Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Historical Places of the Subcontinent

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Historical Places of the Subcontinent

    History is spreaded all over the Subcontinent. Some places like Taj Mehal, Shalamar Bagh, Laal Qila became more famous, whereas many places were forgotten. In this thread lets share history of some known and some unknown historical places of the subcontinent by posting a brief introduction of the place alongwith a picture or a video.

    I start with Khuda Abad Mosque situated near District Dadu. Khuda Abad remained capital of Sindh during 18th Century. Here are some details about the mosque and the city:


    Khudabad is a famous town in Sindh. It is located on the right side of Indus Highway, between Sehwan and Dadu. From 1701 to 1750AD, Khudabad served as the capital of Sindh.

    There is a renowned mosque in Khudabad known as Badshi Mosque or Jamia Mosque. Not just that, there are graves of King Yar Mohammad Kalhoro, his family members and ministers in the town, apart from some other historical sites of that period. At present, these sites are in a poor condition and no one seems to pay any attention to them.

    These days, Kalhora, Panhwar, Jamali, Chandio, Leghari , Bhand, Magnejo, Barejo, Mashehori,Kumbhar, Channa, Jalbani, Birmani Khushik, and Bhutto tribes live in Khudabad and their only source of income is crop cultivation with the help of the water that they get from the River Indus.

    Khudabad Mosque was built by the first ruler of the Kalhora dynasty, Mian Yar Mohammad Kalhora, between 1701 and 1718. The mosque is a remarkable example of that period’s exquisite architectural feats. It is built on a podium which is rectangular in shape. It is also known for the beautiful Kasi work on it. It is believed that 5,000 people used to offer their prayers at a time in the mosque during Yar Mohammad’s rule.

    It was Mian Yar Mohammad Kalhoro who made Khudabad the capital city of the Sindh because of its proximity with the River Indus. The town’s old name was Shikarpuri Panhwari; it was renamed Khudabad by Yar Mohammad Kalhoro in 1701AD when he came from Kalat and began to rule Sindh. It is said the prince of Multan, Moziuddin had arrested Mian Din Mohammad Kalhoro during a battle and Yar Mohammad Kalhoro managed to escape to Kalat. When he returned to Sindh his father Mian Naseer Mohammad and brother Mian Din Mohammad had taken control of the area. He declared himself king and made Khudabad capital of the province.

    Khudabad was the central place for business at the time as traders and tourists used to come from Central Asia and other places to do business and witness the town’s beauty. The revenue income of this historical city was 11,00,000 rupees annually. It is on record that the irrigation system here was improved by Kalhora rulers to cultivate thousands of acres of barren land.

    Mian Yar Mohammad Kalhoro died in 1718. Subsequently, Mian Noor Mohammad Kalhoro, the son of Mian Yar Mohammad Kalhoro, was made king. In 1750 Mian Noor Mohammad Kalhoro handed over his government to his son Mian Murad Yab Khan who was then living in Iran. Mian Noor Mohammad Kalhoro died on December 9, 1753 in Jasalmir and was buried in the city of Mohammadabad. The importance of Khudabad got diminished when Mian Muradabd Yab Khan decided not to live in Khudabad. He instead lived in Muradabad near Nsarpur along the Indus River. Muradabad was destroyed completely because of floods in 1757. Nowadays there is no trace left of the old Muradabad town.

    In 1832 General Napair succeeded in occupying Sindh. The British government cleaned the historical places through the local people and in 1932, as per the act of national heritage, these historical places were handed over to the archeological department.

    These days, Khudabad is a neglected town. Many historical places are in a poor condition and no one seems to be bothered about it. There is an urgent need for repairing some of these sites.

    In 1975, former prime minister Z. A. Bhutto released 200,000 rupees for Khudabad Mosque’s repair work but it was done in a such a way that the mosque’s original form was changed. In 1995, one tomb collapsed and another got damaged. The roof of the mosque is now standing with the support of pillars but can collapse any time. The condition of the tomb of Main Yar Mohammad Kalhoro, his family members and ministers is not well either. (There is currently some repair work is in progress due to special instructions of current Minister of Culture Sindh Government - Sassi Palejo)




    We should care for each other more than we care for ideas, or else we will end up killing each other.

