner, you are more likely to be able to get away with even breaking the laws that most Pakistanis will be prosecuted for. There are several laws that are invalid and null in case where a foreigner is involved. For exmaple if a Pakistani is cought (off course not a rich or powerfull one) buying, selling, or drinking alcohol, they will be thrown in jail, but foriengners are allowed (by law) to buy and drink alcohol, Off course the richs in Pakistan have the same immunity( and they use is very often) but not by law, by the power of green bucks. As far you geting in trouble for shopping around alone, thats not likely. Though the Pak police always look for an excuse to get the citizens in trouble so they can squeeze some money outa him, being a foriegner gives you total immunity from corrupt police. As far people are concerned, You will find most of the people very helpfull and polite because its against the culture and tradition to hurt a visitor who is considered as guest.
                      Sincerely
                      J.M.Khan

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                        #12
                        Enterprise:

                        Yeah, I know about the veil, which I understand as well. Frankly, I find it comfortable as well as comforting. I've been in Paksitan, but spent most of my time up in the Northern Areas, which is quite different from the cities and down in the south.

                        My experience for the most part was just what you mentioned, that people were very kind and helpful. Though not particularly in the cities, where I drew unwanted attention in spite of my veil and shalwar qameez.

                        My question comes form some literature I've been reading regarding human rights and women's rights and actually, the women getting picked up for prostitution example came from Karachi, Not Kabul! I didn't think that kind of thing went on in Pakistan, but apparently it still does.


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                          #13
                          Hey, how come no one has addressed my question about MQM? DO any of you guys know about it?

                          Sorry for going outside this thread, but I really want to know! Did I commit some horrible BB sin?

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                            #14
                            Miss Vision:
                            As you have already been to Pakistan therefore it means that you do understand cultural boundries women have to face in our culture. I would like to add one thing though. If we look at the history of Pakistan we can easily understand that women rights awareness started somewhere in the late seventees and still the women literacy rate in Pakistan is way below as compare to men. It is well understood that "You can not help someone who does not want to be helped." Same is true for the most part of the women population. Luckily the awareness has started and hopefully it will be faster everyday. In USA women got right to vote in 1920s, after almost 150 years of declaration of Independence. Give us some time, hopefully not that long, we will get better. We still have old generation with us who were very active in making of Pakistan and in their minds the place of women is still at home, centuries old traditional. This thing is called "change". THe change is very difficult.

                            I don't know the story behind women picked up in Karachi for prostitution, but I can safely say that they might be for what they were arrested.

                            Once you were there and now you are here safe and sound, hopefully you will be again and again.

                            Regards

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