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Traditional embroidery in Pakistan

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    Traditional embroidery in Pakistan

    Share some Traditional embroidery designs from Pakistan (If possible, with a brief introduction).

    Sindhi Guj


    Beautiful Sindhi Gaj (dress/tunic) front segment from Pakistan. The piece is of fantastic shape. The piece was intended to start a dress or tunic, this is the main piece of embroidery which then other fabrics and arms/back would be added to. Wonderful collectible tribal textile that can also be used as a costume element or wall decor. These are available in every market. These are separate from dresses, after purchasing you can embedded them in any shape on your dress.

    Traditional products of Sindh, Pakistan.: Sindhi Embroidery Gaj














    We should care for each other more than we care for ideas, or else we will end up killing each other.

    #2
    Re: Traditional embroidery in Pakistan

    Phulk„ri and Bagh

    Phulkari, a traditional embroidery art, is well known for its intricate designs and bright cheerful colours worn by Punjabi women on special occasions and ceremonies. The word ‘Phulk„ri’ is made of two words Phul and K„ri, where Phul means flower and K„ri means technique, denoting the technique of making flowers with needle and thread. Some scholars feel that the art of Phulk„ri came from Iran where it is known as Gulk„ri. There are references to phulk„ri in Vedas, Mahabharat, Guru Granth Sahib and the folk songs of Punjab. In its present form, phulk„ri embroidery has been popular since the 15th century AD, but the art probably reached its zenith in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It is a form of craft in which embroidery is done in a simple and sparse design over shawls and dupattas. In some cases where the design is worked over very closely, covering the material entirely so that the base cloth is not visible, it is called bagh (a garden of flowers).

    The dating of these embroideries poses a great difficult. It cannot be said with certainty when the first phulk„ri was made; indeed no example is known today which can be positively dated to earlier than the 1820s. Even one hundred years old phulk„ris are very rare. Though the textiles themselves might not have survived - due to natural wear and tear and the effects of Indian climate, the best among such embroideries available today were probably made between 1870 and 1920. Museums in Ahmedabad, Delhi, Lahore and London include many baghs and phulk„ris among their acquisitions.


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    We should care for each other more than we care for ideas, or else we will end up killing each other.

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      #3
      Re: Traditional embroidery in Pakistan

      More Phulkari designs

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      We should care for each other more than we care for ideas, or else we will end up killing each other.

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        #4
        Re: Traditional embroidery in Pakistan

        Wow beautiful


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          #5
          Re: Traditional embroidery in Pakistan

          Originally posted by Lilly View Post
          Wow beautiful
          waiting for details of Multani kaRhai
          We should care for each other more than we care for ideas, or else we will end up killing each other.

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            #6
            Re: Traditional embroidery in Pakistan

            Originally posted by muqawwee123 View Post
            waiting for details of Multani kaRhai
            Are we only people rich with culture? Urdu people don't even have a culture!


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