    #2
    Re: Historical Places of the Subcontinent

    Nice information can you post some information on Babri masjid.
    "The point is Allah. And everything besides Allah, is besides the point."

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Historical Places of the Subcontinent

      Originally posted by UZ View Post
      Nice information can you post some information on Babri masjid.
      UZ thats a complicated matter and needs to be discussed from both the sides. I'll open a separate thread on this.

      PS: Come on people, do let us know about the historical places of subcontinent you visited or are aware of.
      We should care for each other more than we care for ideas, or else we will end up killing each other.

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Historical Places of the Subcontinent

        Mahboob Goth

        This is a place near Sukkar,where three sahbah Hadrat Muaz Jehni razi allah, Amr bin Absa razi allah and another sahabi grave are present.

        Let see if i dig more detail
        لا عيش إلا عيش الآخرة
        BROTHERS NOT SLAVES. Regain Respect

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Historical Places of the Subcontinent

          Originally posted by bao bihari View Post
          Mahboob Goth

          This is a place near Sukkar,where three sahbah Hadrat Muaz Jehni razi allah, Amr bin Absa razi allah and another sahabi grave are present.

          Let see if i dig more detail
          Intereting post bao bihari. It makes me think was Sahaba e Rasool travelled to Sindh before Arab conquest in 712 AD (i.e. after 80 years after the death of Rasool Allah ). We have Mazar of Abduallah Shah Ashabi in Makli graveyard, Thatta too.



          The uploader of this video provided information that Hazrat Abdullah cam to Sindhduring Samaa Period in 10th Century AH i.e. a Milenium after the Prophet.

          I've seen people claiming some foot sign in Laki Shah Saddar (near Sehwan Sharif) that they belonged to Hazrat Ali. Also there is a place Lahoot in Balochistan, which is treated as sacred place by Shia sect on the belief that Hazrat Ali visited and stayed there. If we see the historical perspective of these claims, they are just myths.

          Coming to graves of Sahaba near Sukkur, that may be people who accompanied MBQ during his conqust of Arod 'current day Rohri - the twin city of Sukkur'.
          We should care for each other more than we care for ideas, or else we will end up killing each other.

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Historical Places of the Subcontinent

            muqawee bro plz check for hazarat Tamim Ansari(radi Allah Anhu)

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Historical Places of the Subcontinent

              Originally posted by ninja hattori View Post
              muqawee bro plz check for hazarat Tamim Ansari(radi Allah Anhu)
              Did he travel to Sindh or India?
              We should care for each other more than we care for ideas, or else we will end up killing each other.

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Historical Places of the Subcontinent

                yes brother but i do not have any authentic site...

                so u may find more info about him........

                i heard his tomb is at somewhere in south india.....

                have u heard about a keralian king who accepted islam and went to makkah to meet Muhammad ;but never met Muhammad as Muhammad was passed away.....

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Historical Places of the Subcontinent

                  Originally posted by ninja hattori View Post
                  yes brother but i do not have any authentic site...

                  so u may find more info about him........

                  i heard his tomb is at somewhere in south india.....

                  have u heard about a keralian king who accepted islam and went to makkah to meet Muhammad ;but never met Muhammad as Muhammad was passed away.....
                  I never heard about this, it is famous that traders from Sindh visited Hijaz during Prophet's time and the prophet also put Sindhi Ajrak on his shoulders.
                  We should care for each other more than we care for ideas, or else we will end up killing each other.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Historical Places of the Subcontinent

                    Originally posted by ninja hattori View Post
                    yes brother but i do not have any authentic site...

                    so u may find more info about him........

                    i heard his tomb is at somewhere in south india.....

                    have u heard about a keralian king who accepted islam and went to makkah to meet Muhammad ;but never met Muhammad as Muhammad was passed away.....
                    There is a mosque in Kerala said to be constructed in 629AD

                    http://www.spiderkerala.net/resource...que-India.aspx
                    the indian troll

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Historical Places of the Subcontinent

                      Some facts about relationship between Arabs & People of Sindh

                      The author of Mujmaul Tawarikh has quoted an extinct Sanskrit work according to which the original inhabitants of Sindh were Jats and Meds. Early Arab writers on Sindh also say that Jats and Meds were important tribes in their time. Ibn Khurdabah mentions ‘zutts’ as guarding the route between Kirman and Mansura while Ibn Haukal writes:

                      “Between Mansura and Makran the waters from the Mehran form lakes and the inhabitants of the country are the Indian races called Zutt. The Chinese traveler Yuan Chwang who visited this region in the 7th century A.D. also mentioned Jats.”

