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    Future of Cricket

    Where do you see the sport of Cricket in 15 years time?

    like i have said many times, i feel the sport will have virtually centralized in the subcontinent by then, and gora nations will be significantly less interested in the sport....which, in my opinion, is terrible.

    Bold predictions: 2 teams will have been stripped of Test status by then, but Bangladesh will not be one of these 2 teams....and Test cricket will be on its death bed.

    in general, i am not very optimistic about the future of cricket.

    #2
    Re: Future of Cricket

    Future of Cricket = Sami will know how to bowl and where to land it, and Arshad will start getting crucial wickets in every match. They will be completely out of the team by then, and PCB will start giving more chances to next Sami and Arshad in the making in domestic cricket, for a period of next fifteen years.

    Well, now then, since that's settled.........

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      #3
      Re: Future of Cricket

      Scribbled on the wall over a urinal :
      "Cricket kaa future aapke haath mein hai"

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        #4
        Re: Future of Cricket

        Originally posted by Some1
        Scribbled on the wall over a urinal :
        "Cricket kaa future aapke haath mein hai"


        :biggthumb

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          #5
          Re: Future of Cricket

          Originally posted by nikhil25
          Where do you see the sport of Cricket in 15 years time?

          like i have said many times, i feel the sport will have virtually centralized in the subcontinent by then, and gora nations will be significantly less interested in the sport....which, in my opinion, is terrible.

          Bold predictions: 2 teams will have been stripped of Test status by then, but Bangladesh will not be one of these 2 teams....and Test cricket will be on its death bed.

          in general, i am not very optimistic about the future of cricket.
          I have had same fears for some time now .. which is why I always want England, South Africa and Australia to do well. Without these big names cricket could die the same death hockey did in just a decade's time. If these teams don't stay good at it, they'll move on to football and rugby and just India-vs-Pakistan-vs-SriLanka will be mighty boring.

          Look what happened to West Indies... their poor performance along with basketball diluted the following for the game, which led to poorer performances. It's a vicious cycle.....

          We should let Australia, new zealand, South Africa and England win more often...or else they will go home and stop playing with us.
          You'll get nothing, and like it

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            #6
            Re: Future of Cricket

            While on the subject of "Future of Cricket", below is an interesting article :

            http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article...086146,00.html

            Big hits and big money make for dark future

            An EERIE feeling came over me as I watched that extraordinary game of cricket between Australia and South Africa from my hotel room in Chandigarh. Well, I saw the last 20-odd overs. I had been watching, and subsequently writing about, the second Test between India and England in Chandigarh’s twin city, Mohali.
            Well, extraordinary doesn’t do it credit, really. To refresh your memory, Australia scored a record 434 for four in their 50 overs and lost. I saw the end of the matter, when South Africa somehow managed to finish on 438 for nine. That’s damn near nine an over. When I first started watching international cricket in the 1960s, more than two an over was reckoned to be downright reckless.

            I watched the match on Indian television, a business that rather tries one’s patience. Not because they kept losing the satellite feed, or anything comic like that. The problem was the advertisements.
            On Indian television, any moment when they give you an actual programme is bitterly resented by the station and is regarded as a wasted opportunity. So, naturally, there were adverts between every over. You were never off duty, always being nagged at, harried, pestered, or flirted at by lovely girls with rupees in their eyes.
            On the occasions when the station was forced to show you the actual cricket, it kept up its interest with little pop-ups and ad-bars and sly little captions, all reminding you of things you can buy. Despite all this, I was, naturally, enjoying the cricket.
            Then the thought hit me: am I watching the future of cricket? Nothing but sixes and adverts, big hits and big money? It was a chastening thought. I had just come from the Test and I had watched the match change before my eyes in a spell of mesmeric bowling from Anil Kumble. No sixes. An occasional breaking of the silken shackles, but on the whole, it was a biff-free session of cricket. And enthralling, of course. Not sexy, just brilliant.
            Tony Greig, a man never frightened of hyperbole, said that the Australia-South Africa game was the greatest ever played. Meaning, no doubt, the greatest one-day international. And it was certainly remarkable enough. The enthralling thing was that it was exceptional. It was not what you expect. If we saw it every week, it would be infinitely less interesting.
            Cricket comes in many forms these days. Test cricket is now far less popular on the sub- continent than the one-day game. Much of India is a brasher, less contemplative place than it was. Much of India is also in the middle of a passionate love affair with consumerism. Instant cricket, then the hard sell — these are parts of modern India.
            Cricket’s rulers keep tinkering with one-day cricket to try to make it more sexy, with the now-abandoned supersubs, and the power play. Both are devices to encourage big- hitting batsmen, to make sexier television programmes, to allow the television station to sell more advertisements.
            These are the facts of life in modern professional sport and there is no need to be squeamish about it. Twenty20 cricket was invented for much the same reason and you won’t hear a bad word about it, even from traditionalists. It widens the fan base, makes cricket sexier, and a professional sport needs sexiness if it is make its financial way.
            I don’t oppose change, but all the same, the more a sport seeks sexiness, the more it is in danger. Twenty20, jolly good fun and all that, is basically cricket for people who don’t really like cricket. This is a process you see in other sports — they adjust to please people who don’t really like the sport.
            In baseball, the American League wanted more home runs, so they allowed a player to bat for the pitcher, as designated hitter. The National League prides itself on being a purer form of the game and, indeed, the sight of the pitcher coming on at crucial stage needing to find an alien competence is a riveting aspect to the game. But not if you want more home runs.
            Football was looking for a television-friendly way to resolve drawn games and came up with the penalty shoot-out. This is not football. Worse, it creates matches when both sides agree not to play football, so they can settle the matter on penalties. There is no way of changing this now because television viewers love the drama. It is the selling-out of the heartland. Don’t consider football-lovers, cricket-lovers, baseball-lovers because they’ll watch anyway. You can take them for granted. The people you are interested in are those who don’t even like the game. Give them spectacular and dramatic television and the money rolls in. It is a policy that works. But there are two great dangers. The first is that the betrayed heartland audience might not be as content with a second-rate product as the marketing people thought. And the second is that if you attempt to make allies of fickle people, don’t be surprised if they find something sexier next week. The danger of the process is that you end up losing both your heartland and your fringe audience. Is that the future of sport?

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              #7
              Re: Future of Cricket

              Cricket is becoming a game for sluggers. More and more captains we see toady are batsman, their coach batsman and even in some instances Executives were previous great batsman.

              We are loosing the bowler's touch. Bowlers rarely get wickets that favours them. Very one-dimensional. There are few cricketers namely Afridi and Sehwag that were not percieve to be Test players because in order to be one you must have good tempermant and foot work. Now they are very crucial to the team.

              When Saffies broke the world record by chasing 434, one could ask would this ever happen again? I mean you look at the match in India where Afridi made 102 on 45 balls, if Pakistan was batting first, yes there was a chace. Another game where Dhoni made 184*, if India was batting first, yes there was great chance. He probably would have broken Saeed Anwar's 194 record. Now I am not being jealous when I say if he had I would have hated it. The reason is Saeed Anwar, Sachin, Viv Richardson were class palyers - top notch. Dhoni, Afridi and Sehwag might be great entertainers but when it comes to great class of players, I don't think they match up and now when we talk about an individual breaking 200 mark, we consider Afridi, Gilchrist, Sehwag, Symonds and Dhoni for it.
              Last edited by Man with a Plan; Mar 17, 2006, 09:46 AM.

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