                      “The Jats claim to be included in the 36 royal Rajput tribes. Some of them state that their forefathers came from Ghazni. But it is generally accepted that they are the descendants of the ancient Getae, or Jeutchi, from Scythia. Some authorities consider that they entered India some time in 1500 B.C. and are the same as the Jattikas mentioned in the Mahabharata, and also identical with the Jatti of Pliny and Ptolemy. Their original home was on the Oxus.” According to the Encyclopedia of Islam, the Jats of the lower Indus comprise both Jats and Rajputs, and the same rule applies to Las-Bela where descendants of former ruling races like the Sumra and and Samma of Sindh and the Langah of Multan are found. At the time of the first appearance of the Arabs they found the whole of Makran in possession of Jats (Zutts).

                      According to a ‘Hadis’, Hazrat Abdulla Bin Masood, a companion of the Prophet saw some strangers with the Prophet and said that their features and physique were like those of Jats.This means that Jats were present in Arabia even during the Prophet’s time. Hazrat Imam Bukhari (d. 875 A.D. — 256 A.H.) writing about the period of the Companions in his book “Al adab al Mufarrad” has stated that once when Hazrat Aisha (Prophet’s wife) fell ill, her nephews brought a Jat doctor for her treatment. We hear of them next when the Arab armies clashed with the Persian forces which comprised of Jat soldiers as well. The Persian Commander Hurmuz used Jat soldiers against Khalid Bin Walid in the battle of ‘salasal’ of 634 A.D. (12 hijri). It is said that since the Jats used to fight by tying chains to their feet, this battle is called Harb-e-Salasal (battle of chains).


                      This was the first time that Jats were captured by the Arabs. They put forward certain conditions for joining the Arab armies which were accepted, and on embracing Islam they were associated with different Arab tribes. This event proves that the first group of Pakistanis to accept Islam were Jats who did it as early as 12 hijri (634 A.D.) in the time of Hazrat Omar.

                      The Persian King Yazdjard had also sought the help of the Sindh ruler who sent Jat soldiers and elephants which were used against the Arabs in the battle of Qadisia. According to Tibri, Hazrat Ali had employed Jats to guard Basra treasury during the battle of Jamal. “Jats were the guards of the Baitul Maal at al-Basra during the time of Hazrat Osman and Hazrat Ali.” Amir Muawiya had settled them on the Syrian border to fight against the Romans. It is said that 4,000 Jats of Sindh joined Mohammad Bin Qasim. Qasim’s army and fought against Raja Dahir. Sindhi Jats henceforth began to be regularly recruited in the Muslim armies.


                      http://www.scribd.com/panhwar/d/1345...-Land-of-Sindh
                      We should care for each other more than we care for ideas, or else we will end up killing each other.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: Historical Places of the Subcontinent

                        Originally posted by ninja hattori View Post
                        am and went to makkah to meet Muhammad ;but never met Muhammad as Muhammad was passed away.....
                        \
                        the one who saw the miracle of split of moon from india?
                        People are afraid of what they don't understand

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: Historical Places of the Subcontinent

                          Shah Jehan Mosque, Thatta.. The only Mugal structure of Sindh built by Shahjahan




                          [FONT=Arial][SIZE=2]
                          Thatta (Thatto in local language) is a historical and important city of the Sind Province of Pakistan. The city lies some 100 kilometers east of the Karachi metropolis on the National Highway. With River Indus and the Arabian Sea coast to its west, Thatta was once an important and thriving city and a centre of the then newly thriving religion of Islam. From the 14th century four Muslim dynasties ruled Sind from Thatta, but in 1739 the capital was moved elsewhere and with it Thatta declined. Thatta has a very rich heritage of Muslim architecture during the era of the 16th and 17th century. Although Thatta is known for its history which dates back to some 2000 years, it is also known for the Shah Jahan Mosque - a masterpiece of Mughal construction. This mosque was built by Mir Abdullah on the orders of Mogul emperor Shah Jahan in 1647 A.D. It is said that Shah Jahan built this mosque as a gesture of gratitude to the people of Thatta for sheltering him during his youth after his father, Emperor Jahangir banished him from Delhi.[/SIZE][/FONT]
                          [FONT=Arial][SIZE=2]Architecturally unique, Shah Jehan mosque is the first mosque in this region to be constructed according to the principals of Mughal courtyard architecture. As per some Persian inscriptions, the foundation of the mosque were laid in 1644 and mosque was completed in 1647. The floor was paved with stone in 1657.The mosque is a superb example of crafty tile work. Its 93 domes and 33 arches with varying sizes add to their architectural beauty. The domes have been exquisitely laid in a mosaic of radiating blue and white tiles. Its blue tiles and mosaic work are alluring. Red brick is utilized rather than the more commonly seen pink sandstone and marble associated with Mughal buildings.[/SIZE][/FONT]

                          [FONT=Arial][SIZE=2]The main entrance of the mosque has a central domed chamber. The mosque has an open central courtyard of about 15,900 square feet. Arcades of red brick arches highlighted with bands of white surround the courtyard. The main entrance is in the eastern portion and the secondary entrances are contained in the north and south portion. The prayer hall has three bays on either side of the central meh-rab chamber. Each bay is covered by a low dome, which adds up to 93 domes. The proportion of the aisle to the low domes enables an acoustic range that in effect allows the prayers read in front of the mihrab to be heard in all parts of the mosque. The mosque is spread over an area of 51,850 square feet.[/SIZE][/FONT]


                          [FONT=Arial][SIZE=2]Unlike other mosques, Shah Jahan Mosque has no minarets. Instead of the typical three domes, there is only one main dome in the prayer hall. The ablution pond is not located in the center of the courtyard. Instead, it is in a square courtyard located within the eastern portion of the mosque. The ablution courtyard could be access from an arched opening in the domed entrance chamber but now is accessible only from the aisle of the eastern portion. The mosque is combination of Turkish and local artwork, which is profusely used on tile work in the ceiling decoration of semi domed and domed chambers; as well as in the fillings of interlaced arches.
                          [/SIZE][/FONT]
                          [FONT=Arial][SIZE=2]It would not be wrong to call this mosque as the mosque of domes and arches as one can see a series of lined arches while standing in any one corner. Each arch has a small atop with beautiful mosaic and tile work. In fact no Mogul period mosque is like the Shah Jahan mosque at Thatta, since the Mogul architects digressed from their typical architecture and designed this mosque totally different from those built in Lahore and Delhi in the same period. This is what makes this mosque unique from the rest and worth visiting - and admiring.

                          http://www.pakistanpaedia.com/landma...que_thatta.htm[/SIZE][/FONT]
                          We should care for each other more than we care for ideas, or else we will end up killing each other.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: Historical Places of the Subcontinent

                            Originally posted by TLK View Post
                            \
                            the one who saw the miracle of split of moon from india?
                            Interesting TLK Bhai. Whats the story behind that?
                            We should care for each other more than we care for ideas, or else we will end up killing each other.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Re: Historical Places of the Subcontinent

                              Originally posted by muqawwee123 View Post
                              .. The only Mugal structure of Sindh built by Shahjahan
                              That and Nine-Zero

                              joking

                              Originally posted by muqawwee123 View Post
                              Interesting TLK Bhai. Whats the story behind that?
                              When prophet performed the miracle of shaq-ul-Qamar, a king in india saw that from his palace. I dont remember the riwayat properly, but he probably knew from his religious books that someone from Arab will perform this miracle and that person will be a messenger of God. He started traveling towards Arab, but by the time he reached, Prophet was no more.
                              People are afraid of what they don't understand

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X